CONCRASTINATION: how to control procrastination and improve your

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    CONCRASTINATION How to control procrastination and improve your swimming

    By Marc St-Aubin www3.sympatico.ca/3synergies <http://www3.sympatico.ca/3synergies>

    Think of this scenario: an exam, an assignment, or a project.

    How many times have you been leaving things to the last minute?

    Or being late for meetings and appointments?

    Does that happen to you often?

    Well you're not alone...

    One in four of you reading this has a serious problem with procrastination.

    But there could be a price you pay on your competitive swimming career: that is, swimmers
    AND coaches.

    The biggest price is having that damn project cluttering your mind, robbing you of enjoying other
    things, or fully focusing on training, and even competition. But there are more serious consequences
    too. Not getting the grades you want, and feeling resentment and frustration, these are the huge
    consequences of procrastination.

    Procrastination comes from the latin "crastinus" which means of tomorrow. A procrastinator is a
    champion, a master of putting things off until tomorrow -- anytime but now!

    It's is a habit really. It's a learned behaviour to cope with something else. When we do it, we
    engage in diversions. We're good at that. Distractions like TV, going to movies, talking to friends
    on the phone. We put off things that we consider unpleasant, difficult, threatening or
    uncomfortable. We put things off to defend ourselves from fear of failure, inadequacy or because of
    perfectionism.

    "Motivation plays a role in increasing pain tolerance because athletes who are highly motivated will
    endure more pain without giving up," says Ernest Maglischo in Swimming Faster. Procrastination is a
    challenge in motivation. The more you can overcome the challenge, the better your motivation.

    Some procrastination has been linked to difficulty concentrating. That's why using a Zen philosophy
    is a step in the right direction. Anything that helps you live in the now like meditation and yoga
    will be helpful.

    There are other things that contribute to procrastination.

    Like when you don't think you can do it. Even saying you're bad at concrastination -- more on that
    later. That's called self-downing. If you're having doubts maybe the project isn't for you. Maybe
    you need to delegate it, pass on to someone else. But if you have no choice and you're the one, get
    off the fence and do something.

    Another reason for procrastination is low-frustration tolerance. It's like a pain threshold. Maybe
    yours is low. Every time something gets in your way or there's a challenge you stop the project and
    engage in those distractions again. Maybe you hate discomforts. I know it's tough to have an
    obstacle stopping your flow, but any challenge CAN BE OVERCOME. So, if your "pain-threshold" is low
    for school and other stuff, it will affect the threshold and endurance you really need in swimming.

    Research has shown that hostility, resentment, and anger are factors that increase your chances of
    procrastination. If that's the case, you need to deal with or get help.

    So how we put procrastination on a leash?

    You CON-CRASTINATE

    It's a new word which you have heard here for the very first time -- it's a deliberate effort to
    break the habit of procrastination.

    How do you concrastinate? Be aware of your limitations and challenges, then organize yourself. The
    key is structure and tools to help you The obvious is to plan, to break up a big project into
    smaller parts, and to schedule time during the week to do these things. "The dread of doing a task
    uses up more time and energy than doing the task itself," says Rita Emmett the author of the
    procrastinator handbook. Emmett says what you actually dread is getting started! The motivation and
    momentum needed So why not use the motivation, the vision of the task completed -- the pay-off! --
    to give you that momentum.

    Really time estimate how long something is going to take. Use a kitchen timer - go at it for one
    hour - uninterrupted! Make the boring fun, therefore more challenging. Listen to music or the radio.
    Do it with other people! Identify what you really hate about the job.

    Some of us have difficulty with planning, or the execution, the follow through.

    Here are simple and effective strategies to help you. Like the FIVE-MINUTE PLAN. Just commit to
    working on something for only five-minutes! Then, decide if you want to pursue for 5 minutes. At the
    end, again decide if want to continue. The idea is only to commit to a short amount of time... and
    to use momentum to your advantage. Then there's the SET-GO. This is when you just gather stuff to
    get organized...you know, the preliminary stuff. But you put off doing the "real" work. That's
    because the preliminaries give you a sense of accomplishment. You're good at "set" but the pits at
    "go". Visualize yourself setting and beginning without hesitation until it's done. Be a paradox.
    Tell yourself that following through is impossible. Then prove yourself wrong! Get into a silly
    habit that signifies you are about to begin!

    But beware!

    If you are constantly looking for the perfect conditions or the right inspiration to begin a project
    or continue it, you're in trouble.

    " Why not just seize the pleasure! How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish
    preparation." Jane Austen

    Do yourself a favour: anything worth doing doesn't have to be perfect at first!

    We all procrastinate. But some of us do it a degree that seriously impedes our personal lives,
    future and relationships. And of course this leads to unwanted mountains of stress!

    So put an end to this nasty habit. Control procrastination. CON-CRASTINATE!

    Oh yeah, give yourself a reward only after you've completed the task... like seeing a movie, or
    getting a massage. And feel good about yourself, your swimming will get better too.

    --------------090104030903020802000608 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-
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    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-
    Type" content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1"> <title></title> </head> <body text="#000000"
    bgcolor="#ffffff"> <div align="center"><big><big><b>CONCRASTINATION</b></big></big><br> How to
    control procrastination and improve your swimming<br> <br> By Marc St-Aubin<br> <a
    href="http://www3.sympatico.ca/3synergies">www3.sympatico.ca/3synergies </a><br> </div> <pre> Think
    of this scenario: an exam, an assignment, or a project.

    How many times have you been leaving things to the last minute?

    Or being late for meetings and appointments?

    Does that happen to you often?

    Well you're not alone...

    One in four of you reading this has a serious problem with procrastination.

    But there could be a price you pay on your competitive swimming career: that is, swimmers
    AND coaches.

    The biggest price is having that damn project cluttering your mind, robbing you of enjoying other
    things, or fully focusing on training, and even competition. But there are more serious consequences
    too. Not getting the grades you want, and feeling resentment and frustration, these are the huge
    consequences of procrastination.

    Procrastination comes from the latin "crastinus" which means of tomorrow. A procrastinator is a
    champion, a master of putting things off until tomorrow -- anytime but now!

    It's is a habit really. It's a learned behaviour to cope with something else. When we do it, we
    engage in diversions. We're good at that. Distractions like TV, going to movies, talking to friends
    on the phone. We put off things that we consider unpleasant, difficult, threatening or
    uncomfortable. We put things off to defend ourselves from fear of failure, inadequacy or because of
    perfectionism.

    "Motivation plays a role in increasing pain tolerance because athletes who are highly motivated will
    endure more pain without giving up," says Ernest Maglischo in Swimming Faster. Procrastination is a
    challenge in motivation. The more you can overcome the challenge, the better your motivation.

    Some procrastination has been linked to difficulty concentrating. That's why using a Zen philosophy
    is a step in the right direction. Anything that helps you live in the now like meditation and yoga
    will be helpful.

    There are other things that contribute to procrastination.

    Like when you don't think you can do it. Even saying you're bad at <b style="color: black; background-
    color: rgb(255, 255, 102);">concrastination</b> -- more on that later. That's called self-downing.
    If you're having doubts maybe the project isn't for you. Maybe you need to delegate it, pass on to
    someone else. But if you have no choice and you're the one, get off the fence and do something.

    Another reason for procrastination is low-frustration tolerance. It's like a pain threshold. Maybe
    yours is low. Every time something gets in your way or there's a challenge you stop the project and
    engage in those distractions again. Maybe you hate discomforts. I know it's tough to have an
    obstacle stopping your flow, but any challenge CAN BE OVERCOME. So, if your "pain-threshold" is low
    for school and other stuff, it will affect the threshold and endurance you really need in swimming.

    Research has shown that hostility, resentment, and anger are factors that increase your chances of
    procrastination. If that's the case, you need to deal with or get help.

    So how we put procrastination on a leash?

    You CON-CRASTINATE

    It's a new word which you have heard here for the very first time -- it's a deliberate effort to
    break the habit of procrastination.

    How do you concrastinate? Be aware of your limitations and challenges, then organize yourself. The
    key is structure and tools to help you The obvious is to plan, to break up a big project into
    smaller parts, and to schedule time during the week to do these things. "The dread of doing a task
    uses up more time and energy than doing the task itself," says Rita Emmett the author of the
    procrastinator handbook. Emmett says what you actually dread is getting started! The motivation and
    momentum needed So why not use the motivation, the vision of the task completed -- the pay-off! --
    to give you that momentum.

    Really time estimate how long something is going to take. Use a kitchen timer - go at it for one
    hour - uninterrupted! Make the boring fun, therefore more challenging. Listen to music or the radio.
    Do it with other people! Identify what you really hate about the job.

    Some of us have difficulty with planning, or the execution, the follow through.

    Here are simple and effective strategies to help you. Like the FIVE-MINUTE PLAN. Just commit to
    working on something for only five-minutes! Then, decide if you want to pursue for 5 minutes. At the
    end, again decide if want to continue. The idea is only to commit to a short amount of time... and
    to use momentum to your advantage. Then there's the SET-GO. This is when you just gather stuff to
    get organized...you know, the preliminary stuff. But you put off doing the "real" work. That's
    because the preliminaries give you a sense of accomplishment. You're good at "set" but the pits at
    "go". Visualize yourself setting and beginning without hesitation until it's done. Be a paradox.
    Tell yourself that following through is impossible. Then prove yourself wrong! Get into a silly
    habit that signifies you are about to begin!

    But beware!

    If you are constantly looking for the perfect conditions or the right inspiration to begin a project
    or continue it, you're in trouble.

    " Why not just seize the pleasure! How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish
    preparation." Jane Austen

    Do yourself a favour: anything worth doing doesn't have to be perfect at first!

    We all procrastinate. But some of us do it a degree that seriously impedes our personal lives,
    future and relationships. And of course this leads to unwanted mountains of stress!

    So put an end to this nasty habit. Control procrastination. CON-CRASTINATE!

    Oh yeah, give yourself a reward only after you've completed the task... like seeing a movie, or
    getting a massage. And feel good about yourself, your swimming will get better too.

    </pre> <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72"> </pre> </body> </html>

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