Conconi test and monitoring individual aerobic ability

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Skvira, Jan 27, 2014.

  1. Skvira

    Skvira New Member

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    Ergospirometry and gas analysis is very expensive methods of monitoring your fitness conditions. 100$ isn't problem if you talking about yourself. But when we have in mind the whole cycling team it's about more than 1000$ only for testing procedure. Don't forget, that the special laboratories is situated in certain places. That's why testing will cost's you a lot more money, because you must bring all team to the laboratory.
    Another story with Conconi test. It's more cheaper than laboratory methods, and you can do it everywhere by yourself.
    There are some easy rules, that helps use this test for monitoring individual conditions during training:
    1st - test must be held with the same protocol from time to time.
    2nd - tested athlete must be in full recovery condition.
    3rd - same environment during testing and same beginning time is useful, but not necessary.

    4th - also you must have your training data from diary for analysing test results.
    If you follow this rules you can have the same graphics as showed on pictures after few months:
    [​IMG]
    If you compare this curves with following diagram you can judge the effectiveness of previous training.
    [​IMG]
    During the first test subject demonstrate expressed reactivity and some level of working ability (15 steps). After that he's performance was dedicated for improving aerobic capacity. In the second testing subject's working ability increased by 3 steps along with the lower reactivity. Afterwards this athlete works on his working efficiency. Third test shows us results of his work. Decreased reactivity in lover part of curve shows better work efficiency.
    So, as more you use this method as better you evaluate testing results. Practise, practise and practise. And, of course, waiting for my next entries.
    More articles: http://cyclingscience.ucoz.com/publ
     
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