Concorde Road Bikes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Sasha Nackovski, Jun 7, 2003.

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  1. Hi,

    Any opinions out there on older Italian Concorde road bikes? I am looking at purchasing one with
    Columbus tubing, Shimano 600 groupset and Mavic wheels. Apparently in reasonably good condition, I
    havn't viewed the bike yet. Owner wants the equivelant to around $150USD (I am in Australia). Is it
    worth this much? Do these bikes have any collector or retro value? I am looking for a bike to use as
    a daily rider to work so I can save my MTB for what it was designed to do....

    Any opinions appreciated.

    Sasha
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>, Sasha Nackovski <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >Hi,
    >
    >Any opinions out there on older Italian Concorde road bikes? I am looking at purchasing one with
    >Columbus tubing, Shimano 600 groupset and Mavic wheels. Apparently in reasonably good condition, I
    >havn't viewed the bike yet. Owner wants the equivelant to around $150USD (I am in Australia). Is it
    >worth this much? Do these bikes have any collector or retro value? I am looking for a bike to use
    >as a daily rider to work so I can save my MTB for what it was designed to do....

    These are OK bikes, a pretty garden-variety Italian thing but not an especially desirable name. Some
    are all lugged and some have a few fillet brazed joints, kind of like you see on some Basso frames.
    The nicer ones have chromed stays. The cheapest models did not use Columbus tubing. The value of the
    bike (and whether it's worth US$150) depends on its condition, what year the parts are from, which
    Columbus tubing it is made from, etc. Does it have a 6/7/8/9 speed cluster? Freewheel or cassette?
    STI shifters? At this time a 1980's Concorde with Shimano parts will have no real collector value
    but certainly receives numerous retro points and would probably be a nice bike. If it's an old
    6-speed Shimano 600EX bike then $150 is probably a little more than I'd pay for it, unless the frame
    was very nice. But if it's a 1990's Genius tubing frame it would be more than worth it, there is a
    wide range of quality.

    --Paul
     
  3. Ideal

    Ideal Guest

    Concorde made by Ciocc? in Italy then shipped to the Benelux for painting & distribution. Imported
    en-masse in the late eighties to early nineties. The importer had quite a good relationship with
    Holland & there are a few ex-PDM team bikes especially around Western Australia. Concorde bikes
    complete out of Taiwan through Veltec were also imported at cheaper price points. Not a praticularly
    collectable bike unless it is a Record C equipped PDM team bike belonging to Rooks or Theunisse.

    Mike S. wrote:
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>Any opinions out there on older Italian Concorde road bikes? I am looking at purchasing one with
    >>Columbus tubing, Shimano 600 groupset and Mavic wheels. Apparently in reasonably good condition, I
    >>havn't viewed the bike yet. Owner wants the equivelant to around $150USD (I am in Australia). Is
    >>it worth this much? Do these bikes have any collector or retro value? I am looking for a bike to
    >>use as a daily rider to work so I can save my MTB for what it was designed to do....
    >>
    >>Any opinions appreciated.
    >>
    >>Sasha
    >
    >
    > I liked my Concorde when I owned it. SLX tubing, lugs, etc. Rode nice, looked good. Mine was the
    > "PDM" color scheme, so maybe it had more "collector value" but probably not much...
    >
    > If it fits, buy it.
    >
    > Mike
     
  4. I have a Concorde frame, the model name is the Aquila. It is from the mid 90's and is full Columbus
    TSX with a full chrome fork and full chrome rear stays both seat and chain. I've ridden it hard
    since I got it. I first built is up with Chorus 8sp in 1995 and upgraded the drive chain to 10sp in
    2001. It still feels as good now as when I got it in 1995. The Concorde frames from that time period
    were indeed made in the Ciocc factory. I've seen them on the web as a link from Sean Kelly's web
    site. Can't really say any thing about the newer ones. "Sasha Nackovski" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > Any opinions out there on older Italian Concorde road bikes? I am looking at purchasing one with
    > Columbus tubing, Shimano 600 groupset and Mavic wheels. Apparently in reasonably good condition, I
    > havn't viewed the bike yet. Owner wants the equivelant to around $150USD (I am in Australia). Is
    > it worth this much? Do these bikes have any collector or retro value? I am looking for a bike to
    > use as a daily rider to work so I can save my MTB for what it was designed to do....
    >
    > Any opinions appreciated.
    >
    > Sasha
     
  5. Many thanks to all who responded.

    I took Mike's advice- the bike fit, so I bought it. And I couldn't resist the metal Italian flag
    brazed onto the frame.

    Anyway, this bike is made from Columbus SL tubing, and has a chrome fork and seat stays. Shimano 600
    Gruppo, with 7 speed cluster, Cinelli Giro bars, and Mavic open 4 wheels in very good condition. All
    works well, but the frame could do with a new paint job, which is not a problem for me given my
    spray painting background.

    Bargained the guy down to the equivelant of US $135, I thought it wasn't to bad of a deal. Someone
    please tell me if I did wrong so I can avoid such purchases in the future...:)

    Sasha

    On Sat, 07 Jun 2003 10:06:02 GMT, [email protected] (Sasha Nackovski) wrote:

    >
    >Hi,
    >
    >Any opinions out there on older Italian Concorde road bikes? I am looking at purchasing one with
    >Columbus tubing, Shimano 600 groupset and Mavic wheels. Apparently in reasonably good condition, I
    >havn't viewed the bike yet. Owner wants the equivelant to around $150USD (I am in Australia). Is it
    >worth this much? Do these bikes have any collector or retro value? I am looking for a bike to use
    >as a daily rider to work so I can save my MTB for what it was designed to do....
    >
    >Any opinions appreciated.
    >
    >Sasha
     
  6. Andresmuro

    Andresmuro Guest

    $135 for a racing bike that fits, you did great.

    Those bikes where the top racing bikes that the European pros used to race and win races with 10-15
    years ago. They used to cost anywhere form $1,000 to $2,000 depending on components. Aside from the
    STI and more gears, there is essentially no difference to a 2003 bike. Gimicks aside, the essential
    nature of the bike hasn't changed that much. So Lance Armstrong would still win the Tour in a
    properly fitted Concord.

    Let the flames begin!!

    Andres
     
  7. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "AndresMuro" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > $135 for a racing bike that fits, you did great.
    >
    > Those bikes where the top racing bikes that the European pros used to race
    and
    > win races with 10-15 years ago. They used to cost anywhere form $1,000 to $2,000 depending on
    > components. Aside from the STI and more gears, there
    is
    > essentially no difference to a 2003 bike. Gimicks aside, the essential
    nature
    > of the bike hasn't changed that much. So Lance Armstrong would still win
    the
    > Tour in a properly fitted Concord.
    >
    > Let the flames begin!!
    >
    > Andres

    My favorite riding bike of all time was a TIG welded SL tubed Battaglin I picked up from Performance
    when they were closing them out at a ridiculous price. 8 years later, I'm still kicking myself for
    selling that bike!

    Wasn't the best thing to sprint on, but oh boy was it a smoooooth riding bike.

    Mike
     
  8. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "IDEAL" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Concorde made by Ciocc? in Italy then shipped to the Benelux for painting & distribution. Imported
    > en-masse in the late eighties to early nineties. The importer had quite a good relationship with
    > Holland & there are a few ex-PDM team bikes especially around Western Australia. Concorde bikes
    > complete out of Taiwan through Veltec were also imported at cheaper price points. Not a
    > praticularly collectable bike unless it is a Record C equipped PDM team bike belonging to Rooks or
    > Theunisse.
    >
    > Mike S. wrote:

    I was always planning on building it up with C Record, etc, just like the pro bikes. Got the frame
    while in college, saw the prices on Record, and said "screw it." It ended up life with 600 STI...

    The bike's actually still here in SD. I saw it at Fiesta Island one evening beat to hell by its
    current owner. Oh well...

    Mike
     
  9. andres-<< Aside from the STI and more gears, there is essentially no difference to a 2003 bike.
    Gimicks aside, the essential nature of the bike hasn't changed that much. So Lance Armstrong would
    still win the Tour in a properly fitted Concord.

    Let the flames begin!!

    But you are right!

    'it isn't about the bike' and once a team mate of Eddy said, 'Eddy could win on my bike, I can't win
    on his'....

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
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