Convert rear hub of an older bike to Skewer quick release typepossible?



M

markm75

Guest
I have an older schwinn mountain bike.. it has the standard nut type
hub on the rear wheel..

I've recently acquired a trainer, and for the trainer (Minoura rim
drive powermatic system), they use skewers and recommend replacing the
existing skewer to theirs that came with it, which i did with my newer
bike...

Is it possible to convert the older bike's nut type setup to a quick
release skewer setup? Or cost wise.. would it be cheaper to just find
a bike that could be used as a trainer that had the quick release
(used)...

The local bike store said it wouldnt be possible to convert it.

The bike was originally a 10 speed.. with the front sprocket having 2
rings.. i upgraded that awhile back to 3 ring.. i think its 15 speed,
but the back is the part that matters here i think...

Any thoughts?

Thanks
 
M

Mike Vandeman

Guest
On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 12:54:58 -0800 (PST), markm75 <[email protected]>
wrote:

>I have an older schwinn mountain bike.. it has the standard nut type
>hub on the rear wheel..
>
>I've recently acquired a trainer, and for the trainer (Minoura rim
>drive powermatic system), they use skewers and recommend replacing the
>existing skewer to theirs that came with it, which i did with my newer
>bike...
>
>Is it possible to convert the older bike's nut type setup to a quick
>release skewer setup? Or cost wise.. would it be cheaper to just find
>a bike that could be used as a trainer that had the quick release
>(used)...
>
>The local bike store said it wouldnt be possible to convert it.
>
>The bike was originally a 10 speed.. with the front sprocket having 2
>rings.. i upgraded that awhile back to 3 ring.. i think its 15 speed,
>but the back is the part that matters here i think...
>
>Any thoughts?


Yes. Give up mountain biking. You obviously aren't suited for it, and
it harms the environent. Replacing laces on hiking shoes might be more
your speed.

>Thanks

--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Mike Vandeman wrote:
> On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 12:54:58 -0800 (PST), markm75 <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>
>> I have an older schwinn mountain bike.. it has the standard nut type
>> hub on the rear wheel..
>>
>> I've recently acquired a trainer, and for the trainer (Minoura rim
>> drive powermatic system), they use skewers and recommend replacing the
>> existing skewer to theirs that came with it, which i did with my newer
>> bike...
>>
>> Is it possible to convert the older bike's nut type setup to a quick
>> release skewer setup? Or cost wise.. would it be cheaper to just find
>> a bike that could be used as a trainer that had the quick release
>> (used)...
>>
>> The local bike store said it wouldnt be possible to convert it.
>>
>> The bike was originally a 10 speed.. with the front sprocket having 2
>> rings.. i upgraded that awhile back to 3 ring.. i think its 15 speed,
>> but the back is the part that matters here i think...
>>
>> Any thoughts?

>
> Yes. Give up mountain biking. You obviously aren't suited for it, and
> it harms the environent. Replacing laces on hiking shoes might be more
> your speed.
>

Yo Mikey,

How does riding a mountain bicycle inside on a trainer harm natural areas?

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
The weather is here, wish you were beautiful
 

dabac

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2003
2,295
286
83
52
markm75 said:
I have an older schwinn mountain bike.. it has the standard nut type
hub on the rear wheel..

I've recently acquired a trainer, and for the trainer (Minoura rim
drive powermatic system), they use skewers and recommend replacing the
existing skewer to theirs that came with it, which i did with my newer
bike...

Is it possible to convert the older bike's nut type setup to a quick
release skewer setup? Or cost wise.. would it be cheaper to just find
a bike that could be used as a trainer that had the quick release
(used)...

The local bike store said it wouldnt be possible to convert it.

Any thoughts?

First of all I don't know if you have to replace it at all. The impression I got during a limited experience with a tacx trainer was that the trainer-supplied q/r simply was a beefier version of the same theme better suited to the bike/trainer interface and the clamping force of the trainer than the bike supplied one.

A solid axle with nuts should be sturdier than a q/r to begin with, so maybe you merely need some extra axle nuts to provide a good interface for the trainer to clamp on to?

With that said there's a decent chance that the wheel would still be able to convert to q/r.
The thing that might cause trouble is that axles comes in several different threadings, and in order to be able to reuse the current cones the lbs needs to find a hollow axle of the same thread as your solid axle. If such an item can't be found then they'd have to replace the cones as well, which could lead to trouble with the washers and seals not fitting properly.
But for a bike destined for a life indoors seals aren't exactly critical and could very well be ignored w/o much in the way of negative consequences.
 
M

markm75

Guest
On Feb 19, 6:57 am, dabac <[email protected]
mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
> markm75Wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > I have an older schwinn mountain bike.. it has the standard nut type
> > hub on the rear wheel..

>
> > I've recently acquired a trainer, and for the trainer (Minoura rim
> > drive powermatic system), they use skewers and recommend replacing the
> > existing skewer to theirs that came with it, which i did with my newer
> > bike...

>
> > Is it possible to convert the older bike's nut type setup to a quick
> > release skewer setup?  Or cost wise.. would it be cheaper to just find
> > a bike that could be used as a trainer that had the quick release
> > (used)...

>
> > The local bike store said it wouldnt be possible to convert it.

>
> > Any thoughts?

>
> First of all I don't know if you have to replace it at all. The
> impression I got during a limited experience with a tacx trainer was
> that the trainer-supplied q/r simply was a beefier version  of the same
> theme better suited to the bike/trainer interface and the clamping force
> of the trainer than the bike supplied one.
>
> A solid axle with nuts should be sturdier than a q/r to begin with, so
> maybe you merely need some extra axle nuts to provide a good interface
> for the trainer to clamp on to?
>
> With that said there's a decent chance that the wheel would still be
> able to convert to q/r.
> The thing that might cause trouble is that axles comes in several
> different threadings, and in order to be able to reuse the current cones
> the lbs needs to find a hollow axle of the same thread as your solid
> axle. If such an item can't be found then they'd have to replace the
> cones as well, which could lead to trouble with the washers and seals
> not fitting properly.
> But for a bike destined for a life indoors seals aren't exactly
> critical and could very well be ignored w/o much in the way of negative
> consequences.
>
> --
> dabac- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Ah.. so perhaps i should just plop the older bike in the trainer and
see how stable it is.. it certainly couldnt hurt things.. at least
until i go rolling through the big screen lol :)... Ill giver a try at
some point..

The other thing i need to possibly convert is the seat post nut and
bolt.. to the easy release type.. i'm guessing this is possible
without much trouble.
 
M

Mike Vandeman

Guest
On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 21:08:24 -0600, Tom Sherman
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Mike Vandeman wrote:
>> On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 12:54:58 -0800 (PST), markm75 <[email protected]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> I have an older schwinn mountain bike.. it has the standard nut type
>>> hub on the rear wheel..
>>>
>>> I've recently acquired a trainer, and for the trainer (Minoura rim
>>> drive powermatic system), they use skewers and recommend replacing the
>>> existing skewer to theirs that came with it, which i did with my newer
>>> bike...
>>>
>>> Is it possible to convert the older bike's nut type setup to a quick
>>> release skewer setup? Or cost wise.. would it be cheaper to just find
>>> a bike that could be used as a trainer that had the quick release
>>> (used)...
>>>
>>> The local bike store said it wouldnt be possible to convert it.
>>>
>>> The bike was originally a 10 speed.. with the front sprocket having 2
>>> rings.. i upgraded that awhile back to 3 ring.. i think its 15 speed,
>>> but the back is the part that matters here i think...
>>>
>>> Any thoughts?

>>
>> Yes. Give up mountain biking. You obviously aren't suited for it, and
>> it harms the environent. Replacing laces on hiking shoes might be more
>> your speed.
>>

>Yo Mikey,
>
>How does riding a mountain bicycle inside on a trainer harm natural areas?


"Hard-core mountain biking may injure the scrotum"

And cause similar harm to women.

Touche',

Mike


Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2008 09:47:39 -0800
From: Monica Craver <[email protected]>
Subject: From Reuters re: Mtb'er injuries



Hard-core mountain biking may injure the scrotum

Monday, Feb. 18, 2008; 8:27 AM

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Men who are serious about mountain biking
may run a serious risk of injuries to the scrotum, a new study
suggests.

Researchers found that, compared with hard-core male cyclists who
stayed on paved roads, those who biked rugged terrain were more likely
to show abnormalities in ultrasound scans of the scrotum.

Fully 94 percent of the 85 mountain bikers had some form of scrotal
abnormality -- most often calcium deposits or cysts. That compared
with 48 percent of 50 on-road cyclists, the researchers report in the
Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine.

It's not clear what the ultrasound abnormalities mean, including
whether they could affect mountain bikers' fertility, according to the
researchers.

"Further studies should be undertaken to determine the clinical
significance of the sonographic changes," write Dr. Michael
Mitterberger and his colleagues at the Medical University Innsbruck in
Austria.

Biking, whether in rough terrain or on paved roads, has been linked to
impotence in men, and it's thought that pressure from the bike seat
can eventually damage blood vessels and nerves. With mountain biking,
the off-road terrain makes the impact on the groin that much greater
and past research has found that male mountain bikers may have a high
prevalence of scrotal injuries.

The current study included men who biked on- or off-road for at least
two hours per day, six days a week. Despite the many miles on-road
cyclists logged, the percentage with scrotal abnormalities was
significantly less when compared with mountain bikers.

There are measures that serious mountain bikers can take to lessen the
impact from below.

One is to take frequent rests while biking. Padding in both the bike
seat and bike shorts may also help. Experts also recommend that men be
sure that the seat is raised high enough and that it sits at the
proper angle.

According to Mitterberger's team, bikes with shock absorbers and
suspension systems "are mandatory to reduce the potential risk" of
scrotal injuries. However, they add, riders also need to hone their
technical skills to lessen the chances of injury.

SOURCE: Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, January 2008.
--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Mike Vandeman wrote:
> On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 21:08:24 -0600, Tom Sherman
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Mike Vandeman wrote:
>>> On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 12:54:58 -0800 (PST), markm75 <[email protected]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I have an older schwinn mountain bike.. it has the standard nut type
>>>> hub on the rear wheel..
>>>>
>>>> I've recently acquired a trainer, and for the trainer (Minoura rim
>>>> drive powermatic system), they use skewers and recommend replacing the
>>>> existing skewer to theirs that came with it, which i did with my newer
>>>> bike...
>>>>
>>>> Is it possible to convert the older bike's nut type setup to a quick
>>>> release skewer setup? Or cost wise.. would it be cheaper to just find
>>>> a bike that could be used as a trainer that had the quick release
>>>> (used)...
>>>>
>>>> The local bike store said it wouldnt be possible to convert it.
>>>>
>>>> The bike was originally a 10 speed.. with the front sprocket having 2
>>>> rings.. i upgraded that awhile back to 3 ring.. i think its 15 speed,
>>>> but the back is the part that matters here i think...
>>>>
>>>> Any thoughts?
>>> Yes. Give up mountain biking. You obviously aren't suited for it, and
>>> it harms the environent. Replacing laces on hiking shoes might be more
>>> your speed.
>>>

>> Yo Mikey,
>>
>> How does riding a mountain bicycle inside on a trainer harm natural areas?

>
> "Hard-core mountain biking may injure the scrotum"
>
> And cause similar harm to women.
>
> Touche',
>

When did riding a trainer in the living room become "hard-core mountain
biking"?

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
The weather is here, wish you were beautiful
 
M

Mike Vandeman

Guest
On Tue, 19 Feb 2008 20:22:35 -0600, Tom Sherman
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Mike Vandeman wrote:
>> On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 21:08:24 -0600, Tom Sherman
>> <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>> Mike Vandeman wrote:
>>>> On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 12:54:58 -0800 (PST), markm75 <[email protected]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I have an older schwinn mountain bike.. it has the standard nut type
>>>>> hub on the rear wheel..
>>>>>
>>>>> I've recently acquired a trainer, and for the trainer (Minoura rim
>>>>> drive powermatic system), they use skewers and recommend replacing the
>>>>> existing skewer to theirs that came with it, which i did with my newer
>>>>> bike...
>>>>>
>>>>> Is it possible to convert the older bike's nut type setup to a quick
>>>>> release skewer setup? Or cost wise.. would it be cheaper to just find
>>>>> a bike that could be used as a trainer that had the quick release
>>>>> (used)...
>>>>>
>>>>> The local bike store said it wouldnt be possible to convert it.
>>>>>
>>>>> The bike was originally a 10 speed.. with the front sprocket having 2
>>>>> rings.. i upgraded that awhile back to 3 ring.. i think its 15 speed,
>>>>> but the back is the part that matters here i think...
>>>>>
>>>>> Any thoughts?
>>>> Yes. Give up mountain biking. You obviously aren't suited for it, and
>>>> it harms the environent. Replacing laces on hiking shoes might be more
>>>> your speed.
>>>>
>>> Yo Mikey,
>>>
>>> How does riding a mountain bicycle inside on a trainer harm natural areas?

>>
>> "Hard-core mountain biking may injure the scrotum"
>>
>> And cause similar harm to women.
>>
>> Touche',
>>

>When did riding a trainer in the living room become "hard-core mountain
>biking"?


Use your imagination. Do I have to spell out everything for you?
--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande