Convert Jamis Quest to Touring

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by rothar, Nov 5, 2005.

  1. rothar

    rothar New Member

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    I have a Jamis Quest that I'd like to convert to do some light "credit card" touring. I'm thinking all I need to do is slap on a rack and maybe get some bigger tires. Would anyone recommend anything else? How big do you think I can go with tires? Would existing wheels accomodate a wider tire? As you can guess I'm a relative newbie.
     
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  2. John M

    John M New Member

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    If you are not too big of a person and are not going to carry more than 25 extra pounds or so on the rear rack, you could probably keep the 23mm tires that are probably stock on the bike-just make sure that you have them properly inflated to minimize puncture risk. If you are a big person, or are going to carry a large load, or want to get more comfort, your rims/frame should easily accomodate a 28mm tire.

    Links to more touring info:

    http://www.kenkifer.com/bikepages/touring/
    http://www.bicycle-touring.com/

    There are also several books (see your library, book store, or amazon.com) about getting started in bicycle touring and your local bicycle clubs or bicycle shop will also have tips/info.

    Good luck and enjoy!
     
  3. rothar

    rothar New Member

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    Thanks John. I'm a big boy (200 lbs) and like my comforts. I did 8 days in Spain (Pyreness to Santiago) on a 35 lb converted trail bike a couple of years ago and definitely could have used a little less weight (both me and the bike). Hence the road bike.
     
  4. philso

    philso New Member

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    considering the weight, i think even 28's would be pushing it.

    also, 20 and 24 spokes are rather few, and more or less asking for breakage. 36 is the norm for touring, 32 would be scraping by.

    fender clearance may be problematical, if you're planning on riding on rainy days.

    and you might want a rear cluster with a bigger spread, as large a rear cog as your derailleur will handle, say up to 30 or 32. your 105 for triple up front is probably ok, but to make sure, you can go to the shimano homepage and look up the 105 specs : http://bike.shimano.com/catalog/cycle/products/category.jsp?FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302032852&ASSORTMENT%3C%3East_id=1408474395181202&bmUID=1131259637235
     
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