Composite Bead (i.e. folding tire) vs Wire Bead?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by x, Apr 13, 2003.

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  1. x

    x Guest

    Besides foldability and, I'd guess, weight, is there any advantage to wireless tires?
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
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  2. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Besides foldability and, I'd guess, weight, is there any advantage to
    wireless
    > tires?
    > -----------------------
    > PeteCresswell

    Nah. Not really. In fact, as much as I like kevlar beads, they're probably aren't really worth the
    $$$. The weight difference is really rather small and folding really isn't a big deal for me. For
    some reason, I do prefer them though! Go figure.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  3. On Sun, 13 Apr 2003 19:37:39 +0000, S. Anderson wrote:

    > "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Besides foldability and, I'd guess, weight, is there any advantage to
    > wireless

    > Nah. Not really. In fact, as much as I like kevlar beads, they're probably aren't really worth the
    > $$$. The weight difference is really rather small and folding really isn't a big deal for me. For
    > some reason, I do prefer them though! Go figure.

    I just got one, as a spare, from the T-town swap meet. A spare tire is a good thing to have on a
    ride, as I found out that very same day. A friend I was riding with got this huge bulge in her tire.
    My spare came to the rescue.

    I don't think there is any advantage beyond that, and for the extra money it's not worth it.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | "What am I on? I'm on my bike, six hours a day, busting my ass. _`\(,_ | What are you on?"
    --Lance Armstrong (_)/ (_) |
     
  4. Pete-<< Besides foldability and, I'd guess, weight, is there any advantage to wireless tires?

    Nope, I think like chains, casettes and helmets, people in general spend to much for tires. A mid
    range wire bead, in the $20-$25 range will work just fine for the majority of cyclists.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. Art Harris

    Art Harris Guest

    "David L. Johnson" wrote:>
    > I just got one, as a spare, from the T-town swap meet. A spare tire is a good thing to have on a
    > ride, as I found out that very same day. A friend I was riding with got this huge bulge in her
    > tire. My spare came to the rescue.
    >
    > I don't think there is any advantage beyond that, and for the extra money it's not worth it.

    Agree. And the kevlar bead tires tend to be harder to mount, especially when new. I sometimes carry
    an old kevlar bead tire as a spare.

    Art Harris
     
  6. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    Many of the quality tires only come in one version, with kevlar beads. So if you want a tire with
    good quality casing you might not have a choice.

    Size matters. oops... Weight matters, as we all know, since we spend a lot to have a light bike.
    Especially carring the bike up the stairs at the end of the ride. And folding tires save weight at
    better then the $/gm cost/benefit rule.

    -Bruce
     
  7. Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    > Pete-<< Besides foldability and, I'd guess, weight, is there any advantage to wireless tires?
    >
    > Nope, I think like chains, casettes and helmets, people in general spend to much for tires. A mid
    > range wire bead, in the $20-$25 range will work just fine for the majority of cyclists.
    >
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"

    There's definitely something to be said for a well ventilated helmet. Yes, obviously it's not going
    to protect your head better (possibly not even as well if there are pointy things that might stab
    ya!), but there was a big difference moving from a $30 helmet to a $130 helmet (bought for $70 on
    closeout), and there was a difference between that $130 helmet and the $60 helmet bought to replace
    it after it was stolen. And then the next $100 helmet, after I cracked the $60 one, was just as
    expected. Its not going to make much difference when its 60 degrees F outside, but when I'm riding
    in humid New England summer conditions, with the mercury reading above 90F, it sure does make a HUGE
    difference. You know that old addage about putting on a hat if your toes are cold? It definitely
    works - trust me, I'm a ski instructor. You lose a lot of heat through your head, so insulation up
    there, whether a helmet or a winter hat, makes a big difference in overall body temperature.

    Cassettes, unless you're going for an ultralight bike, don't really do too much. Maybe they shift a
    teensy bit faster, but is that worth another $70? Not IME.

    However, there is something to be said about light tires. Lighter tires can really make a big FEEL
    lighter - plus, you've got that whole placebo effect going. And for those of us who can't lose that
    pound or four off our bodies (I'm a beanpole, personally, with very very little body fat. Not that
    I'm fit, 'cause I'm not, but its the way my body is), a few pounds off the bike can make a big
    difference. Yeah, you're not gonna get that just in tires, but add up a lot of little weight savings
    and you've got a sizable difference.

    My hardtail started out at about 30 pounds, give or take. Now its down around 24. Besides having
    better parts that shift better and are more reliable, it accelerates faster and is a lot easier to
    "flick" around.

    There are some spots where saving weight is stupid. Tires is one - wait, didn't I just say that
    light tires are good? Well, yeah, but thats assuming the performance is up to par. I'd rather have a
    650g knobbie that I know will stick to every corner and not slip out on steep climbs than some 450g
    race tire that sheds knobs, has awful traction, wears super fast, and punctures easily. Forks, too -
    yeah, you can get a 3lb suspension fork, or even lighter, but its gonna flex like a sideshow
    contorsionist. Take a bit of a weight hit, and get a fork thats plusher, stiffer, and more reliable.

    Sorry for the overblown reply, trying to avoid doing homework!

    Jon Bond Tufts Cycling
     
  8. Jonathan Bond wrote:
    >
    > Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    > >
    > > Nope, I think like chains, casettes and helmets, people in general spend to much for tires. A
    > > mid range wire bead, in the $20-$25 range will work just fine for the majority of cyclists.
    >
    > There's definitely something to be said for a well ventilated helmet.... Lighter tires can really
    > make a big FEEL lighter - plus, you've got that whole placebo effect going...

    Helmets - tires - placebo effect... I tell you, there's money to be made here!

    Right now, people buy black spokes, green tires, carbon-fiber seat stays, and THIS year's foam hat,
    and golly they get faster _and_ more comfortable with each item!

    But that's an expensive way to get your placebo. I'm working on some spray-on placebo for bike gear.
    Just spray your old 22-hole helmet, and it'll feel just as cool (and protect just as well) as a
    multi-hundred-dollar 28-hole one! Spray it on tires to improve road feel! Spray it on your frame for
    that unmatched, "firm yet supple" placebo ride!

    Anybody want in on the IPO? ;-)

    --
    Frank Krygowski [email protected]
     
  9. [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Pete-<< Besides foldability and, I'd guess, weight, is there any advantage to wireless tires?
    >
    > Nope, I think like chains, casettes and helmets, people in general spend to much for tires. A mid
    > range wire bead, in the $20-$25 range will work just fine for the majority of cyclists.
    >

    As another poster has already said, some brands of folding-bead tyres can be absolute pigs to fit
    when new (never had this problem with Vredestein Fortezza Tri-Comps, but some Michelins, on the
    other hand, tend to be very stubborn). There's a slight weight advantage to be had, mind, and the
    foldability is nice if buying mail order(!!), but steel-bead tyres have their merits too. The
    wire-beaded Hutchinson Pro Gold (which has now finally gone over to folding format, I will admit) is
    a very popular, and good quality, cyclo-cross tyre, for instance.

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York
     
  10. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Pete-<< Besides foldability and, I'd guess, weight, is there any advantage
    to
    > wireless tires?
    >
    > Nope, I think like chains, casettes and helmets, people in general spend
    to
    > much for tires. A mid range wire bead, in the $20-$25 range will work just
    fine
    > for the majority of cyclists.

    The "evil empire" of bikes: Performance is having a sale on some Michelin Prestige tires that
    wear like iron, ride OK, and don't weigh a ton. They happen to be folding, but I buy them for
    the qualities listed above and their low price. I've always wondered about people training on
    "race" tires...

    I think $50-60/per tire that wears out in 500-750mi is a little excessive (eg: GP Supersonics) for
    training, but hey, if someone wants it, who am I to stand in their way? I'll keep running my
    Prestige tires for 3-4 of their lightweight tires and still outride them!

    Mike
     
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