converting to quick release

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Linda Christie, Apr 29, 2003.

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  1. is it possible to convert a non-quick release wheel to quick release? is this a stupid question?
    sorry but i just had to ask.
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, Linda Christie
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >is it possible to convert a non-quick release wheel to quick release?

    Generally yes, depending on the type of hub.
     
  3. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] (Linda Christie) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > is it possible to convert a non-quick release wheel to quick release? is this a stupid question?
    > sorry but i just had to ask.

    no question is stupid. i have to tell myself that, becuase i ask a lot myself.

    If the axle on your hub is a 'normal' axle, ie: it is a threaded rod that goes through the hub, and
    a nut clamps down on it from each side, then you should be able to.

    however, there are all kinds of axles. your axle has a diameter (like 10mm, or 9.5, etc), and a
    thread spec (26 threads per inch, etc). to use all the hardware like the spacers and cones inside
    your hub, you need to get a matching axle.

    what changes is

    a) your new axle for quick release will be hollow
    b) the length gets shorter, because the axle needs to sit inside the dropouts, so that the quick
    release clamps on the dropout face, not the axle. waht length the axle needs to be depends on
    what spacing your bike is. i think the modern standard is 130 for road, 135 for mtb, and it
    changes for old, tandem, and otherwise eccentric breeds.

    anthony
     
  4. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] (ant) wrote in message
    > what changes is

    > b) the length gets shorter, because the axle needs to sit inside the dropouts, so that the quick
    > release clamps on the dropout face, not the axle. waht length the axle needs to be depends on
    > what spacing your bike is. i think the modern standard is 130 for road, 135 for mtb, and it
    > changes for old, tandem, and otherwise eccentric breeds.

    I realize now that my post is confusing- The rear dropout spacing is not the same as the length of
    axle you need. Ie: If you have a modern road bike with 130 mm spacing between the dropouts, you do
    not need a 130 mm axle. You need slightly longer so that there is some axle sticking out into each
    dropout, but not enough that it is flush with the outside of the dropout face. For instance, if your
    dropouts are 5 mm thick, and your hub spacing is 130mm, then an axle length of 136 mm would probably
    be fine. I imagine that axles are already pre-cut to appropriate lengths for various spacings, so
    any guesswork will be eliminated.
     
  5. christie-<< is it possible to convert a non-quick release wheel to quick release? is this a
    stupid question?

    There are no stupid questions, just stupid answers.

    yes you can, all you need is hollow axles of the same thread pitch as the solid ones(for the cones
    and nuts), ,proper length for your frameset and a quick release and a good wrench to do it all.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  6. [email protected] (Linda Christie) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > is it possible to convert a non-quick release wheel to quick release? is this a stupid question?
    > sorry but i just had to ask.

    Sure you can. I just did it for my wife's old Fuji. I had to buy a hollow axle with bearing cones,
    locknuts and spacers (came in a kit) plus a Quick Release lever. It all came to about $30 at my
    LBS. Take your wheel to the bike store to be sure of getting the right parts. If, first, you remove
    your old axle by removing the LEFT side lock nut and cone, you might save a few dollars of
    disassembly charge.

    If it is for a rear wheel, you will need to pull the freewheel (I assume your bike is older and has
    one of these.) If you do not have a puller, your LBS can do it for you.

    Doing the job consists of making the spacers be the same length as the spacers on your old axle.
    Then, from the right side, first screw on the cone, then slide on the spacers then screw on and
    tighten (very tight) the lock nut so that 5 mm of axle sticks out to the right, beyond the lock nut
    face. Re-assemble the axle and bearings in the hub, and adjust the left cone and lock nut so that
    there is no side to side play in the axle. Measure 5 mm out beyond the lock nut face on the left and
    mark it. Remove the axle and cut it with a hack saw or, better yet, a Dremmel cut off tool. De-burr
    the cut end, remove the cutting debris, clean, grease and re-install everything and you're almost
    done. The last thing to do is to install the new QR lever, mount the wheel on the bike and look at
    the length of the rod. If it sticks out beyond the QR nut, cut off the excess. Now, you are done

    You can avoid all the above work by buying a new wheel. A cheapo wheel will cost around $60 at your
    LBS...less via mail order.

    Good luck Steve
     
  7. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] (Steve Shapiro) wrote in message
    >
    > Sure you can. I just did it for my wife's old Fuji.

    <detailed technical explanation snipped>

    >I had to buy a hollow axle with bearing cones, locknuts and spacers (came in a kit) plus a Quick
    >Release lever. It all came to about $30 at my LBS. You can avoid all the above work by buying a new
    >wheel. A cheapo wheel will cost around $60 at your LBS...less via mail order.

    To the OP: unless I am missing something, or you have an odd setup, you should not feel compelled
    to buy a kit, nor a new wheel. Although these options can save time, the only new piece you Really
    need is a hollow axle that matches your current hardware. I believe these run around 12 dollars or
    less. If you don't have a skewer lying around (or don't live in an area where there are hundreds of
    rusted dead wheels locked to fences where the rest of the bike has been stolen) then that would run
    you a few more.

    cheers
     
  8. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] (Steve Shapiro) wrote in message
    >
    > Sure you can. I just did it for my wife's old Fuji.

    <detailed technical explanation snipped>

    >I had to buy a hollow axle with bearing cones, locknuts and spacers (came in a kit) plus a Quick
    >Release lever. It all came to about $30 at my LBS. You can avoid all the above work by buying a new
    >wheel. A cheapo wheel will cost around $60 at your LBS...less via mail order.

    To the OP: unless I am missing something, or you have an odd setup, you should not feel compelled
    to buy a kit, nor a new wheel. Although these options can save time, the only new piece you Really
    need is a hollow axle that matches your current hardware. I believe these run around 12 dollars or
    less. If you don't have a skewer lying around (or don't live in an area where there are hundreds of
    rusted dead wheels locked to fences where the rest of the bike has been stolen) then that would run
    you a few more.

    cheers
     
  9. many thanks to all the people (and insects!) :) who replied to my question, i'm gonna give it a try
    this weekend...

    "ant" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Steve Shapiro) wrote in message
    > >
    > > Sure you can. I just did it for my wife's old Fuji.
    >
    > <detailed technical explanation snipped>
    >
    > >I had to buy a hollow axle with bearing cones, locknuts and spacers (came in a kit) plus a Quick
    > >Release lever. It all came to about $30 at my LBS. You can avoid all the above work by buying a
    > >new wheel. A cheapo wheel will cost around $60 at your LBS...less via mail order.
    >
    >
    > To the OP: unless I am missing something, or you have an odd setup, you should not feel compelled
    > to buy a kit, nor a new wheel. Although these options can save time, the only new piece you Really
    > need is a hollow axle that matches your current hardware. I believe these run around 12 dollars or
    > less. If you don't have a skewer lying around (or don't live in an area where there are hundreds
    > of rusted dead wheels locked to fences where the rest of the bike has been stolen) then that would
    > run you a few more.
    >
    > cheers
     
  10. [email protected] (ant) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Steve Shapiro) wrote in message
    > >
    > > Sure you can. I just did it for my wife's old Fuji.
    >
    > <detailed technical explanation snipped>
    >
    > >I had to buy a hollow axle with bearing cones, locknuts and spacers (came in a kit) plus a Quick
    > >Release lever. It all came to about $30 at my LBS. You can avoid all the above work by buying a
    > >new wheel. A cheapo wheel will cost around $60 at your LBS...less via mail order.
    >
    >
    > To the OP: unless I am missing something, or you have an odd setup, you should not feel compelled
    > to buy a kit, nor a new wheel. Although these options can save time, the only new piece you Really
    > need is a hollow axle that matches your current hardware. I believe these run around 12 dollars or
    > less. If you don't have a skewer lying around (or don't live in an area where there are hundreds
    > of rusted dead wheels locked to fences where the rest of the bike has been stolen) then that would
    > run you a few more.
    >
    > cheers

    Anthony is correct, if you have the stuff use it. I would have, but I didn't, I decided to buy it,
    so am able to say what it costs to buy the stuff. You can decide if it's worth it, but please don't
    be put off by the term "kit." It was no more then $14.00 for the axle, cones and spacers "kit."
    Plus, it was the LBS answer to my question, "What's the cheapest way to buy the necessary parts to
    skewerize the wheel?" Also, putting new cones on an 18 year old wheel isn't such a bad thing. The
    skewer itself was expensive at about $12.

    Still, 27 or 30 dollars seems like a lot of money to spend on an old, low end aluminum wheel. My
    motivation was to eliminate the 14mm box wrench from the tool kit I carry when I ride with my wife
    which is often. In fact, I ended up spending more on the wheel: the old "rustless" spokes had frozen
    in the nipples so, add in the cost of 36 ss spokes and nipples and you could easly accuse me of
    guilding the
    lilly. Along the way, I polished up all the aluminum parts so the old wheel does, truly, look and
    roll like new again.

    Steve
     
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