Commuting Bike

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by thepeddler, May 13, 2007.

  1. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Messages:
    2,307
    Likes Received:
    0
    Here it is. The road MTB. Shimano and Campagnolo. 105, Ultegra, DuraAce, Deore DX, Deore XT, 600 and Veloce. Steel, aluminium, carbon fibre and titanium.
     


  2. 1id10t

    1id10t New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Messages:
    343
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think the quote is 'Just Do It'.
    Yeah, am leaning towards it.
     
  3. 1id10t

    1id10t New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Messages:
    343
    Likes Received:
    0
    Cool.
    Seeing it makes me want to put my own one together. Doubt I could sweet talk my wife into letting me get a cyclocross at the moment so this could be the next best thing. As you said in a previous post I like the idea of having a surefooted bike for rougher terrain but with the more aero position.
    Thanks for sharing the picture.
     
  4. xxamr_corpxx

    xxamr_corpxx New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Messages:
    327
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wow! I'm very tempted now to do the same thing.

    Did you have any issues with STIs and v-brakes? That's the main thing which is holding me back at the moment.
     
  5. thepeddler

    thepeddler New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2007
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi All,

    I am looking at test riding the Giant OCR 3 and the Trek 1000, although I have read some bad reports about the Trek 1000 front derailluer.

    It appears that the price I am looking at you will only get Sora level equipment on a road bike, which most people seem to poo-pah, yet the hybrids will give you top level mountain bike type groupsets.

    So I guess I have a few options if I want to go road bike with good components. I could either win lotto, not feed the kids for a 2 ot 3 months (lol), or buy second hand.

    Hybrid seems to be winning the bike choice race so far.
     
  6. cluster blaster

    cluster blaster New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2005
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hm, I really don't know what your budget is but you can get a complete Surly CrossCheck for $1495 RRP. That's an awsome bike for commuting and touring too. It will beat any new bike from Giant by miles and miles....

    Another good choice is Mongoose Randonneur. I haven't seen the prices lately, but you should be able to get one somewhere in the $1200-1400 range I believe.

    Both of these bikes will be fast enough on road and can be taken for some unsealed road cycling. Both can take seriously wide tyres (37mm with ease) and a rear rack. These are strong bikes built to take some beating, both have strong wheels. CrossCheck is better equipped and offers more race-bike like riding position, Mongoose Randonneur is still good enough for most of rides out there and may even be more comfortable for a newbie, because it is has a shorter top tube so you sit more upright.



     
  7. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Messages:
    2,307
    Likes Received:
    0
    The STI/v-brake combination is very powerful, but you need to take all measures to prevent the lever from "bottoming-out" on the bar. The rim needs to to be perfectly true and undamaged. The pads need to be as close as possible to the rim without rubbing. The calipers need to be be perfectly centered. I've haven't used it in the wet yet - I'll let you know. If all else fails, you can use a "Travel Agent" or "Problem Solver".
    Don't forget that a Shimano left shifter won't drive an MTB FD - you need a road FD, or else bar ends/ drop tube friction shift or Campy left shifter.
     
  8. robalert

    robalert New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2005
    Messages:
    378
    Likes Received:
    0
    Very interesting read. This is my experience, Been commuting daily for the last few years from Eastwood to Parra... approx 24-30km round trip depending on route.

    The bikes I have commuted on include...

    04 Giant VT3 dual suspension with 700C rims and 28C tyres
    Review: To heavy and slow on hills, too much bob, generally, DON'T get a dually for commuting. Ended up wearing out the drivetrain from it and had to replace everything. Why did I do it? I was getting back into riding and had a bad back. The upright position with cushy riding just made it pain free but not helpful with speed or efficiency.

    96 Apollo Himalya with 26x1.3 ContiContactSports/Specialised Fatboys, EA50 stem/bar/seatpost, racks/panniers
    Review: this has done most of the mileage and is now awaiting a rebuild. The rims are worn from braking, hubs are buggered. I rode in rain or shine. Overall, hardtails are great for commuting because they are very robust, upright seating position and great for racks. Lockout fork is a must for road riding... so I went from a RST381 fork (which was pretty much useless) to a Manitou R7 Super with remote lockout. Upside? Robust, can jump gutters, super stable, amazing pick up at lights, quick handling... Downsides?... heavy, geometry not ideal for standing climbs, 26inch wheels roll slower, stiff, Alivio 21spd doesn't have the topend

    '06 Giant CRX1: commute with this bike now and got 2 wheelsets, R550s (11-23 cassette) with MichelinProRace for weekend rides and R500s (12-27 cassette) with ContiGatorskins for commuting. Runs compact cranks 34/50.
    Review: I love this bike. Initially, the angles were quite steep compared to my mtb but I got used to it. I've added ski bar ends giving me plenty of hand positions without needing to bend down any further, also can quickly access brakes and shifters. I found the ride is very dependant on the tyres, with 28C, it gives you a bit more security and cushioning but not losing too much speed but I still love the pace of lighter wheels for weekend fast rides. I think it is a very versatile bike. The frame is virtually identical to the OCR but a little stronger and more room in the rear stays and more robust/fogiving fork. Also, you have eyelets which anything from an OCR1 up doesn't have. The Vbrakes are much more powerful than the road brakes. I go on many group ride, hilly ones up to 100kms and it is fine keeping up with the roadies. You won't be in a the lead but you can certainly keep the pace. Apparently the build is strong enough for light offroading. Pros: Fast with control, still not as fast as a drop bar but close..... Cons: a bit flashy to be parked around, can't jump gutters at speed, not as stable as the mtb.

    04 Giant Elwood: This is the wife's bike, when I now commute a short distance and don't bother with cycling gear I choose this bike. Essentially, it is only good for up 20km/h crusing around. The Altus level gearing is CRAP, and upright position is hopeless for building up speed or climbing with any pace. The suspension forks are so flexy, I am not game to corner at speed. Pros: supercushy for short distances, park it anywhere cause it is only $350. Cons: weight, quality and so on. Make sure you get something at least Deore/Tiagra level if you are using the bike seriously.

    I also have a DMR trailstar but DJ bikes are at best only good for offroading

    I have ridden my brother's TCR1, great pace but too harsh and the angles are too severe for my back. Also my gut touches my thighs when I ride on the drops... SO, you can imagine how fat I am :p

    For commuting and non competitive riding, I would definitely go a CRX2 and up or a OCR 2. Of course there are other options available in the other brands but it is too hard to recommend when I have ridden them.
     
  9. Wrightstuff

    Wrightstuff New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2004
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    Very similar set up is some way to my 05 Specialized Sirrus Pro which has a compact frame and also the compact crankset. It also has Avid Juicy 5 hydro-disc brakes, which are also very powerful and brilliant for commuting, especially the wet.It also has rack mounts (F&R) to which I could add, but I like to keep the bike wt down and use a messenger bag to hold all the stuff I carry when commuting. I have been using various brand tyres (all 700c x 23) and am using ContiGP4000's at the moment. Had the bike for just two years and done 28k km on it and I love it. Very similar performance wrt speed in groups to the giant, but that is probably me, not the bike. Normally average 28-29 km/h in solo 100+ km rides, so I am happy with that overall performance.

    PS, Being the wrong side of 40 (ie, the eyes are not what they used to be!!), and with recent experience with a puncture at night and helping a bloke last night with a punture under a streetlight, I would recommend carrying a spare folding tyre, only adds another 200 gms of weight to carry, but may save a bit of aggro at this time of year.
     
  10. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Messages:
    2,307
    Likes Received:
    0
    Works well in the wet.
     
  11. robalert

    robalert New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2005
    Messages:
    378
    Likes Received:
    0
    By the way. i picked up my CRX1 for $1,000

    How much was the Sirrus? Last I checked it was better built but a fair bit more exxy.
     
  12. Wrightstuff

    Wrightstuff New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2004
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    The Sirrus cost me $2,600 after changing the saddle and putting some carbon bar end on, and without pedals. Tis a good bike, but had some issues with the FSA BB on the compact crankset which seemed to need replacing every 5-6 k km. I changed to a Shimano compact crankset & BB recently as the chainrings were getting worn, and hopefully will get better endurance from the BB.

    The CRX range is similar to the Specialized Sirrus range and possibly better value (haven't checked for a while- my SO would kill me if I even was considering looking at a new bike- even if it was for her!). When I got the bike, the maintanance service at a very local LBS was also part of my decision consideration.

    BTW, I have roughly worked out it costs me about $.10/km ie ten cents per km to maintain the bike (tyres, chain, cassette, brake pads, etc). Is this similar to others experience ?
     
  13. robalert

    robalert New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2005
    Messages:
    378
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sounds like ur Sirrus is higher specced

    I've added a few things on my CRX1 since getting it, a Specialised Body Geometry seat, carbon fibre drink holders, Sigma BC1600 speedo
     
  14. peterlip

    peterlip New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2005
    Messages:
    357
    Likes Received:
    0
    Interesting stat. Never thought about it that way. So, I've done some maths. In the last 12 months, two bikes have cost me $0.077/km. I'm assuming you're not including bike purchase cost. I didn't include the purchase of the GPS, that's hopefully a one off cost. One of the bikes is under 12 months old, so the maintenance for that one has been almost nothing.
    Mean while, the car is costing $0.196/km.
     
  15. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    0
    In my search for a touring bike I have tested both the cross check and randonneur. The randonneur is no longer in production is now being sold in the form of Viventi world tourer (steel frame).

    There are slight differences between the cross check and randonneur. For one the randonneur has a longer chainstay which gives better heel clearance. Frame material is different as well, Surly is 4130 steel, randonneur is alum. They are both made for different purpose, the Cross check designed for Cyclo-cross, and randonneur a tourer.

    I went with the randonneur, and build it up myself, I got 28C tyres on it, and it has a very relaxed geometry, and is my most comfortable bike. It makes a very good commuter bike, fast and stable under load.

    Some shops may be clearing the randonneur , I have seen one for sale $800 with Sora shifters.
     
  16. thepeddler

    thepeddler New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2007
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can you buy these bikes in Perth?
     
  17. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well I am pretty sure any good bike will be able to order them in for you. I have seen the Viventi World Tourer, and I think it comes in at $1500, with front and rear racks. It really is a touring specific bike.

    The Surly Cross check can be purchased as a frame fork. However, I am not sure if they come complete as a built up bike. Of course the shop should be able to build it up anyway to your specifications if needed.

    As to the comments about how these bikes will beat any Giant, I think if you get the right bike for the right job, you will find that the bike will be the best bike you ever rode, irrespective of brand.

    I feel that I should also mention the Surly Long Haul Trucker. This is Surly's dedicated touring frame/fork. I had my mind set on it, until I tested it for size, and the size that fit me came as 650C wheelsize frame.

    I was re-reading your original post, since you are going to be riding on sealed roads, you really dont need any suspension forks. Just running wider tyres at 80psi or so will give you a comfortable ride.

    Bottomline, once you have clearly defined your riding needs, dont waver and get confused by your riding wants!

    Easier said than done, as I have somehow accumulated 4 bikes.

    Feel free to email me at [email protected]_dot_com_dot_au

    cheers
     
  18. Wrightstuff

    Wrightstuff New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2004
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's mainly Ultegra specced, with carbon fork, bar, seat post and seat stays, with the rest ally frame. I never really found the BG saddle comfortable on long rides even though my MTB has one on it. I am using a SI Max Flite saddle. Adds to the bike since new are some Cateye lights, a Wireless Sigma BC1606, which is good even though the wireless cadence has not been working, and for this time of year a bloody good light at night for commuting. plus pumps.
    I was using Crank Bros Egg beater pedals for a while, but found that the bearings karked it after 5000 or so km, so have swapped back to Shimano SPD's on the road and the MTB.

    The BV ride magazine a couple of issues did a comparison of a couple of high specced FB road bikes, a Giant and an EPX (Look at their website). If I remember, the bikes characteristics were different, but both rated highly.
     
  19. Dancier

    Dancier New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2005
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0
  20. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the correction, it is a very nice bike! In my case, I purchased a mongoose randonneur frame, and then 3 days later found out that the World Randonneur was replacing it! Anyway I am quite happy with the aluminum framed Randonneur I got, does exactly what I want it to do.
     
Loading...
Loading...