Commuting Bag



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Richard Ney

Guest
Any recommendations from bike commuters out there on a good bag in which to carry small items and
maybe a change of clothes when commuting?
 
A

Alex Rodriguez

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

>Any recommendations from bike commuters out there on a good bag in which to carry small items and
>maybe a change of clothes when commuting?

I prefer to have a rack and then attach a bag to the rack. It is more comfortable riding without a
pack on my back.
-----------------
Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
 
D

Dick

Guest
I second that, rack bag combination is good but it does mess with the bike handling quite a bit. If
you are going to us a pack then go with a real backpack and not a messenger bag. I have a cdale bag
with a nice helmet holder built in, a little ventalation on the back to keep the sweat down and lots
of reflective bits. It has served me quite well.

Alex Rodriguez wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
>
>
>>Any recommendations from bike commuters out there on a good bag in which to carry small items and
>>maybe a change of clothes when commuting?
>
>
> I prefer to have a rack and then attach a bag to the rack. It is more comfortable riding without a
> pack on my back.
> -----------------
> Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
 
P

Per ElmsäTer

Guest
Richard Ney wrote:
> Any recommendations from bike commuters out there on a good bag in which to carry small items and
> maybe a change of clothes when commuting?

I tried all sorts of bike mounted bags for several years and they either broke or had a bunch of
**** sticking straight out int the air when the bag wasn't attached.. Then I finally decided to
get a CamelBak M.U.L.E. It is really nice and I barely notice it on my back. It's enough to bring
a set of spare clothes and a towel plus pockets for keys and wallets etc. Mind you there will not
be enough room for an extra pair of shoes unless you hang them on the outside, which is easily
done. Then of course I can always bring 3 liters of cool water when I decide to take a detour on
the way home.

I am considering getting a big bag from CamelBak now. Maybe something like the TransAlp. Ive found
that I often need to bring double sets of training clothes towels and workout shoes if I intend on
stopping by the gym for instance. Also if I go somewhere where there isn't a locker waiting for me
it's good to be able to bring everything.

CamelBaks fit really nicely on my back and I don't mind carrying them at all. As far as the weight
goes it's only extra training. A M.U.L.E. weighs less than a kilo ( 0.73 or something ) empty

--
Perre

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2

#215

Guest
try www.crumpler.com.au The best!

"Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Richard Ney wrote:
> > Any recommendations from bike commuters out there on a good bag in which to carry small items
> > and maybe a change of clothes when commuting?
>
> I tried all sorts of bike mounted bags for several years and they either broke or had a bunch of
> **** sticking straight out int the air when the
bag
> wasn't attached.. Then I finally decided to get a CamelBak M.U.L.E. It is really nice and I barely
> notice it on my back. It's enough to bring a set
of
> spare clothes and a towel plus pockets for keys and wallets etc. Mind you there will not be enough
> room for an extra pair of shoes unless you hang them on the outside, which is easily done. Then of
> course I can always
bring
> 3 liters of cool water when I decide to take a detour on the way home.
>
> I am considering getting a big bag from CamelBak now. Maybe something like the TransAlp. Ive found
> that I often need to bring double sets of training clothes towels and workout shoes if I intend on
> stopping by the gym for instance. Also if I go somewhere where there isn't a locker waiting for me
> it's good to be able to bring everything.
>
> CamelBaks fit really nicely on my back and I don't mind carrying them at all. As far as the weight
> goes it's only extra training. A M.U.L.E.
weighs
> less than a kilo ( 0.73 or something ) empty
>
> --
> Perre
>
> Remove and/or replace the DOTs as needed to reply
 
L

Lawrence Fieman

Guest
"Richard Ney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Any recommendations from bike commuters out there on a good bag in which to carry small items and
> maybe a change of clothes ....

After trying panniers, backpack, and "messenger" style bag, I finally settled on a Carradice Camper.
Sometime I use the SQR (quick release) system, depending on the bike and saddle. The only
disadvantage of this bag is that, in addition to a change of clothes, tools, etc, I tend to carry
too much other junk. I've both commuted regularly with the Carradice and gone on solo centuries.

Regards, Larry "prone to iBOBish tendencies" Fieman
 
D

Dan Gillette

Guest
I have tried all forms of bags for commuting -- messenger bags (both standard and custom), normal
daypacks, ***** bags and rack bags. I now have a Chrome Ranchero
(http://www.chromebags.com/ranchero.html) and think it is the best solution. The bag is very
comfortable while riding, doesn't twist my back like a courier bag, but I can get into the bag
easily without taking it all the way of (I leave it over one shoulder), which is something not
easily done with most daypacks. Also, the pocket set up is the best I have seen, with tubular
pockets on the sides that hold cell phones, water bottles, PDAs, etc. out of harms way, and pen and
wallet pockets that are easily accessible. It's a double bag and waterproof. There is a bigger and
smaller size, as well. If you want an over the shoulder bag, I'd check out Chrome's and also those
made by PAC, but in the long run I think you'd be happier with a two shoulder bag.

- Dan

"Richard Ney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Any recommendations from bike commuters out there on a good bag in which to carry small items and
> maybe a change of clothes when commuting?
 
S

Sparetire

Guest
Hi, Take a look at the Banana Bag from Rivendellbicycles.com and maybe you'll get some ideas.

A small backpack is quite nice if the weather is not to warm, a saddlebag from Carradice or Baggins
is stylish and convenient.

A small handlebar bag is also good fro small light items.

sc

"Richard Ney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Any recommendations from bike commuters out there on a good bag in which to carry small items and
> maybe a change of clothes when commuting?
 
P

Per ElmsäTer

Guest
#215 wrote:
> try www.crumpler.com.au The best!
>

Well I got a good laugh out of the entry to the website ;) The bags themselves looked pretty much
like messenger bags made by an old skydiver. I think a backpack should be evenly and symmetrically
fastened to your back at as many points as possible to keep it in place when the ride gets rough or
you change positions etc.

Maybe I missed the good stuff 'cause I was laughing so hard.

--
Perre

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M

Martin Nisshage

Guest
Captain's log. On StarDate 9 Apr 2003 09:34:30 -0700 received comm from "[email protected] (Richard Ney)
on channel rec.bicycles.tech ":

: Any recommendations from bike commuters out there on a good bag in which to carry small items and
: maybe a change of clothes when commuting?

For bike fitted bags check out: http://www.carradice.co.uk/sqr-products.htm

I have the SQR Tour and it's a great bag, and easy to remove when you don't need
it.

For back packs I know some cycling friends who likes their Deuter bags very much:
http://www.deuter.com/

Best regards,

m a r t i n | n

--
Martin Nisshagen - http://194.236.153.211/
 
M

Matt O'Toole

Guest
"Richard Ney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> Any recommendations from bike commuters out there on a
good bag in
> which to carry small items and maybe a change of clothes
when
> commuting?

Try here:

http://www.patagonia.com/store/specials/

I have the one the next size up from the Habanero, and it's terrific. Lots of pockets besides the 3
main ones to keep stuff organized, a dedicated Camelback bladder pocket, etc. I carry loads as small
as newspapers, or as large as 20 LB of groceries, and it's perfectly comfortable either way. If
anything, it's bigger than necessary. So the next size down, like the one shown, should do you fine.
There are plenty of others there, too.

Of course, all backpacks are sweaty compared to bike bags, but you don't have to mess with racks,
you can take your stuff with you, and you don't have to make adjustments in bike handling.

Matt O.
 
D

Drifter

Guest
It is a no win situation. Panniers are great but awkard to carry to bars, restaurants, coffee shops
or stores. Backpack/bags can be heavy, awkward and hot.

Over time you will need a small variety of bags/options as the needs arise and change.

Keeping extra clothes at work is ideal. Lugging clothes to work is never fun. Carrying rain pants
is enough.

For extra light weight, I have standard camel pack size. I can carry occasionally a thermos, book,
walkman, patch kit/wrench, rain pants. In the rain I wear it under my gortex jacket - recent
discovery - and this keeps it dry in the pouring rain. Quite versatile and handy as long as you
don't try to carry too much. It is not different than touring. Put out only the essentials and take
half of that!

This may sound gross, but carrying a small roll of duct tape and a few garbage bags means you can
carry almost anything in any weather unexpectedly on your rear rack - groceries, beer, found items!

Richard Ney wrote:
>
> Any recommendations from bike commuters out there on a good bag in which to carry small items and
> maybe a change of clothes when commuting?
 
T

Trevor M

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
> It is a no win situation. Panniers are great but awkard to carry to bars, restaurants, coffee
> shops or stores. Backpack/bags can be heavy, awkward and hot.
>
> Over time you will need a small variety of bags/options as the needs arise and change.
>
>
They can be, but the best one I've found isn't either. It's sometimes called an Ameribag and
sometimes a Healthy Back bag. There are several different styles and materials of them listed on
Healthyback.com. I've found mine to be pretty much ideal. I have one of the tech bags.

trevor me

to email me, don't
 
M

Morgan Fletcher

Guest
I use medium and large timbuk2 messenger bags. They work great. My round trip commute is 38 miles on
the road. The bag has never been a problem. It has good reflectors, optional cellphone holder in
front on the strap, nice compartments, is waterproof, durable and simple.

http://www.timbuk2.com/

Morgan
 
B

Bt

Guest
It would be better if there is a lockable case like those used in motorcycles which one can leave
with the bike and not having to carry around when one leave the bike. I am not too sure such case
are available for bicycle.

"trevor m" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
> > It is a no win situation. Panniers are great but awkard to carry to bars, restaurants, coffee
> > shops or stores. Backpack/bags can be heavy, awkward and hot.
> >
> > Over time you will need a small variety of bags/options as the needs arise and change.
> >
> >
> They can be, but the best one I've found isn't either. It's sometimes called an Ameribag and
> sometimes a Healthy Back bag. There are several different styles and materials of them listed on
> Healthyback.com. I've found mine to be pretty much ideal. I have one of the tech bags.
>
> trevor me
>
> to email me, don't
 
L

Lawrence Fieman

Guest
"bt" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> It would be better if there is a lockable case like those used in motorcycles ..

I have such a case. It was made by Vetta, at least 15 years ago, and bolts on to a rear rack.

Regards, Larry
 
P

Pelufo

Guest
Here's a Crumpler deal:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=11170&item=2724940778&rd=1 "Per Elmsäter"
<[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> #215 wrote:
> > try www.crumpler.com.au The best!
> >
>
> Well I got a good laugh out of the entry to the website ;) The bags themselves looked pretty much
> like messenger bags made by an old skydiver. I think a backpack should be evenly and symmetrically
> fastened to your back at as many points as possible to keep it in place when the ride gets rough
> or you change positions etc.
>
> Maybe I missed the good stuff 'cause I was laughing so hard.
 
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