Contador :CAS hearing

Discussion in 'Professional Cycling' started by limerickman, Nov 21, 2011.

  1. CAAD

    CAAD New Member

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    As always the lying cheat will get away from it. He was about to have a ban and then some important spanish man said sorry but i don't think he should be banned and then he got away with it again. he is a blatant cheat and lier. He didn't win this years tour probably because he was trying to make people think he didn't cheat and maybe he wasn't so drugged up to his eyeballs for the 2011 tour. I think he is a disgrace and is putting a bad name for cycling just lucky a decent clean rider won the tour this year. There should be more Cadel Evans in this world. Ok rant over now
     


  2. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I'm like so totally convinced by your arguments.
     
  3. steve

    steve Administrator
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    It's d-day for Alberto Contador.

    Quote: Contador verdict expected today The Cour of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) is expected to announce its decision on the doping case involving Alberto Contador (Saxo Bank) at some point today. Recent questions surrounding the composition of the arbitration panel caused a delay in the decision process, which has now been pending for almost one year. In March 2011, the UCI and WADA appealed the Spanish cycling federation's decision to clear Contador of doping charges caused by his positive test for clenbuterol at the 2010 Tour de France.

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/contador-verdict-expected-today
     
  4. slovakguy

    slovakguy Active Member

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    and because there haven't been enough farcical turns to this drama, the cas postpones the announcement again.

    how can you not respect the organisations which govern cycling? i mean, we are supposed to respect these organisations, right?
     
  5. lance_armstrong

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    They've delayed it again! This is getting tiresome. If their intent is to wear down the average cycling fan to the point where they don't care anymore, they are succeeding. I love this sport, but antics like this make it very, very difficult to stomach sometimes.
     
  6. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    banned.

    2 years retroactive. He can ride again this August.

    Should have started a charity.
     
  7. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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  8. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    2.4 million euro fine was a bit steep. I bet the UCI will be requesting that all samples from all European events be tested at that lab from now on due to its ability to pick up on minute levels that other labs could not. This case was quite the cash cow for them.
     
  9. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    +1
     
  10. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    And he's banned until August 2012.
     
  11. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    The Contador story has been headlined on British and Irish TV news programmes.
     
  12. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    ok this is non sense, they let Contador compete for 1 1/2 years only to strip him off all the trophies and prize money won during this time... i'll take my stance on Contador's side, edit.= Laurent Jalabert adds another angle to the same issue (the retroactive sanction), " how are going to feel all the cyclists that place 2nd. behind Contador during this time "
     
  13. Yojimbo_

    Yojimbo_ Well-Known Member

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    I don't think they had any choice except to make it retroactive. I think it's the right call given the situation.

    I never did believe the steak story anyways.

    I'd also say that there needs to be some sort of shakeup in Spain for not coming to this conclusion back when it was in their control.
     
  14. ambal

    ambal Active Member

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    The Spanish have a habit of protecting their own. He isn't the first cyclist to receive special treatment, nor is he the first athlete.
     
  15. sopas

    sopas New Member

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    Generally when a rider tests positive everybody turns his back on him, team, media, sponsors, etc.
    In contador's case this has not happened. Not only the Spanish support contador, but also his team (that has just announced a spot featuring Contador to get more clients for the bank), sponsors still trust him, and people like Eddy Merckx, and many other riders and team directors. I'm not saying he is innocent or gilty, just say what I see. In many people's mind Contador is a victim.
     
  16. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    sopas, he is a victim in my mind as well, regardless of guilt or innocence. First, the delay in the process is unfair to the athlete, and in itself leads to suspicion. If both samples test positive above a real and meaningful threshold that has been shown to give a performance advantage in the event, then the penalty should be swift.

    But if what I've read in the press was true, the levels of banned substance found were virtually insignificant, at least a hundred times less than the level found to give performance boost. If the drug is used in legal prescription inhalants, seems to me someone could easily be exposed to trace amounts virtually anywhere. What if someone at the finish line was using the spray for an asthma attack, or worse, sprayed inhalant into the air as he went by intentionally?

    Particularly for legal drugs, I believe a reasonable threshold needs to be set based on performance advantage, taking into account the ability of the lab to reliabily measure. Further, the level was actually many times below the "threshold of detection" capability required for WADA-certified labs. Samples with levels below that level could be noted as "trace, or insignificant", and no action taken. If no other lab in the world could repeat the measurement, how do we know it's even true?

    I'll admit my bias in these cases goes with the athlete. The burden of proof must be on the UCI and WADA, not the athlete. If the B sample must be sent to some special lab for extra-sensitive series of tests, just in an effort to see what we can find against the cyclist, that's not fair, it's a witch hunt or inquisition. Just seems to me the sport has to find a better way here before ruining careers and reputations.

    Note, the "facts" I've read and my interpretation could be all wrong, and Contador could be as guilty as any other drug cheat. But in any event, I can understand how much of the public in Spain would support him.
     
  17. cyclist54

    cyclist54 New Member

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    I was hoping he was innocent. What a blow to our sport. Also a blow to his friend Andy who doesn't want the TDF win this way. That said...I would like to see the governing bodies and the media put as much attention towards doping in all sports, especially baseball and NFL. I think we get the brunt of it because cycling is low hanging fruit for them. Also, the fans actually care that this problem is dealt with. In polls it shows that the baseball fans, for one group, don't seem to care that much about doping. They would rather see someone like Barry Bonds hit it out of the park than to see fair play. Of course, there's action during the entirety of a bike race. In baseball, sometimes the only activity seems to be the grass growing in the outfield. So the fans need more home runs to pick up the slack. Sorry to offend you baseball fans. Just my snarky opinion.
     
  18. doctorSpoc

    doctorSpoc New Member

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    Because the CAS has actually said that the blood doping theory that WADA had is not really possible.. the steak theory of Contador is not likely either.. they said that the most likely theory is that Contador accidentally ingested contaminated food supplement.. but in the end he couldn't prove it and athletes are responsible for what's in their bodies so he was banned.. but the felt that he likely didn't intentionally cheat...

    "The Panel found that there were no established facts that would elevate the possibility of meat contamination to an event that could have occurred on a balance of probabilities. Unlike certain other countries, notably outside Europe, Spain is not known to have a contamination problem with clenbuterol in meat. Furthermore, no other cases of athletes having tested positive to clenbuterol allegedly in connection with the consumption of Spanish meat are known."

    "The Panel concluded that both the meat contamination scenario and the blood transfusion scenario were, in theory, possible explanations for the adverse analytical findings, but were however equally unlikely. In the Panel’s opinion, on the basis of the evidence adduced, the presence of clenbuterol was more likely caused by the ingestion of a contaminated food supplement."

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/contador-cas-to-rule-on-2-4-million-euro-fine-later
     
  19. tonyzackery

    tonyzackery Well-Known Member

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    Ahhh - the ol' 'fairness routine' (or lack thereof), in all its glory. Sure is a 'sad sack' act, if I ever saw one. Poor cycling - the governing bodies are just picking on cyclists for no good reason./img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif

    A mature person (IMO) takes responsibility and is accountable for his/her actions, doesn't try to deflect, nor attempt to put into perspective their own nefarious behavior, and furthermore, neither do they portray themselves as victims. Sure, to do the opposite has apparently become the 'American way' (more accurately it seems, the busted cyclist's way) - most unfortunately so. Cycling needs to clean up its own filthy yard as opposed to looking over the fence at others' yards.

    Want to gripe about disparate treatment of dopers, look no further at the authorities in and out of MLB that have saw to it to destroy BB's livelihood, all the while allowing one Mark McGwire ("I'm not here to talk about the past") to be featured on television while part of the coaching staff of the World Series winning team. Much better placement for a snarky comment, IMO...
     
  20. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Fair: As in Fairytale, a concept taught in grammer school and discounted by the sane if you want survive.
     
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