Compass to GPS to Compass.

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Tj, Jun 29, 2003.

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  1. Tj

    Tj Guest

    I just purchased a Garmin Rino 120 gps. I took it out today and rode West Bench trail over to
    another conector. What a great tool. I was able trace where I rode. I had an accurate moving
    average, elevation, stopped time, and moving time. It has a lot of great features that I have
    managed to live without. The trip odometer is great. What I don't like about this model is that if
    you want to get a bearing you need to be moving. I could have purchased the model with a digital
    compass, and a barometric altimeter. There is just no replacing a cheap seven dollar compass, and
    map reading skills.

    Anyone out there using GPS to trace new, or existing trails? If so what map software are you using?
    What model of GPS are you using?

    TJ the wannabe Cartographer

    www.gvii.net/hundtoft
     
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  2. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    > Anyone out there using GPS to trace new, or existing trails? If so what map software are you
    > using? What model of GPS are you using?
    >
    > TJ the wannabe Cartographer
    >
    > www.gvii.net/hundtoft

    the usual caveat is that GPS is no substitute for map and compass skills. That being said, we have
    an Etrex summit and software that was purchased originally for my husbands S &R work.

    Biking, we use it to upload a map after the ride, ( we ride in a lot of areas that are not well
    mapped) and make the elevation profile just for grins. I've been using the software for some trip
    planning for AMB-ID too...drawing routes freehand on the map, ( on trails) then looking at the
    profile to see just how rideable it might be.

    It's great fun to play with the maps. Sometimes we do a trail we've been riding for years, but since
    is isn't on ANY map it's just fun to see what it looks like.

    I have two sets of software: Nat Geo TOPO!! and Garmin Mapsource. The mapsource does road and
    topography, the ng stuff is based on USGS topo maps. The topo! map software provides the look and
    feel of the topo maps we all know and love. Mapsource, while doing highways and topography doesn't
    look the same at all when you get into the topography: it shows contours but not the details one
    gets used to. So I prefer TOPO, tho at $100/state it's not cheap. The only complaint I have about
    TOPO is that some of the maps the software is based on are dated.

    Here's a map we made riding "rollercoaster" . Note that the elev. profile is broken down in 25 foot
    increments so that every little whoopdedo shows up:
    www.specialtyoutdoors.com/images/rollercoaster.jpg

    Here's the map, an out and back with a little loop at the far end.
    www.specialtyoutdoors.com/images/rollercoastermap.jpg

    There's a lot of free software out there for organizing waypoints and so on. If you are not in the
    US, good mapping software becomes a lot harder to find.

    Penny
     
  3. Technician

    Technician Guest

    Penny S. <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > > Anyone out there using GPS to trace new, or existing trails? If so what map software are you
    > > using? What model of GPS are you using?
    > >
    > > TJ the wannabe Cartographer
    > >
    > > www.gvii.net/hundtoft
    >
    > the usual caveat is that GPS is no substitute for map and compass skills.

    And with that being said, i wonder how many folks forget to take the magnetic north correction into
    account when using a map.

    I think in maine is is like 14 degrees, but it has been a while since i used it so i forget. most
    good topo maps have that grids deviation listed i belive.
    --
    ~Travis

    http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  4. Tj

    Tj Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Anyone out there using GPS to trace new, or existing trails? If so what map software are you
    > > using? What model of GPS are you using?
    > >
    > > TJ the wannabe Cartographer
    > >
    > > www.gvii.net/hundtoft
    >
    > the usual caveat is that GPS is no substitute for map and compass skills. That being said, we have
    > an Etrex summit and software that was purchased originally for my husbands S &R work.
    >
    > Biking, we use it to upload a map after the ride, ( we ride in a lot of areas that are not well
    > mapped) and make the elevation profile just for grins. I've been using the software for some trip
    > planning for AMB-ID too...drawing routes freehand on the map, ( on trails) then looking at the
    > profile to see just how rideable it might be.
    >
    > It's great fun to play with the maps. Sometimes we do a trail we've been riding for years, but
    > since is isn't on ANY map it's just fun to see what
    it
    > looks like.
    >
    > I have two sets of software: Nat Geo TOPO!! and Garmin Mapsource. The mapsource does road and
    > topography, the ng stuff is based on USGS topo
    maps.
    > The topo! map software provides the look and feel of the topo maps we all know and love.
    > Mapsource, while doing highways and topography doesn't
    look
    > the same at all when you get into the topography: it shows contours but
    not
    > the details one gets used to. So I prefer TOPO, tho at $100/state it's
    not
    > cheap. The only complaint I have about TOPO is that some of the maps the software is based on
    > are dated.
    >
    > Here's a map we made riding "rollercoaster" . Note that the elev. profile
    is
    > broken down in 25 foot increments so that every little whoopdedo shows up:
    > www.specialtyoutdoors.com/images/rollercoaster.jpg
    >
    > Here's the map, an out and back with a little loop at the far end.
    > www.specialtyoutdoors.com/images/rollercoastermap.jpg
    >
    >
    > There's a lot of free software out there for organizing waypoints and so
    on.
    > If you are not in the US, good mapping software becomes a lot harder to find.
    >
    > Penny
    >
    >
    >
    >
    Cool. Thanks for the input. I was planning on using the Natgeo TOPO. I don't have the hundred bucks
    to drop on the cd set yet, but that is what I am going to do. I may put some of the more popular
    high country rides on maps for visiting friends.

    TJ
     
  5. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > > the usual caveat is that GPS is no substitute for map and compass
    skills.
    >
    > And with that being said, i wonder how many folks forget to take the magnetic north correction
    > into account when using a map.
    >
    > I think in maine is is like 14 degrees, but it has been a while since i used it so i forget. most
    > good topo maps have that grids deviation listed i belive.

    It gets pretty extreem, especially for those of you close to the northern shores
    http://www.nwes.com/solar_3.gif
     
  6. Reco Diver

    Reco Diver Guest

    "John Harlow" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > the usual caveat is that GPS is no substitute for map and compass
    > skills.
    > >
    > > And with that being said, i wonder how many folks forget to take the magnetic north correction
    > > into account when using a map.
    > >
    > > I think in maine is is like 14 degrees, but it has been a while since i used it so i forget.
    > > most good topo maps have that grids deviation listed i belive.
    >
    > It gets pretty extreem, especially for those of you close to the northern shores
    > http://www.nwes.com/solar_3.gif

    Not that declination matters for the short distance that most riders cover(particularly because they
    have to remain on a trail), but declination changes with time. If you want sub-decimeter accuracy in
    navigation (which was called for in my old job) check out NOAA's calculator.

    http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/seg/gmag/fldsnth1.pl

    R
     
  7. Bill Porter

    Bill Porter Guest

    On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 06:53:21 -0700, "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Anyone out there using GPS to trace new, or existing trails? If so what map software are you
    >> using? What model of GPS are you using?
    >>
    >> TJ the wannabe Cartographer
    >>
    >> www.gvii.net/hundtoft
    >
    >the usual caveat is that GPS is no substitute for map and compass skills. That being said, we have
    >an Etrex summit and software that was purchased originally for my husbands S &R work.
    >
    >Biking, we use it to upload a map after the ride, ( we ride in a lot of areas that are not well
    >mapped) and make the elevation profile just for grins. I've been using the software for some trip
    >planning for AMB-ID too...drawing routes freehand on the map, ( on trails) then looking at the
    >profile to see just how rideable it might be.
    >
    >It's great fun to play with the maps. Sometimes we do a trail we've been riding for years, but
    >since is isn't on ANY map it's just fun to see what it looks like.
    >
    >I have two sets of software: Nat Geo TOPO!! and Garmin Mapsource. The mapsource does road and
    >topography, the ng stuff is based on USGS topo maps. The topo! map software provides the look and
    >feel of the topo maps we all know and love. Mapsource, while doing highways and topography doesn't
    >look the same at all when you get into the topography: it shows contours but not the details one
    >gets used to. So I prefer TOPO, tho at $100/state it's not cheap. The only complaint I have about
    >TOPO is that some of the maps the software is based on are dated.
    >
    >Here's a map we made riding "rollercoaster" . Note that the elev. profile is broken down in 25 foot
    >increments so that every little whoopdedo shows up:
    >www.specialtyoutdoors.com/images/rollercoaster.jpg
    >
    >Here's the map, an out and back with a little loop at the far end.
    >www.specialtyoutdoors.com/images/rollercoastermap.jpg
    >
    >
    >There's a lot of free software out there for organizing waypoints and so on. If you are not in the
    >US, good mapping software becomes a lot harder to find.
    >
    >Penny
    >
    You really explained the fun of playing with the GPS and maps well. I have found the map GPS and
    excellent trail research tool. I have nearly the same setup except I have your basic yellow eTrex.

    Bill "I think its that way" Porter www.mountainbikebill.com
     
  8. Bob

    Bob Guest

    "Bill Porter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 06:53:21 -0700, "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >> Anyone out there using GPS to trace new, or existing trails? If so what map software are you
    > >> using? What model of GPS are you using?
    > >>
    > >> TJ the wannabe Cartographer
    > >>
    > >> www.gvii.net/hundtoft
    > >
    > >the usual caveat is that GPS is no substitute for map and compass skills. That being said, we
    > >have an Etrex summit and software that was purchased originally for my husbands S &R work.
    > >
    > >Biking, we use it to upload a map after the ride, ( we ride in a lot of areas that are not well
    > >mapped) and make the elevation profile just for grins. I've been using the software for some trip
    > >planning for AMB-ID too...drawing routes freehand on the map, ( on trails) then looking at
    the
    > >profile to see just how rideable it might be.
    > >
    > >It's great fun to play with the maps. Sometimes we do a trail we've been riding for years, but
    > >since is isn't on ANY map it's just fun to see what
    it
    > >looks like.
    > >
    > >I have two sets of software: Nat Geo TOPO!! and Garmin Mapsource. The mapsource does road and
    > >topography, the ng stuff is based on USGS topo
    maps.
    > >The topo! map software provides the look and feel of the topo maps we all know and love.
    > >Mapsource, while doing highways and topography doesn't
    look
    > >the same at all when you get into the topography: it shows contours but
    not
    > >the details one gets used to. So I prefer TOPO, tho at $100/state it's
    not
    > >cheap. The only complaint I have about TOPO is that some of the maps the
    software
    > >is based on are dated.
    > >
    > >Here's a map we made riding "rollercoaster" . Note that the elev. profile
    is
    > >broken down in 25 foot increments so that every little whoopdedo shows
    up:
    > >www.specialtyoutdoors.com/images/rollercoaster.jpg
    > >
    > >Here's the map, an out and back with a little loop at the far end.
    > >www.specialtyoutdoors.com/images/rollercoastermap.jpg
    > >
    > >
    > >There's a lot of free software out there for organizing waypoints and so
    on.
    > >If you are not in the US, good mapping software becomes a lot harder to find.
    > >
    > >Penny

    I also use the Garmin Etrex summit with Washington and Oregon Topo mapping. It works fine for
    setting up routes or doing a route and exporting to the map. There is a nice program called
    ExpertGPS that can be downloaded on the net. This gives different views such as satellite photos on
    which to export data.

    The most useful part of the GPS is retracing if you get lost, but dense woods prevent reading
    signals from the satellites. -B
     
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