Compare handling of 80's Atala Pro, Gios Torino, Basso Gap, Pro Miyata, Cinelli, Trek, Colnago...

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jeff Potter, Oct 15, 2004.

  1. Jeff Potter

    Jeff Potter Guest

    OK, I'm looking for a new road bike. A new old one. I like the 80's
    bikes.

    I've had a Pro Miyata forever and I like how it handles. I also had a
    Trek 760 and another sporty lugged Trek. Liked those, too. I didn't
    like an 80's Cannondale---too harsh.

    So I'm looking at a wide variety of nifty old top road bikes.

    Does anyone care to comment on how these various bikes rode and
    handled? Are they hugely different from each other?

    Atala Pro
    Gios Torino
    Basso Gap
    Pro Miyata
    Cinelli Super Corsa
    Trek 760
    Colnago
    Bridgestone RB1

    Thanks for your views!!! --JP

    outyourbackdoor.com
     
    Tags:


  2. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote:
    >OK, I'm looking for a new road bike. A new old one. I like the 80's
    >bikes.
    >
    >I've had a Pro Miyata forever and I like how it handles. I also had a
    >Trek 760 and another sporty lugged Trek. Liked those, too. I didn't
    >like an 80's Cannondale---too harsh.
    >
    >So I'm looking at a wide variety of nifty old top road bikes.
    >
    >Does anyone care to comment on how these various bikes rode and
    >handled? Are they hugely different from each other?
    >


    >Basso Gap


    _ I don't know about the rest, but I picked up a relatively new
    Basso Gap frame on Ebay this summer and it's very nice. It's
    definitely racy, but not unreasonably twitchy. I haven't been on
    any rides longer than about 3 hrs with it yet, but I don't get
    that "fighting" the bike sensation that sometimes get with racier
    bikes when you get tired. It's not as quite as "unconscious[1]"
    as a longer wheelbase bike, but it's not a radical change
    either. With reasonable components it build up into a 21lb
    bike. Plus the paint job is really nice....

    _ Booker C. Bense

    [1]- i.e. the bike just goes straight, no matter how tired and
    sloppy you get...




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  3. serg

    serg Guest

    well, i have an '93 rb1 with campy chorus/record parts and it handles great!
    i've taken it on long rides (4.5hrs) on flats, uphills and twisty downhills
    and love it! the handling is great. even on the long flat rides it felt
    fine. i understand the geometry is like japanese sport touring
    bikes...slacker seat angles and longish top tubes.
    i also have an older (mid 80's) bianchi with NR parts that felt much more
    twitchy on tight turns. then again, i was a new rider and the setup is not
    identical so...maybe i'll set it up again and give it another try...

    "Jeff Potter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > OK, I'm looking for a new road bike. A new old one. I like the 80's
    > bikes.
    >
    > I've had a Pro Miyata forever and I like how it handles. I also had a
    > Trek 760 and another sporty lugged Trek. Liked those, too. I didn't
    > like an 80's Cannondale---too harsh.
    >
    > So I'm looking at a wide variety of nifty old top road bikes.
    >
    > Does anyone care to comment on how these various bikes rode and
    > handled? Are they hugely different from each other?
    >
    > Atala Pro
    > Gios Torino
    > Basso Gap
    > Pro Miyata
    > Cinelli Super Corsa
    > Trek 760
    > Colnago
    > Bridgestone RB1
    >
    > Thanks for your views!!! --JP
    >
    > outyourbackdoor.com
     
  4. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Booker C. Bense wrote:

    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> OK, I'm looking for a new road bike. A new old one. I like the 80's
    >> bikes.
    >>
    >> I've had a Pro Miyata forever and I like how it handles. I also had a
    >> Trek 760 and another sporty lugged Trek. Liked those, too. I didn't
    >> like an 80's Cannondale---too harsh.
    >>
    >> So I'm looking at a wide variety of nifty old top road bikes.
    >>
    >> Does anyone care to comment on how these various bikes rode and
    >> handled? Are they hugely different from each other?
    >>

    >
    >> Basso Gap

    >
    > _ I don't know about the rest, but I picked up a relatively new
    > Basso Gap frame on Ebay this summer and it's very nice. It's
    > definitely racy, but not unreasonably twitchy. I haven't been on
    > any rides longer than about 3 hrs with it yet, but I don't get
    > that "fighting" the bike sensation that sometimes get with racier
    > bikes when you get tired.


    I used to borrow a friend's Basso Gap, which I enjoyed riding. I wouldn't call
    it twitchy either, despite the 75 degree head angle. However, I think Basso put
    a lot of effort into making them handle well, by matching the fork offset to
    each frame size.

    Also, it depends a lot on your own size. Taller riders get squeezed onto the
    same short wheelbase as everyone else. This is stupid, the result of a fetish
    with "racy" short wheelbases. As a result, race bikes get twitchier as riders
    and frame sizes get taller.

    > It's not as quite as "unconscious[1]"
    > as a longer wheelbase bike, but it's not a radical change
    > either. With reasonable components it build up into a 21lb
    > bike. Plus the paint job is really nice....


    Nice fillet brazing and nice lugs on the same bike, can't beat that!

    > [1]- i.e. the bike just goes straight, no matter how tired and
    > sloppy you get...


    Like my new Klein...

    Matt O.
     
  5. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Matt O'Toole <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Booker C. Bense wrote:
    >
    >> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    >>
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >>> OK, I'm looking for a new road bike. A new old one. I like the 80's
    >>> bikes.
    >>>
    >>> I've had a Pro Miyata forever and I like how it handles. I also had a
    >>> Trek 760 and another sporty lugged Trek. Liked those, too. I didn't
    >>> like an 80's Cannondale---too harsh.
    >>>
    >>> So I'm looking at a wide variety of nifty old top road bikes.
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone care to comment on how these various bikes rode and
    >>> handled? Are they hugely different from each other?
    >>>

    >>
    >>> Basso Gap

    >>
    >> _ I don't know about the rest, but I picked up a relatively new
    >> Basso Gap frame on Ebay this summer and it's very nice. It's
    >> definitely racy, but not unreasonably twitchy. I haven't been on
    >> any rides longer than about 3 hrs with it yet, but I don't get
    >> that "fighting" the bike sensation that sometimes get with racier
    >> bikes when you get tired.

    >
    >I used to borrow a friend's Basso Gap, which I enjoyed riding. I wouldn't call
    >it twitchy either, despite the 75 degree head angle. However, I think Basso put
    >a lot of effort into making them handle well, by matching the fork offset to
    >each frame size.
    >
    >Also, it depends a lot on your own size. Taller riders get squeezed onto the
    >same short wheelbase as everyone else. This is stupid, the result of a fetish
    >with "racy" short wheelbases. As a result, race bikes get twitchier as riders
    >and frame sizes get taller.
    >


    _ I've dabbled in a lot of sports over the years and it's really
    interesting that there's so little understanding of how things
    actually work and how unnecessary understanding them is to
    doing them. Skiing, biking and windsurfing all have in common
    that most of the people doing them don't really understand how
    they turn and how changes in the gear affect turning. If you have
    to think about it, you can't do it.

    _ Bicycles have been around for a relatively long time and
    perhaps outside of rowing was the first "gear" sport. Yet even
    after 100 years, there is no standard way of talking about bike
    handling. It's can't be that complicated, yet it seems to be so
    poorly understood, look at the drivel I wrote above. A bike is
    just a rather simple machine, there ought to be a way to quantify
    it. This dilemma suggests to me that we just haven't found the
    right metric. We're measuring isolated things and making profound
    statements based on them, when we should really be looking at
    some derived quanity based on an integration of the various
    measurements. For me that seems to be how wide my smile is
    after a 100 miles....

    _ Booker C. Bense

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