Converting a bike?

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by cycling_jedi, Aug 15, 2006.

  1. cycling_jedi

    cycling_jedi New Member

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    Would it be possible to convert my generic mountain bike into a road bike? I know the frame is heavy compared to a true road bike frame, but I am not trying to win any races.... The only problem I can see is that mountain bikes are usually measured in inches while road bikes are in cm which might make finding compatible parts difficult.

    Has anyone done this before?
     
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  2. Savagewolf

    Savagewolf New Member

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    I don't see why you couldn't do so. Every little part you could want is out there, ready to be used.

    The effort isn't worth the result though, I would think. Besides dealing with the headache of finding the right parts, you'll also have to deal with the expense of the conversion and the lack of performance compared to a normal road bike.

    You'd probely be better off just to buy a lower price tag road bike rather than trying to convert your mountain bike.
     
  3. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Yes ...

    The attached picture is my spare parts bike -- an extra 16.5" hardtail frame with 700c wheels (135mm rear hub, of course) ... road fork ... Tektro long reach calipers ... FSA Gossamer with 118mm ISIS BB ... 105 shifters & rear derailleur ... XT front derailleur.

    Current stem position is flipped "down" ... I still have to tape the handlebars ...
     
  4. guidosan

    guidosan New Member

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    It might be possible, but it could get expensive. I converted a hardtail bike to what I call a pseudo-road bike. I kept the mtn rims but put on 1.25 slicks, changed the cassette and cranks, drop bars with bar-con shifters and road brake levers. Also changed the fork to a mtn fork with no suspension. This is really just a project bike for me and it helped me to learn how to do my own wrenching.
    The question is why do you want to do it? If you just want to go a bit faster on the road, slicks will help a lot and won’t break the bank doing so. Then you can start to change the cassette for better gearing. This is the least amount you can do and keep the cost down a little.
    But if it is to save money, you would be better off buying even an entry level road bike. You should take an inventory of all that you want to change, and then see how many parts you have in your spare parts box. Then add up the cost to buy the rest of the parts. Don't forget the unobvious like new cables and housing. Also if you have linear pull brakes, they won’t work with road levers unless you get a travel agent too. Cantilever brakes are okay though.
    The other issue would be how the bike fits you once you convert it. You could be too stretched out with the road bars on. The hoods could be several inches further out on the road bars. Then you may need a really short stem to get it back toward you.
     
  5. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    The brifters are what kills you financially. They are the reason I decided not to convert my mtb.

    The wheelset will probabaly be an impediment vs a good road wheelset because the spoke count and weight will be higher.

    Suspension forks are not unheard of in road racing; just get a stiff spring. Not only will they cope with big hits but the moving parts & seals & stuff will probabaly cut down on buzz fairly well.
     
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