Commuter Bicycle with fenders, chainguard, rack, etc., Any available in the U.S.?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Steven Scharf, Jun 30, 2003.

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  1. I'm looking for a commuter bicycle for someone, something like the Giant GSR Trekking Gts (GSR
    Trekking Gts, "http://www.bicyclemagic.com/products.php?show=140" which is not sold in the U.S..

    -Upright handlebars -No shocks -Mudguards -Fenders -Rack

    Are there any such bikes still sold in the U.S.?
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I'm looking for a commuter bicycle for someone, something like the Giant GSR Trekking Gts (GSR
    > Trekking Gts, "http://www.bicyclemagic.com/products.php?show=140" which is not sold in the U.S..
    >
    > -Upright handlebars -No shocks -Mudguards -Fenders -Rack
    >
    > Are there any such bikes still sold in the U.S.?
    >

    Specialized Crossroads, you would have to add the fenders and rack yourself.
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  3. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    30 Jun 2003 12:23:45 -0700,
    <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Steven Scharf) wrote:

    >I'm looking for a commuter bicycle for someone, something like the Giant GSR Trekking Gts (GSR
    >Trekking Gts, "http://www.bicyclemagic.com/products.php?show=140" which is not sold in the U.S..
    >
    >-Upright handlebars -No shocks -Mudguards -Fenders -Rack
    >
    >Are there any such bikes still sold in the U.S.?

    Breezer's town bikes come with all that plus chainguard, kickstand lights and internal gear hubs.
    http://www.breezerbikes.com/
    --
    zk
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I'm looking for a commuter bicycle for someone, something like the Giant GSR Trekking Gts (GSR
    >Trekking Gts, "http://www.bicyclemagic.com/products.php?show=140" which is not sold in the U.S..
    >
    >-Upright handlebars -No shocks -Mudguards -Fenders -Rack
    >
    >Are there any such bikes still sold in the U.S.?

    You may want to look at www.vandesselsports.com under city bikes. You will have to add your own rack
    and fenders. I have a super fly and I have been happy with it the 3 months I have owned it.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  5. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 18:15:56 -0400, Alex Rodriguez <[email protected]> from Your Organization wrote:

    >You may want to look at www.vandesselsports.com under city bikes. You will have to add your own
    >rack and fenders. I have a super fly and I have been happy with it the 3 months I have owned it.
    >-----------------
    >Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)

    ^ ^

    Even riding on two flat tires?

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace TAPPING? You POLITICIANS! Don't you realize
    that the END of the "Wash Cycle" is a TREASURED MOMENT for most people?!
    7:37:21 PM 30 June 2003
     
  6. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    On 30 Jun 2003 12:23:45 -0700, [email protected] (Steven Scharf) wrote:

    >I'm looking for a commuter bicycle for someone, something like the Giant GSR Trekking Gts (GSR
    >Trekking Gts, "http://www.bicyclemagic.com/products.php?show=140" which is not sold in the U.S..
    >
    >-Upright handlebars -No shocks -Mudguards -Fenders -Rack
    >
    >Are there any such bikes still sold in the U.S.?

    Ignore any suggestions to buy some bike and add your own rack, fenders, etc.

    As noted the Breezer is your American choice. See it here:
    http://www.breezerbikes.com/townframe1.html My problem with Breezer is he makes you take a front
    shock if you want a dynamo hub.

    Bicycle Habitat in NYC is now selling the Skeppshult of Sweden. I don't see it at their web site.
    (So I just e-mailed Charlie and asked him to put it up.) See it at www.skeppshultbikes.com.

    You can also buy a Kettler (made in Germany) here: http://giftwarehouse.com/mensbicycles.html or
    here: http://www.bikesatvienna.com/outside/ or e-mail RD ROSETE <[email protected]> for a
    catalog. He'll also sell one to you.

    As for myself, I went bicycling in Holland a couple weeks ago. I brought back this one as a
    souvenir: http://www.batavus.nl/2002/collectie/bike.asp?bikeid=408 The best city bike Batavus makes
    without shocks.

    Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
     
  7. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    On Mon, 30 Jun 2003, Alex Rodriguez <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] says...
    >>
    >>-Upright handlebars -No shocks -Mudguards -Fenders -Rack
    >>
    >>Are there any such bikes still sold in the U.S.?
    >
    >You may want to look at www.vandesselsports.com under city bikes. You will have to add your own
    >rack and fenders. I have a super fly and I have been happy with it the 3 months I have owned it.

    Pretty low for upright handlebars. And no chainguard. And it states it has an integrated front
    suspension.

    Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
     
  8. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    On 30 Jun 2003 12:23:45 -0700, [email protected] (Steven Scharf) wrote:

    >I'm looking for a commuter bicycle for someone, something like the Giant GSR Trekking Gts (GSR
    >Trekking Gts, "http://www.bicyclemagic.com/products.php?show=140" which is not sold in the U.S..
    >
    >-Upright handlebars -No shocks -Mudguards -Fenders -Rack
    >
    >Are there any such bikes still sold in the U.S.?

    Also the Kronan at: http://www.kronancycle.com/kronanusa/home.html But it is on the heavy side.

    Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
     
  9. Raymo853

    Raymo853 Guest

    In the end it will be cheaper for you to buy a hybrid with some of those features and then add what
    is missing. Say get a Specialized Crossroads w/o fenders and a rack and then just but them yourself.

    "Steven Scharf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm looking for a commuter bicycle for someone, something like the Giant GSR Trekking Gts (GSR
    > Trekking Gts, "http://www.bicyclemagic.com/products.php?show=140" which is not sold in the U.S..
    >
    > -Upright handlebars -No shocks -Mudguards -Fenders -Rack
    >
    > Are there any such bikes still sold in the U.S.?
     
  10. Kevin

    Kevin Guest

    I know what you're asking for, and there are some really good recommendations.

    But how far are you commuting, and why not look for a lighter bike and outfit it for all weather
    commuting. Look into a Fuji Touring on the low cost side, and a Trek 510 on the mid budget.
    Specialized Crossroads is good, but this and all hybreds in in a different league. Look at a Trek
    XO-1. Again outfit it for commuting and go.

    No low spoke count wheels for commuting. 32 minimum, 36 is best.

    "Steven Scharf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm looking for a commuter bicycle for someone, something like the Giant GSR Trekking Gts (GSR
    > Trekking Gts, "http://www.bicyclemagic.com/products.php?show=140" which is not sold in the U.S..
    >
    > -Upright handlebars -No shocks -Mudguards -Fenders -Rack
    >
    > Are there any such bikes still sold in the U.S.?
     
  11. Jacques

    Jacques Guest

    > Ignore any suggestions to buy some bike and add your own rack, fenders,

    OK but check that you have room + all needed attachments to add rack etc... On some bikes it may be
    almost impossible to add some pieces of equipment.
     
  12. On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 21:21:59 -0400, Don Wiss <[email protected]_spam.com> wrote:

    >As for myself, I went bicycling in Holland a couple weeks ago. I brought back this one as a
    >souvenir: http://www.batavus.nl/2002/collectie/bike.asp?bikeid=408 The best city bike Batavus makes
    >without shocks.

    That's a pretty luxurious Batavus. I personally quite like my '85 model year Gazelle..

    Jasper
     
  13. On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 21:49:20 -0400, Don Wiss <[email protected]_spam.com> wrote:

    >Also the Kronan at: http://www.kronancycle.com/kronanusa/home.html But it is on the heavy side.

    And it doesn't have proper brakes. Major point against, IMHO, though they are utterly bombproof
    bikes. The Dutch version now comes either in the classic coaster/singlespeed or with a 3speed
    nexus/rollerbrake arrangement.

    Jasper
     
  14. Don Wiss <[email protected]_spam.com> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 30 Jun 2003 12:23:45 -0700, [email protected] (Steven Scharf) wrote:
    >
    > >I'm looking for a commuter bicycle for someone, something like the Giant GSR Trekking Gts (GSR
    > >Trekking Gts, "http://www.bicyclemagic.com/products.php?show=140" which is not sold in the U.S..
    > >
    > >-Upright handlebars -No shocks -Mudguards -Fenders -Rack
    > >
    > >Are there any such bikes still sold in the U.S.?
    >
    > Ignore any suggestions to buy some bike and add your own rack, fenders, etc.

    Yeah, I was going to put that in the original message, but I wanted to see how many people suggested
    it! I've been commuting on a road bike, but I can't go the best route with it, as part of the best
    route is an off-road freeway underpass in Santa Clara. My old touring bike is okay for this, but
    it's way too heavy.

    > As noted the Breezer is your American choice. See it here:
    > http://www.breezerbikes.com/townframe1.html My problem with Breezer is he makes you take a front
    > shock if you want a dynamo hub.
    >
    > Bicycle Habitat in NYC is now selling the Skeppshult of Sweden. I don't see it at their web site.
    > (So I just e-mailed Charlie and asked him to put it up.) See it at www.skeppshultbikes.com.

    This web site does not work due to some sort of dispute.

    > You can also buy a Kettler (made in Germany) here: http://giftwarehouse.com/mensbicycles.html or
    > here: http://www.bikesatvienna.com/outside/ or e-mail RD ROSETE <[email protected]> for a
    > catalog. He'll also sell one to you.

    Yes, I may go this route, or go to Germany to get one. Momovelo in Berkeley also sells them.

    > As for myself, I went bicycling in Holland a couple weeks ago. I brought back this one as a
    > souvenir: http://www.batavus.nl/2002/collectie/bike.asp?bikeid=408 The best city bike Batavus
    > makes without shocks.

    Cool, too bad DPC won't work over here! I may just fly over to Europe to buy something. I have
    enough miles to do so, and it seems like it will be a better option.

    One amusing thing I found while looking is that one speed bicycles are required by law to have
    chainguards in the U.S.
     
  15. Effi

    Effi Guest

    "Steven Scharf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]... (snippage)
    > One amusing thing I found while looking is that one speed bicycles are required by law to have
    > chainguards in the U.S.

    required to be sold with chainguards? or required to have them while the bicycle is being used?

    sound like just one more dumb law on the books to keep the not so bright lawyers fully employed
     
  16. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    On 2 Jul 2003 12:01:10 -0700, [email protected] (Steven Scharf) wrote:

    >Don Wiss wrote:

    >> As for myself, I went bicycling in Holland a couple weeks ago. I brought back this one as a
    >> souvenir: http://www.batavus.nl/2002/collectie/bike.asp?bikeid=408 The best city bike Batavus
    >> makes without shocks.
    >
    >Cool, too bad DPC won't work over here!

    Just what is this? Other than a fancy label on my frame. Everything I have on it is in Dutch.

    >I may just fly over to Europe to buy something. I have enough miles to do so, and it seems like it
    >will be a better option.

    I ended up with a Batavus, as the Gazelle dealer I went into did not have any of the model I wanted.
    Since I did not research this before going over, I didn't have a list of dealers to hunt down. Nor
    did I want to spend the time doing so. (It was mostly an impulse purchase, though I had been
    thinking about it, and I did want a utilitarian bike.) I do think Gazelle is a catchier name.

    The main difference that I could tell was I got the high-end gel seat on my bike. Gazelle doesn't
    give that to you unless you go for the model with shocks. Someday people will wake up and realize
    that shocks on a street bike are nothing but a waste of one's energy. And then refuse to buy them.

    Many Dutch are interested in buying non-Dutch bikes. Popular are Treks and Giant. You can see the
    Trek global bikes at www.trekbikes.com. Their city bikes seem to vary from country to country. But
    they won't sell you one here in the US. An example:
    http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2003/citybike/l300e.jsp

    One bit of advice if you go over and get one. The Nexus hub gears have the center gear ratio equal
    to a one-gear bike. This gives you high gears you don't need, and the lows aren't low enough for
    American hills. A larger freewheel is only 7.50 Euros. I wish I had picked up a couple when there.
    But stores are closed on Sunday and Monday, and I left early Tuesday. Now I have ordered the next
    two larger sizes and I'm waiting for them to be shipped over.

    Also I have applied for a VAT refund. At Schiphol, next to where I bought the bike box for 20 Euros,
    is the place to get your paperwork stamped. Then you have to mail the original back for a refund. In
    my case this is 122 Euros. The bike was 764 Euros (899 Euros less 15%). Purchased in Rotterdam not
    too far from the train station.

    If you do go and bike around the countryside, by far the best maps to get are the ANWB 1:50,000 bike
    topo maps. 11.95 Euros for a set of four. And bring a compass. (More info and help from me available
    on request.)

    Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
     
  17. On Wed, 02 Jul 2003 20:18:12 -0400, Don Wiss <[email protected]_spam.com> wrote:
    >On 2 Jul 2003 12:01:10 -0700, [email protected] (Steven Scharf) wrote:

    >I ended up with a Batavus, as the Gazelle dealer I went into did not have any of the model I
    >wanted. Since I did not research this before going over, I didn't have a list of dealers to hunt
    >down. Nor did I want to spend the time doing so. (It was mostly an impulse purchase, though I had
    >been thinking about it, and I did want a utilitarian bike.) I do think Gazelle is a catchier name.

    Batavus refers to the Bataven, a people that lived here under the Romans, and which are essentially
    considered to be one of our earliest direct ancestors. As a name, though it doesn't mean much to an
    American, it is far more location specific than "Gazelle" is.

    >One bit of advice if you go over and get one. The Nexus hub gears have the center gear ratio equal
    >to a one-gear bike. This gives you high gears you don't need, and the lows aren't low enough for
    >American hills. A larger freewheel is only 7.50 Euros. I wish I had picked up a couple when there.
    >But stores are closed on Sunday and Monday, and I left early Tuesday. Now I have ordered the next
    >two larger sizes and I'm waiting for them to be shipped over.

    The nexus hubs if I recall correctly use the same sprocket type as Sturmey 3speeds and coaster brake
    bikes, so your LBS probably has them as well.

    >If you do go and bike around the countryside, by far the best maps to get are the ANWB 1:50,000
    >bike topo maps. 11.95 Euros for a set of four. And bring a compass. (More info and help from me
    >available on request.)

    The ANWB 1:150:000 bike maps aren't bad either for long distance touring.

    Jasper
     
  18. Don Wiss <[email protected]_spam.com> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 2 Jul 2003 12:01:10 -0700, [email protected] (Steven Scharf) wrote:
    >
    > >Don Wiss wrote:
    >
    > >> As for myself, I went bicycling in Holland a couple weeks ago. I brought back this one as a
    > >> souvenir: http://www.batavus.nl/2002/collectie/bike.asp?bikeid=408 The best city bike Batavus
    > >> makes without shocks.
    > >
    > >Cool, too bad DPC won't work over here!
    >
    > Just what is this? Other than a fancy label on my frame. Everything I have on it is in Dutch.

    It is a theft prevention chip embedded in the bicycle.
     
  19. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    On Thu, 03 Jul 2003, Jasper Janssen <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wed, 02 Jul 2003 20:18:12 -0400, Don Wiss wrote:

    >>If you do go and bike around the countryside, by far the best maps to get are the ANWB 1:50,000
    >>bike topo maps. 11.95 Euros for a set of four. And bring a compass. (More info and help from me
    >>available on request.)
    >
    >The ANWB 1:150:000 bike maps aren't bad either for long distance touring.

    I am not into long distance touring. I can't see lugging my luggage around with me on the bike. So I
    spent four days each in Haarlem, Rotterdam, and Utrecht. I used the train to get between them. What
    is good about the
    1:50,000 bike maps is: (1) the routes are designed to go from town to town,
    (2) they really are the most scenic routes, and (3) the scale is manageable. I also bought the
    1:75,000 in a book form. The routes were not as scenic. And I found that scale lacked detail.
    Even with the 1:50,000 I needed to buy Falk or Cito maps to not get lost once I got into the
    city limits.

    I ended up bringing back many maps. Before my next trip I will pre-order what I need, so I don't
    waste time running around trying to find maps to buy. And I will be able to color photocopy some
    city detail in advance. For example, there is no good small color map for Utrecht. VVV sells one
    with no color, so you can't tell where the canals and parks are. The Falk/Cito are cumbersome.
    But the Cito has a city detail that photocopied would make an excellent one to use when in the
    city center.

    Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
     
  20. On Thu, 03 Jul 2003 20:30:08 -0400, Don Wiss <[email protected]_spam.com> wrote:
    >On Thu, 03 Jul 2003, Jasper Janssen <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>The ANWB 1:150:000 bike maps aren't bad either for long distance touring.
    >
    >I am not into long distance touring. I can't see lugging my luggage around with me on the bike. So
    >I spent four days each in Haarlem, Rotterdam, and Utrecht. I used the train to get between them.
    >What is good about the

    The latter is where I live, by the way.

    >1:50,000 bike maps is: (1) the routes are designed to go from town to town,
    >(2) they really are the most scenic routes, and (3) the scale is manageable. I also bought the
    > 1:75,000 in a book form. The routes were not as scenic. And I found that scale lacked detail.
    > Even with the 1:50,000 I needed to buy Falk or Cito maps to not get lost once I got into the
    > city limits.

    Yeah, they do have that. If you have a compass and/or GPS though, you shouldn't get *too* lost in
    the cities, mostly.

    >I ended up bringing back many maps. Before my next trip I will pre-order what I need, so I don't
    >waste time running around trying to find maps to buy. And I will be able to color photocopy some
    >city detail in advance. For example, there is no good small color map for Utrecht. VVV sells one
    >with no color, so you can't tell where the canals and parks are. The Falk/Cito are cumbersome.
    >But the Cito has a city detail that photocopied would make an excellent one to use when in the
    >city center.

    http://www.routenet.nl/ is the canonical route planner for cars, and its maps are pretty good for
    bikes as well. That only helps you if you're planning on going to a particular place and you can
    look it up on the 'net at leisure, though. There's a very large internet cafe in the back of the
    main post office in the middle of the city, if you want to look things up..

    Jasper
     
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