commuter coversion, what bike to convert?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by JOHN J, Feb 25, 2005.

  1. JOHN J

    JOHN J New Member

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    Good after noon every one. My Name is John I live in upstate NY

    Im new to the forum,but not to cycling.

    long story short Im riding again after a few years lapse and losing a lot of wt (got real fat after I changed jobs , im OK now (lost 70lb) .

    I own two bikes,

    one is a 1992 falcon road bike (competitor 105 model with a 531 frame and 531 fork) now equipt with ultegra 600. pretty aggresive gearing (that would have to go??)
    the shifters are on on the downtube ,custom set of drop bars ( wide shoulders)

    my other bike is a MTB, its a Giant ATX 760 with bar extensions and Thumb shifters (I god rid of the rapid fire shifters) this bike is smallest frame size Giant had in 1993. I have a heavy rear rack on the giant at the moment.

    back when I bought these bikes I was either doing fast rides on bike trails/clean country roads/around parks with the falcon or I was doing serious mud/trail and snow riding with the giant I never did any commuting or city riding to speak of (I usually drove to where I was going to ride)

    currently when weather permits im riding in the city on errands and to work (14mi) and just plain old recreation riding to keep the weight off .

    a touring bike would be the best choice but I cant see getting a new bike when I have two very good machines to work with. I would also like to do longer rides say up 50 miles or so as a day trip on the modified bike.


    im sure this is old hat but my road bike is a bit frail (at least now)for potholes, gravel , dirt roads, curbs.... and the mountain bike is very clunky and not very comfy on longer rides or in wind and those fat tires on roads are a bit much.

    I see lots of web pages on conversions but im not sure what would work with what I have.

    My local bike shop is fine to deal with but its a case of "we'd be happy to sell you anything you want but just tell us what" Or "if you want a touring /commuter bike wed be happy to sell you one" not alot of help in the "this will work dept"

    anyway whats the best route to go? (im thinking the Giant ??) and with what , I just need ideas as I can do all the work (gots all the tools)

    looks like a big issue is wheels/tires/ fenders/... my MTb tires are too big 1.95s the road bike tires too narrow 25mm. being out of the game I dont know whats availible ??

    many thanks and happy peddling "John"
     
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  2. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    Can you get fenders and a rack on your road bicycle?

    If not, what about fenders on your MTB?
    Smoother tires in the 1.25 - 1.75 range will help some, but why not just wear out the ones you currently have before swapping.... unless that make fenders difficult/impossible to mount.
     
  3. MattAussie66

    MattAussie66 New Member

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    I think that it is just as easy to do a "commute" conversion on either bike.
    It's a good idea to have a think about what you are going to be doing in
    a year or so.

    If you are thinking of doing some more demanding weekend roadwork
    then, consider that things in the road bike arena have changed a bit
    over the past few years and I'd guess that you may to want to get
    a technology injection. It is much better value for money to get a
    built up bike than change components - so in the not too distant future
    you may have your 531 roadie sitting in the back of the shed doing
    nothing.

    So, I would convert the road bike into the commute bike,
    by only changing the cluster, (which is what I did) mudguards are
    nice but not mandatory, you are going to get wet/muddy anyway,
    get some slightly fatter tires (25mm?) if you are worried about potholes,
    or use them to practice your bike handling - potholes are your friends.

    ttfn
    Matthew
     
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