Component upgrade?



O

Oz

Guest
Howdy,

I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant OCR-3?
The current system is Shimano Sora 8-speed and I want to know how hard it
would be to upgrade to a Shimano 9-speed system. The higher priced Giant
OCR bikes have 9-speed systems but use the same frame as the OCR-3. I love
my bike but may want to upgrade the components in the future.

Thanks,

Rob
 
K

Ken

Guest
"Oz" <[email protected]nk.net> wrote in news:5Bh5d.3242$%06.810
@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net:
> I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant OCR-3?
> The current system is Shimano Sora 8-speed and I want to know how hard it
> would be to upgrade to a Shimano 9-speed system.


Upgrading is not hard, but it is not cheap and the performance gains are not
large. You can save a lot of money by just buying a better bike to begin
with.
 
D

dreaded

Guest
"Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "Oz" <[email protected]> wrote in news:5Bh5d.3242$%06.810
> @newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net:
> > I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant OCR-3?
> > The current system is Shimano Sora 8-speed and I want to know how hard

it
> > would be to upgrade to a Shimano 9-speed system.

>
> Upgrading is not hard, but it is not cheap and the performance gains are

not
> large. You can save a lot of money by just buying a better bike to begin
> with.
>


there is also the factor of the longevity of the parts. i know there is a
big difference between a 7 and a 9 cassette. the 9 is much thinner and wears
out much sooner. i dont know how and 8 sora would compare to a 9 dura-ace or
ultegra (anyone know?). OTOH the new STI systems are very nice.
-alan
 
O

Oz

Guest
"Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "Oz" <[email protected]> wrote in news:5Bh5d.3242$%06.810
> @newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net:
> > I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant OCR-3?
> > The current system is Shimano Sora 8-speed and I want to know how hard

it
> > would be to upgrade to a Shimano 9-speed system.

>
> Upgrading is not hard, but it is not cheap and the performance gains are

not
> large. You can save a lot of money by just buying a better bike to begin
> with.
>


Yeah . . . . . . If I could have afforded a $2,000 bike I would have bought
one. Kinda hard to justify a purchase like that with 4 kids to
raise/feed/clothe. Then again, for my first bike I did not want to drop
that kind of money.
 
B

Badger_South

Guest
On Sun, 26 Sep 2004 01:03:45 GMT, "Oz" <[email protected]> wrote:

>"Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> "Oz" <[email protected]> wrote in news:5Bh5d.3242$%06.810
>> @newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net:
>> > I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant OCR-3?
>> > The current system is Shimano Sora 8-speed and I want to know how hard

>it
>> > would be to upgrade to a Shimano 9-speed system.

>>
>> Upgrading is not hard, but it is not cheap and the performance gains are

>not
>> large. You can save a lot of money by just buying a better bike to begin
>> with.
>>

>
>Yeah . . . . . . If I could have afforded a $2,000 bike I would have bought
>one. Kinda hard to justify a purchase like that with 4 kids to
>raise/feed/clothe. Then again, for my first bike I did not want to drop
>that kind of money.


You're kinda missing the point. Now-a-days, it -is- better to buy the best
bike you can afford, all other things being equal, b/c "upgrading" isn't
really that beneficial/cost effective.

IMO, bikes are cheap for what you get - light weight, indexed shifting,
clipless pedals, carbon forks. Anything that you're going to use -a lot-
you should be willing to save up or budget around and get good equipment.
IMO, at around $1200 bucks there's a price break, go under $1000 and
there's some compromise, depending on the bike...ah, heck, make that under
$800 and there's compromise if you get a year-end sale. Some might say
build your own bike off ebay or shop for used bikes and know a diamond in
the rough and you can do much better than that.

However if your bike fits, and works fairly seamlessly with you, then
you've got all you need. One need not try make up for ill fit, or lack of
training with spending more money. You can get good to great performance at
the $1000-1200 range. It's just a matter of getting over the 'sticker
shock'. Remember you're paying >10K for your car, maybe even >20K, and it's
just a box to get you to distant destinations quickly. A bike is an
experience, a joy, even a way of life/life-saving device!

-B
 
D

Dan Daniel

Guest
On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 17:07:13 GMT, "Oz" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Howdy,
>
>I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant OCR-3?
>The current system is Shimano Sora 8-speed and I want to know how hard it
>would be to upgrade to a Shimano 9-speed system. The higher priced Giant
>OCR bikes have 9-speed systems but use the same frame as the OCR-3. I love
>my bike but may want to upgrade the components in the future.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Rob
>


It isn't hard to do. New shifters, cassette, and chain. Installation
is pretty straightforward. If you do the work yourself and find good
deals on the parts, $200-250 would get you into 9-speed 105, maybe
Ultegra easily.

Any reason that you want to upgrade? Or just looking ahead to when
parts start wearing out, etc.? Others here obviously have different
opinions than I do, but holding on to a frame you like and slowly
moving into better components is a valid way to go.
 
L

Luigi de Guzman

Guest
Badger_South wrote:

> On Sun, 26 Sep 2004 01:03:45 GMT, "Oz" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>"Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>> "Oz" <[email protected]> wrote in news:5Bh5d.3242$%06.810
>>> @newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net:
>>> > I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant
>>> > OCR-3? The current system is Shimano Sora 8-speed and I want to know
>>> > how hard

>>it
>>> > would be to upgrade to a Shimano 9-speed system.
>>>
>>> Upgrading is not hard, but it is not cheap and the performance gains are

>>not
>>> large. You can save a lot of money by just buying a better bike to
>>> begin with.
>>>

>>
>>Yeah . . . . . . If I could have afforded a $2,000 bike I would have
>>bought
>>one. Kinda hard to justify a purchase like that with 4 kids to
>>raise/feed/clothe. Then again, for my first bike I did not want to drop
>>that kind of money.

>
> You're kinda missing the point. Now-a-days, it -is- better to buy the best
> bike you can afford, all other things being equal, b/c "upgrading" isn't
> really that beneficial/cost effective.


In general, I'd agree--it's easier to shave the grams off the rider than the
bike (and often cheaper).

However:

There are situations where "upgrading," or at least component changes, might
result in a significantly different experience.

My bike is otherwise perfect, but I am saving money for new cranks with
170mm arms instead of the 175mm. Having ridden the longer crankarms for a
while now, I'm beginning to wonder if maybe I didn't just prefer shorter
crankarms to begin with (my first road bike--now in the process of being
resurrected!--had 172.5mm cranks). The anticipated gains are pretty big:
easier spinning and thus greater enjoyment through greater
speed/efficiency.

-Luigi


--
www.livejournal.com/users/ouij
Photos, Rants, Raves
 
O

Oz

Guest
"Dan Daniel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 17:07:13 GMT, "Oz" <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>
> >Howdy,
> >
> >I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant OCR-3?
> >The current system is Shimano Sora 8-speed and I want to know how hard it
> >would be to upgrade to a Shimano 9-speed system. The higher priced Giant
> >OCR bikes have 9-speed systems but use the same frame as the OCR-3. I

love
> >my bike but may want to upgrade the components in the future.
> >
> >Thanks,
> >
> >Rob
> >

>
> It isn't hard to do. New shifters, cassette, and chain. Installation
> is pretty straightforward. If you do the work yourself and find good
> deals on the parts, $200-250 would get you into 9-speed 105, maybe
> Ultegra easily.
>
> Any reason that you want to upgrade? Or just looking ahead to when
> parts start wearing out, etc.? Others here obviously have different
> opinions than I do, but holding on to a frame you like and slowly
> moving into better components is a valid way to go.
>


Dan,

That's it. I'm just thinking about the future. Thanks for the input
because you seem to be about the only one to have read my post with an open
mind and understood where I was coming from.

Thanks,

Rob
 
O

Oz

Guest
"Badger_South" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Sun, 26 Sep 2004 01:03:45 GMT, "Oz" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >"Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >news:[email protected]
> >> "Oz" <[email protected]> wrote in news:5Bh5d.3242$%06.810
> >> @newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net:
> >> > I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant

OCR-3?
> >> > The current system is Shimano Sora 8-speed and I want to know how

hard
> >it
> >> > would be to upgrade to a Shimano 9-speed system.
> >>
> >> Upgrading is not hard, but it is not cheap and the performance gains

are
> >not
> >> large. You can save a lot of money by just buying a better bike to

begin
> >> with.
> >>

> >
> >Yeah . . . . . . If I could have afforded a $2,000 bike I would have

bought
> >one. Kinda hard to justify a purchase like that with 4 kids to
> >raise/feed/clothe. Then again, for my first bike I did not want to drop
> >that kind of money.

>
> You're kinda missing the point. Now-a-days, it -is- better to buy the best
> bike you can afford, all other things being equal, b/c "upgrading" isn't
> really that beneficial/cost effective.
>
> IMO, bikes are cheap for what you get - light weight, indexed shifting,
> clipless pedals, carbon forks. Anything that you're going to use -a lot-
> you should be willing to save up or budget around and get good equipment.
> IMO, at around $1200 bucks there's a price break, go under $1000 and
> there's some compromise, depending on the bike...ah, heck, make that under
> $800 and there's compromise if you get a year-end sale. Some might say
> build your own bike off ebay or shop for used bikes and know a diamond in
> the rough and you can do much better than that.
>
> However if your bike fits, and works fairly seamlessly with you, then
> you've got all you need. One need not try make up for ill fit, or lack of
> training with spending more money. You can get good to great performance

at
> the $1000-1200 range. It's just a matter of getting over the 'sticker
> shock'. Remember you're paying >10K for your car, maybe even >20K, and

it's
> just a box to get you to distant destinations quickly. A bike is an
> experience, a joy, even a way of life/life-saving device!
>
> -B
>
>


Yeah, I suppose I could have waited until next year to get my bike. Then
again, I would have missed out on 2 or 3 months worth of riding.

The bike I have is fine for me for now. I was asking the question for
general information for the future.

I have noticed the tendency on this forum to take a simple question and blow
it way out of purportion - perhaps even devolving into arguments and
oportunities for people to get on their soapboxes and preach. I asked a
fairly simple question that Dan Daniel didn't seem to have a problem
answering. Perhaps, taking a simple question and using it as an opportunity
for pontificating is a little overkill. I don't know.

Back to lurker mode.

Rob
 
P

Peter Cole

Guest
"Dan Daniel" <[email protected]> wrote
>
> Any reason that you want to upgrade? Or just looking ahead to when
> parts start wearing out, etc.? Others here obviously have different
> opinions than I do, but holding on to a frame you like and slowly
> moving into better components is a valid way to go.


If you ride enough, it's really the default route unless you sell the bike.
Cassette and chain wear out pretty quickly, but brifters go too,
eventually. Let's not forget chainrings, BB's, headsets and rims, and the
recommendation of some to retire handlebars, seatposts, stems and cranks
after significant mileage. What does that leave? This phenomenon is
especially noticeable in mountain biking where things wear out faster and
suffer a lot more crash damage. Replacing/upgrading is just the way it is.
 
M

Michael Warner

Guest
On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 17:07:13 GMT, Oz wrote:

> I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant OCR-3?


Not hard, but expensive. I decided to buy a much better bike and relegate
the OCR3 to utility status, and I'm very happy I did.

--
bpo gallery at http://www4.tpgi.com.au/users/mvw1/bpo
 
L

Luigi de Guzman

Guest
Oz wrote:


> Yeah, I suppose I could have waited until next year to get my bike. Then
> again, I would have missed out on 2 or 3 months worth of riding.
>
> The bike I have is fine for me for now. I was asking the question for
> general information for the future.
>
> I have noticed the tendency on this forum to take a simple question and
> blow it way out of purportion - perhaps even devolving into arguments and
> oportunities for people to get on their soapboxes and preach. I asked a
> fairly simple question that Dan Daniel didn't seem to have a problem
> answering.


His answer also happened to be what you wanted to do anyway, right?

Just goes to show, we're not looking for answers--just corroboration.

> Perhaps, taking a simple question and using it as an
> opportunity
> for pontificating is a little overkill. I don't know.
>


This is usenet. *shrug*


Hauling this back on-topic: if I had a frame I really liked, and had
specific things that I wanted done better, sure, I'd upgrade a component
here or there. But I'd not upgrade to shave grams on the bike, since there
are too many kilograms on the rider.

-Luigi



--
www.livejournal.com/users/ouij
Photos, Rants, Raves
 
O

Oz

Guest
I can accept that. That is the route I will probably go, buying a much
better bike, when and if that is warranted. It's not that I didn't want a
much more expensive bike to begin with but I just couldn't justify that kind
of purchase when I am just starting out.

Thanks for the advice.

Rob




"Michael Warner" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 17:07:13 GMT, Oz wrote:
>
> > I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant OCR-3?

>
> Not hard, but expensive. I decided to buy a much better bike and relegate
> the OCR3 to utility status, and I'm very happy I did.
>
> --
> bpo gallery at http://www4.tpgi.com.au/users/mvw1/bpo
 
O

Oz

Guest
"Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Oz wrote:
>
>
> > Yeah, I suppose I could have waited until next year to get my bike.

Then
> > again, I would have missed out on 2 or 3 months worth of riding.
> >
> > The bike I have is fine for me for now. I was asking the question for
> > general information for the future.
> >
> > I have noticed the tendency on this forum to take a simple question and
> > blow it way out of purportion - perhaps even devolving into arguments

and
> > oportunities for people to get on their soapboxes and preach. I asked a
> > fairly simple question that Dan Daniel didn't seem to have a problem
> > answering.

>
> His answer also happened to be what you wanted to do anyway, right?


Sure. But what I was looking for was advice as to how difficult a component
upgrade may be. I don't know how much you know about Giant bikes but the
entire OCR line uses basically the same frame with the higher end bikes
having better componentry. I may never need to upgrade but I was curious to
know how difficult it would be.
>
> Just goes to show, we're not looking for answers--just corroboration.
>
> > Perhaps, taking a simple question and using it as an
> > opportunity
> > for pontificating is a little overkill. I don't know.
> >

>
> This is usenet. *shrug*
>
>
> Hauling this back on-topic: if I had a frame I really liked, and had
> specific things that I wanted done better, sure, I'd upgrade a component
> here or there. But I'd not upgrade to shave grams on the bike, since

there
> are too many kilograms on the rider.


Luigi, those were my thoughts exactly. I realize I will never by a *great*
rider. I don't have the time, for one thing, to put into it right now.
With 4 kids under the age of 18, I probably won't for some time. So, it was
more a question for the future than anything else.

Rob

>
> -Luigi
>
>
>
> --
> www.livejournal.com/users/ouij
> Photos, Rants, Raves
>
>
 
T

the black rose

Guest
Luigi de Guzman wrote:
> Hauling this back on-topic: if I had a frame I really liked, and had
> specific things that I wanted done better, sure, I'd upgrade a component
> here or there.


I met someone for whom this was the only viable option. She's a small
woman, at least a couple inches shorter than me and I'm only 5'2". It
can be a challenge to find a bike that fits, let me tell you. She
searched all over, with no luck, for a bike that fit her -- but her old
frame was still in good shape. So the LBS rebuilt it for her with new
components. Worked out great for her.

-km

--
Only cowards fight kids -- unidentified Moscow protester
the black rose
proud to be owned by a yorkie
http://community.webshots.com/user/blackrosequilts
 
B

Badger_South

Guest
On Sun, 26 Sep 2004 10:17:12 GMT, "Oz" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>I have noticed the tendency on this forum to take a simple question and blow
>it way out of purportion - perhaps even devolving into arguments and
>oportunities for people to get on their soapboxes and preach. I asked a
>fairly simple question that Dan Daniel didn't seem to have a problem
>answering. Perhaps, taking a simple question and using it as an opportunity
>for pontificating is a little overkill. I don't know.
>
>Back to lurker mode.
>
>Rob


Most of it, in my case, is just general enthusiasm and interest and
wanting to share what can be a tortuous path, for beginners, to a
simple solution.

In my case I put off buying a better bike for several months, when if
I had simply known about 'indexed shifters', I wouldn't have (I was
riding crappy grip-twist shifters, and a crappy bike.)

Woohoo - indexed shifters. <grin>

Sorry for the verbosity, mate.

Best,

-B
 
F

Fx199

Guest
>Subject: Re: Component upgrade?
>From: "Oz" [email protected]
>Date: 9/25/2004 8:03 PM US Eastern Standard Time
>Message-id: <[email protected]>
>
>"Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> "Oz" <[email protected]> wrote in news:5Bh5d.3242$%06.810
>> @newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net:
>> > I am curious, how hard is it to upgrade the components on a Giant OCR-3?
>> > The current system is Shimano Sora 8-speed and I want to know how hard

>it
>> > would be to upgrade to a Shimano 9-speed system.

>>
>> Upgrading is not hard, but it is not cheap and the performance gains are

>not
>> large. You can save a lot of money by just buying a better bike to begin
>> with.
>>

>
>Yeah . . . . . . If I could have afforded a $2,000 bike I would have bought
>one. Kinda hard to justify a purchase like that with 4 kids to
>raise/feed/clothe. Then again, for my first bike I did not want to drop
>that kind of money.


That's your problem and your situation, quit whining.