converting a road hub to a track hub?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Colin Campbell, Feb 21, 2003.

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  1. I want to make a road hub into a track hub. I have replaced the axle. Is a track hub wider. I can't
    seem to get a proper measurement because my track hubs are already laced up to wheels.

    Thanx in advance. CC
     
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  2. Phil Holman

    Phil Holman Guest

    "Colin Campbell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I want to make a road hub into a track hub. I have replaced the axle. Is a track hub wider. I
    > can't seem to get a proper measurement because my track hubs are already laced up to wheels.

    The front is the same as road, the rear is narrower - 120mm.

    Phil Holman
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Colin Campbell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I want to make a road hub into a track hub. I have replaced the axle. Is a track hub wider. I
    > can't seem to get a proper measurement because my track hubs are already laced up to wheels.

    Not sure what you are asking here.

    A road hub normally cannot be machined smaller on the right side for a reverse-threaded lockring
    because the thickness of the shell at the threads is insufficient. So making a "road hub into a
    track hub" literally is likely impossible in most cases.

    Overall locknut-to-locknut spacing is 110mm on a track hub. Road hubs are 120mm ( five speed)
    through 130mm ( eight speed). If that's what you are asking, measure the frame you're using, the
    existing hub and look at the chainline possibilities. Many fixed (and single) setups for urban
    commuting are complete bastards in this regard and they work just fine. My own is nonstandard
    with a wider than stock spacing because it's running in a non-alignable Kestrel. Steel frames are
    more variable.

    True track hubshells are wider between the flanges than road hubs. Doesn't make a lot of difference
    but there's another example of why you can't make "road hub into a track hub".
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  4. Tom Paterson

    Tom Paterson Guest

    >From: "A Muzi"

    >True track hubshells are wider between the flanges than road hubs. Doesn't make a lot of difference
    >but there's another example of why you can't make "road hub into a track hub".

    Just for info, I measured about one cm difference between a road small flange and track high
    flange. I used a "converted" low flange road hub (no lockring, allen bolt replacing QR per regs)
    on the track a few times with no apparent problems. (Alkek, with "only" 33 deg. max banking.)
    --Tom Paterson
     
  5. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > >From: "A Muzi" True track hubshells are wider between the flanges than road hubs.
    Doesn't
    > >make a lot of difference but there's another example of why you can't
    make
    > >"road hub into a track hub".

    "Tom Paterson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Just for info, I measured about one cm difference between a road small
    flange
    > and track high flange. I used a "converted" low flange road hub (no lockring, allen bolt
    replacing QR
    > per regs) on the track a few times with no apparent problems. (Alkek, with "only" 33 deg. max
    > banking.) --Tom Paterson

    Yes, as I indicated about my own bike, many intermediate formats work just fine.

    I was descending into semantics, trying to find out what part of "track hub" he was aiming for.
    There are several differences, not all of which are critical to a given application, as you note.

    (I also noted an earlier 110mm track OLD which nowadays is 120mm)
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  6. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >Just for info, I measured about one cm difference between a road small flange and track high
    >flange. I used a "converted" low flange road hub (no lockring, allen bolt replacing QR per regs) on
    >the track a few times with no apparent problems. (Alkek, with "only" 33 deg. max banking.)

    People commonly do this and get away with it, but a true track hub has a reverse threaded lock ring
    none the less and for obvious reasons.

    Jon Isaacs
     
  7. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Jon Isaacs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >Just for info, I measured about one cm difference between a road small
    flange
    > >and track high flange. I used a "converted" low flange road hub (no lockring, allen bolt
    replacing
    > >QR per regs) on the track a few times with no apparent problems. (Alkek,
    with
    > >"only" 33 deg. max banking.)
    >
    > People commonly do this and get away with it, but a true track hub has a reverse threaded lock
    > ring none the less and for obvious reasons.
    >
    > Jon Isaacs

    Yeah, but I race track and still don't use the darn thing. Gets in the way too often...

    I've done several of these conversions over the years. If I remember right, there should be appx
    16mm of spacers between the bearings on the FW side of the hub and the frame. The axle should be
    appx 165mm for AL dropouts, or a little shorter for steel. I've been having very good luck with
    American Classic FW hubs lately. I just built a Zipp 340 into a wheel using an American Classic FW
    hub and their track axle kit. Should be a nice-riding wheel once I get the tire glued on.

    The last "regular" hub I respaced was a Sansin/Specialized sealed bearing hub. It worked fine for my
    commuting back and forth up and down some serious hills in the Washington DC area. You may be able
    to use the axle that is in the hub now depending on your dropouts. If not, then your LBS should have
    something that'll work.

    You'll have to eyeball the chainline to make sure that the numbers I gave you above are right.
    Adjust accordingly. Make sure that the cog is tight because there's not going to be a lockring.

    If the wheel is already built, you'll have to re-dish. The nice thing is that there won't really be
    any dish once you're done. Your wheel should turn out fairly symmetrical. (read: stronger)

    It is more fun to make things work, but you have to be ready for the frustration when you're trying
    to get something to do things it isn't designed for.

    Good luck!

    Mike
     
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