cone wrench vs pedal wrench



hwttdz

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Sep 28, 2003
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Ok, so I've got to repack my hubs and I need 2 15mm cone wrenches to pull the hub axle out. Can I use my pedal wrench for one or do I need to get two 15mm cone wrenches?

Is it normal to have to repack bearings after 1500 miles?
 

dhk

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Sep 1, 2003
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hwttdz said:
Ok, so I've got to repack my hubs and I need 2 15mm cone wrenches to pull the hub axle out. Can I use my pedal wrench for one or do I need to get two 15mm cone wrenches?

Is it normal to have to repack bearings after 1500 miles?
Sure, just put the thin cone wrench on the inside, use the fat wrench on the locknut.

1500 miles does seem early to have bearing problems.....you sure the hubs need to be repacked? IE, do they feel rough when you hold the axle and spin them?
 

boudreaux

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Oct 16, 2003
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hwttdz said:
Ok, so I've got to repack my hubs and I need 2 15mm cone wrenches to pull the hub axle out. Can I use my pedal wrench for one or do I need to get two 15mm cone wrenches?

Is it normal to have to repack bearings after 1500 miles?
Free hot tip of the day: you can even use a metric cresent wrench on the locknut.
 

e_guevara

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Jul 15, 2004
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hwttdz said:
Ok, so I've got to repack my hubs and I need 2 15mm cone wrenches to pull the hub axle out. Can I use my pedal wrench for one or do I need to get two 15mm cone wrenches?

Is it normal to have to repack bearings after 1500 miles?
Like the name says, a 'cone wrench' is used for the 'hub cone', any wrench that fits will do for the locknut.

To adjust play in the hubs, you would need two cone wrenches on both cones.
 

hwttdz

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Sep 28, 2003
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Metric crescent wrench, ha, that's funny, haven't heard that before. On a more serious note it looks like it would be too narrow for a crescent wrench, not that I have any here. The pedal wrench on the other hand is quite narrow and I guess it'll work just fine.

Yeah, they feel pretty rough, which I'm disappointed about. What is the main cause of having to repack the bearings? am I getting water in there? dirt? Would a higher quality wheelset require less maintenance?

What greases can people recommend as good ones for this use. Right now I'm thinking Tri-Flow Synthetic Grease.
 

e_guevara

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Jul 15, 2004
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hwttdz said:
Metric crescent wrench, ha, that's funny, haven't heard that before. On a more serious note it looks like it would be too narrow for a crescent wrench, not that I have any here. The pedal wrench on the other hand is quite narrow and I guess it'll work just fine.

Yeah, they feel pretty rough, which I'm disappointed about. What is the main cause of having to repack the bearings? am I getting water in there? dirt? Would a higher quality wheelset require less maintenance?

What greases can people recommend as good ones for this use. Right now I'm thinking Tri-Flow Synthetic Grease.
There are a number of causes to that, grease drying out, water getting in, dirt, etc. If it feels rough, check for pitting on the cones and wear on the bearings. It would still feel rough even if you repack the bearings when there is pitting/wear. Replace the bearings/cones if necessary.

Higher quality wheelsets have better seals and some use cartridge bearings, but they don't eliminate the need for routine maintenance.

I just use a light automotive grease when repacking bearings.

HTH
 

hwttdz

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Sep 28, 2003
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boudreaux said:
NOOOOOOOOOOooooooooo!!

I'm sorry but that didn't clarify the issue for me any. I wasn't after how to adjust the play in the hubs, but if you'd like to share, I'd be more than willing to listen.
 

boudreaux

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Oct 16, 2003
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hwttdz said:
I'm sorry but that didn't clarify the issue for me any. I wasn't after how to adjust the play in the hubs, but if you'd like to share, I'd be more than willing to listen.
Well, the way a clever person does it is just loosen and remove the locknut and cone from one side of the axel(left side in the rear) pull out the axel with the cone and locknut still affixed.Service and repack bearings. Insert axel. Tighten cone to adjust bearing using anything that works to hold locknut/cone on opposite side. Usually fingers work, since you aren't really cranking down on the adjusting cone. Once adjusted,use cone wrench to hold cone and metric cresent wrnch to tighten the locknut....You could use a cone wrench on the opposite side,but you don't really have to.
 

e_guevara

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Jul 15, 2004
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boudreaux said:
Well, the way a clever person does it is just loosen and remove the locknut and cone from one side of the axel(left side in the rear) pull out the axel with the cone and locknut still affixed.Service and repack bearings. Insert axel. Tighten cone to adjust bearing using anything that works to hold locknut/cone on opposite side. Usually fingers work, since you aren't really cranking down on the adjusting cone. Once adjusted,use cone wrench to hold cone and metric cresent wrnch to tighten the locknut....You could use a cone wrench on the opposite side,but you don't really have to.
Personally, I do it two wrenches - I find that tightening by hand is usually not that "tight" to my liking. Hey, it works for me...
 

jasong

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Nov 24, 2003
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I think a better approach, and as recommended in Barnetts guide, is to use a hub axle vise (or a spare drop out) and adjust the other locknut/cone under simulated pressure of the quick release. Otherwise you'll havetoo much pressure once the QR is closed well. Barnetts recommends being able to feel play in the bearings when the QR is at a 45 degree angle and no play fully closed under recommended closing force.

boudreaux said:
cranking down on the adjusting cone. Once adjusted,use cone wrench to hold cone and metric cresent wrnch to tighten the locknut....You could use a cone wrench on the opposite side,but you don't really have to.
 

Weisse Luft

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May 28, 2004
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jasong said:
I think a better approach, and as recommended in Barnetts guide, is to use a hub axle vise (or a spare drop out) and adjust the other locknut/cone under simulated pressure of the quick release. Otherwise you'll havetoo much pressure once the QR is closed well. Barnetts recommends being able to feel play in the bearings when the QR is at a 45 degree angle and no play fully closed under recommended closing force.

That is the ideal method. Unfortunately, most hubs do not allow adjustment of the bearings while the wheel is mounted, simulated or otherwise. My American Classic rear hub is one such model that allows adjustment while mounted. Some Campy hubs and Chris King also allow it. The general rule is if the locknut is bearing against the dropout, you need to adjust off the bike and leave the bearings somewhat loose.

The axle vise is not only recommended, it makes the adjustment far easier. If you have a bench vise, its a very low cost addition.
 

jasong

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Nov 24, 2003
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I'm not sure I'm familiar with those that aren't. Would you consider normal Shimano (ie. 105/ultegra) to be of this variety? Or which don't fall into that category? And you're proposing keeping a 5mm nut or the QR bolt pressing against the threaded axle on the opposite side? Yeah, it doesn't exactly simulate the compression of the dropout against the lock nut, but it seems to come close since opening the QR slightly introduces play and with it compressed, there is no play. Much like in the vise.

Weisse Luft said:
That is the ideal method. Unfortunately, most hubs do not allow adjustment of the bearings while the wheel is mounted, simulated or
 

boudreaux

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Oct 16, 2003
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jasong said:
I think a better approach, and as recommended in Barnetts guide, is to use a hub axle vise (or a spare drop out) and adjust the other locknut/cone under simulated pressure of the quick release. Otherwise you'll havetoo much pressure once the QR is closed well. Barnetts recommends being able to feel play in the bearings when the QR is at a 45 degree angle and no play fully closed under recommended closing force.
Makes ya wonder how people do this successfully for years with just a cone wrench or two.. :rolleyes:
 

jasong

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Nov 24, 2003
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How are you defining successfully? I'd say those that do this a few times a day definitely have a feel for it and may not need more precision, much like those that have tuned their senses with a torque wrench and don't need it either. The vise method will definitely save time. Barnetts even goes further than one would seem practical or necessary with their sticker add on. You've read his chapter on this?

boudreaux said:
Makes ya wunder how people do this sucessfully for years with just a cone wrench or two.. :rolleyes:
 

boudreaux

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Oct 16, 2003
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jasong said:
How are you defining successfully? I'd say those that do this a few times a day definitely have a feel for it and may not need more precision, much like those that have tuned their senses with a torque wrench and don't need it either. The vise method will definitely save time. Barnetts even goes further than one would seem practical or necessary with their sticker add on. You've read his chapter on this?
Amazingly enough, I've only read enough of Barnetts to know you don't need it to build and maintain bikes if you know what you are doing.I know people that quote it endlessly and can't find their azz with both hands.