Commute

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Sniper8052, Sep 3, 2004.

  1. Sniper8052

    Sniper8052 New Member

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    I have been mulling the idea of commuting to work by bike 44 miles each way. How much more power can I get from a recumbent and what speeds are sustainable?
    I have seen a few in London are they good in traffic or a nightmare?
    Sniper8052.
     
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  2. Bop Bop

    Bop Bop New Member

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    As you did not give any details, speed like anything else depends on many things type of bike, your ability, type of road (uphill, downhill, flat, streets, sidewalks, paths, paved, unpaved, etc.), amount of traffic on the road, number of cross streets, traffic lights, etc.

    Handling is bike specific SWB handle differently than LWB, under carriage steering is different from above carriage steering. Your abilities, how comfortable you are on the bike, how comfortable you are with the conditions you are riding on.

    I've had my EZ Sport into the low 20's mph without any issues, I'm sure there are riders who have gone faster.
     
  3. meb

    meb New Member

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    Not so much of a power increase as an aerodynamic reduction.
    Generally about 30% less aerodrag vs. a road bike; 15% less than a triathlon/time trial bike.

    Will be easier on the back since it's straight.

    Not as great in traffic as you are lower so less likely to be seen by drivers and it is more difficult for you to see over the cars.
     
  4. Number14

    Number14 New Member

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    I've been commuting on a Streetmachine for two weeks now. Only 8.5 miles each way but it is quicker than a DF. Motorists aren't a problem - the majority give a wide berth from the novelty factor!

    Bin-man stepped out in front of me yesterday, forcing a sudden stop. Only problem was gravity taking effect before I could get my feet onto the road. Cue one new mirror and one unhappy cyclist. Bin-mans comment that "those things are dangerous mate" didn't go down too well before I let fly with comments about prats walking into the road dragging bloody great bins behind them without looking.

    Still got a grin a mile wide and not a sore butt cheek in sight.
    :D
     
  5. bentbrian

    bentbrian New Member

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    I do a one way commute, home form work in the PM. It is a mixed bag of busy city streets and open quiet country roads. It is 17.7 miles. I could never do it on a DF without pains but it is comfortable and a blast on the 'bent. I ride a RANS Tailwind CLWB with OSS. My speeds are as fast as, or even faster than the DF (Trek 1000), especially going into headwinds. I have a bright flag that is the same as eye level for a SUV driver. As was noted in the above post the vehicles generally tend to give a wider berth when passing. However there are still those idiots that try to pass in oncomming traffic and you find yourself staring "eyeball to eyeball" as it were with a driver of an SUV or pickup truck. Not being familiar with the roads and traffic across the pond you would have to check that out and make your decision based on that. good luck!

    'bent Brian
     
  6. hazahl

    hazahl New Member

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    My Kettwiesel trike handles well in city-traffic. You can also get them with an electric powerassisting engine (EPE) which ensures you don't have to shower when arriving at work.
     
  7. LioNiNoiL

    LioNiNoiL New Member

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    44 miles through the city is a long haul no matter what you're riding. I recommend a folding bike like my M5 CMPCT so you can take the bus half-way.
     
  8. Conniebiker

    Conniebiker New Member

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    I do a 22mi per way commute to work. It is all paved hills, some rolling and some steep. A recumbent would be good on some areas of it but they tend to suffer on steeper hills. These hills tend to bring my MTB time and my road bike time to within 10 minutes of eachother(heavy roadie).
    If it is mostly flat or wind-exposed a recumbent is the way to go. If there is a lot of traffic or cities, I would reccomend a 3 wheel (tadpole)type recumbent for stability.
    Otherwise, look at a good time-trial equipped road bike.
     
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