Conti Grand Prix Supersonic problem...



B

Bob

Guest
I bought a couple of Continental Grand Prix Supersonic tyres (650c) the
other week but only tried to fit them this evening. The front tyre went
on with a bit of a struggle; I had to use the tyre iron in the end as I
physically couldn't get the last six inches over the rim.

The rear tyre went on after about half an hour of struggling, again I
had to resort to the tyre irons to get the damn thing on, but I've
pinched about ten inches of inner tube under the bead. The tyre is so
tight that I can't get my tyre irons under the bead to lift the tyre
off the rim and reset the inner tube.

Has anyone else noticed that these tyres are just a tad on the tight
side...?

I'm going to have to go into the LBS and get them to sort it out as I
know I wont be able to get the tyre off with out knackering the new
inner tube, and damned if I'm paying £27 for a tyre and another £8 for
an inner tube, to ruin them due to the tyre being too tight.

Cheers,

--
bob [at] bobarnott [dot] com http://www.bobarnott.com/
------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Crash programs fail because they are based on theory that,
with nine women pregnant, you can get a baby in a month."
-- Wernher von Braun
 
D

dkahn400

Guest
Bob wrote:

> I'm going to have to go into the LBS and get them to sort it out as I
> know I wont be able to get the tyre off with out knackering the new
> inner tube, and damned if I'm paying £27 for a tyre and another £8 for
> an inner tube, to ruin them due to the tyre being too tight.


With really tight tyres it might be worth putting them on and removing
them a few times without a tube in there in the hope that they will
stretch and get a bit easier. Assuming the LBS sorts it out for you,
what do you then do if you get a puncture 40 miles from home? You need
to be able to fix it at the roadside.

One tip is to make sure the bead is pushed right into the rim well at
the point opposite where you are trying to get the last bit of bead
over the rim. Even so, some combinations of rim and tyre are a real
struggle.

Another thing I've found useful when the tube is pinched is to get the
tyre lever under the tyre by the pinched section but on the opposite
bead. Levering this up a bit, while rolling the other side of the tyre
off the pinch with your other hand, sometimes provides enough room for
the trapped part of the tube to escape. It also helps if you've got a
little bit of air in the tube to start with - just enough to make the
tube squirm when you press it. You are right though to be wary of
inserting the lever at the point where the tube is actually pinched; it
is very easy to tear.

--
Dave...


--
Dave...
 
B

Buck

Guest
On 06/21/2005 09:09:26 "dkahn400" <[email protected]> wrote:

> part of the tube to escape. It also helps if you've got a little bit of
> air in the tube to start with - just enough to make the tube squirm when
> you press it. You are right though to be wary of inserting the lever at


I always put a bit of air in a tube before I fit a tyre.

--

Buck

I would rather be out on my Catrike

http://www.catrike.co.uk
 
P

Peter James

Guest
Buck wrote:
>
> On 06/21/2005 09:09:26 "dkahn400" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>part of the tube to escape. It also helps if you've got a little bit of
>>air in the tube to start with - just enough to make the tube squirm when
>>you press it. You are right though to be wary of inserting the lever at

>
>
> I always put a bit of air in a tube before I fit a tyre.
>

I always put the tube inside the tyre, with a bit of air, and mount the
tyre and tube at the same time. This doesn't _guarantee_ no pinches, but
it significantly reduces the risk. And if the tube is "longer" than the
tyre it gives a better chance of evenly distributing the excess.

--
Peter James
Ottawa, Ontario