Cook pork shoulder to temperature?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Darryl L. Pierc, Mar 7, 2004.

  1. When I make a pot roast using a good cut of chuck, I don't
    cook to any specific temperature. Instead, I sear it on
    both sides and then cook it in a 170-200F oven for at least
    5-6 hours.

    Tonite, I picked up a nice pork shoulder. In searching
    recipes, each is calling for cooking it to a specific
    temperature (~170F) and then removing it from the oven.

    Would it be a bad idea to continue cooking it, or is there
    no reason to do so; ie., is there not enough collagen in the
    pork shoulder to require further cooking to render it?

    --
    Darryl L. Pierce <[email protected]> Visit the Infobahn
    Offramp - <http://mypage.org/mcpierce> "What do you care
    what other people think, Mr. Feynman?"
     
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  2. "Darryl L. Pierce" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Would it be a bad idea to continue cooking it, or is there
    > no reason to do so; ie., is there not enough collagen in
    > the pork shoulder to require further cooking to render it?
    >

    Shoulders are tough. I'd cook it slow to break down the
    collagen. It I was going by temperature, 170 to 180 should
    do it. Collagen breaks down at 160, but it has to remain
    there for a time. Ed
     
  3. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Darryl L. Pierce wrote:

    > When I make a pot roast using a good cut of chuck, I don't
    > cook to any specific temperature. Instead, I sear it on
    > both sides and then cook it in a 170-200F oven for at
    > least 5-6 hours.
    >
    > Tonite, I picked up a nice pork shoulder. In searching
    > recipes, each is calling for cooking it to a specific
    > temperature (~170F) and then removing it from the oven.
    >
    > Would it be a bad idea to continue cooking it, or is there
    > no reason to do so; ie., is there not enough collagen in
    > the pork shoulder to require further cooking to render it?

    I cook them to temperature. I just did a couple boneless
    shoulders a few days ago. Took them out of the fridge 2
    hours before cook time. Rubbed them with a spice mixture
    and put them into a 250F oven. Cooked them to 145, let
    them rest for 20 minutes and the residual heat brought
    them up to 154F.

    Tender, moist. Wonderful served as sliced pork that day.
    Cold sliced on sandwiches later. Also did some in wraps.
    Cubed some for a salad.

    Pastorio
     
  4. Bob (this one) wrote:

    >> When I make a pot roast using a good cut of chuck, I
    >> don't cook to any specific temperature. Instead, I sear
    >> it on both sides and then cook it in a 170-200F oven for
    >> at least 5-6 hours.
    >>
    >> Tonite, I picked up a nice pork shoulder. In searching
    >> recipes, each is calling for cooking it to a specific
    >> temperature (~170F) and then removing it from the oven.
    >>
    >> Would it be a bad idea to continue cooking it, or is
    >> there no reason to do so; ie., is there not enough
    >> collagen in the pork shoulder to require further cooking
    >> to render it?
    >
    > I cook them to temperature. I just did a couple boneless
    > shoulders a few days ago. Took them out of the fridge 2
    > hours before cook time. Rubbed them with a spice mixture
    > and put them into a 250F oven. Cooked them to 145, let
    > them rest for 20 minutes and the residual heat brought
    > them up to 154F.
    >
    > Tender, moist. Wonderful served as sliced pork that day.
    > Cold sliced on sandwiches later. Also did some in wraps.
    > Cubed some for a salad.

    And this was pork shoulder? I would have thought that, like
    beef shoulder, there would be alot of connective tissue that
    needed rendering by longer cooking. So there's no collagen
    to dissolve in the cooking process? (obviously, I've not
    cooked much pork <g>)

    --
    Darryl L. Pierce <[email protected]> Visit the Infobahn
    Offramp - <http://mypage.org/mcpierce> "What do you care
    what other people think, Mr. Feynman?"
     
  5. Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

    >> Would it be a bad idea to continue cooking it, or is
    >> there no reason to do so; ie., is there not enough
    >> collagen in the pork shoulder to require further cooking
    >> to render it?
    >>
    >
    > Shoulders are tough. I'd cook it slow to break down the
    > collagen. It I was going by temperature, 170 to 180 should
    > do it. Collagen breaks down at 160, but it has to remain
    > there for a time.

    That's what I figured. I'm planning on treating it like a
    beef shoulder and searing it before putting it in the oven
    for the day. The way I cook pot roast beef is:

    1. heat up the DO on the stove top
    2. sprinkle with a good dose of salt, some fresh ground
    pepper and cumin (love that stuff)
    3. put a shot of canola oil on the meat and rub on both
    sides for better heat transfer, then
    4. sear it for about 2-3 minutes per side (Maillard
    reaction)
    5. add the vegetables, some beef broth, and slip it into the
    oven for 6-7 hours at 170-200F.

    I'll change the spices (not sure about cumin with pork, and
    want something to do a similar complement) and try doing the
    same with the pork shoulder tomorrow.

    --
    Darryl L. Pierce <[email protected]> Visit the Infobahn
    Offramp - <http://mypage.org/mcpierce> "What do you care
    what other people think, Mr. Feynman?"
     
  6. Scubapix

    Scubapix Guest

    "Darryl L. Pierce" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > When I make a pot roast using a good cut of chuck, I don't
    > cook to any specific temperature. Instead, I sear it on
    > both sides and then cook it in a 170-200F oven for at
    > least 5-6 hours.
    >
    > Tonite, I picked up a nice pork shoulder. In searching
    > recipes, each is calling for cooking it to a specific
    > temperature (~170F) and then removing it from the oven.
    >
    > Would it be a bad idea to continue cooking it, or is there
    > no reason to do so; ie., is there not enough collagen in
    > the pork shoulder to require further cooking to render it?
    >
    Like Ed said, cook low and slow (225-250ºF) to break down
    the collogen. But first, put a little yellow mustard all
    over (just a little, and don't worry. You won't taste it.).
    Then make up a rub (lots of recipes on the internet ot just
    use salt & pepper). Cook it to an internal temp of 170-180ºF
    if you want to slice it or 200-205ºF if you want to pull it.
    Depending on the size of the shoulder (and whether its a
    picnic or a butt), this will take from 6-22 hours, or more.
    The time depends on size and final temp.

    Good luck.
     
  7. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Darryl L. Pierce wrote:

    > Bob (this one) wrote:
    >
    >>>When I make a pot roast using a good cut of chuck, I
    >>>don't cook to any specific temperature. Instead, I sear
    >>>it on both sides and then cook it in a 170-200F oven for
    >>>at least 5-6 hours.
    >>>
    >>>Tonite, I picked up a nice pork shoulder. In searching
    >>>recipes, each is calling for cooking it to a specific
    >>>temperature (~170F) and then removing it from the oven.
    >>>
    >>>Would it be a bad idea to continue cooking it, or is
    >>>there no reason to do so; ie., is there not enough
    >>>collagen in the pork shoulder to require further cooking
    >>>to render it?
    >>
    >>I cook them to temperature. I just did a couple boneless
    >>shoulders a few days ago. Took them out of the fridge 2
    >>hours before cook time. Rubbed them with a spice mixture
    >>and put them into a 250F oven. Cooked them to 145, let
    >>them rest for 20 minutes and the residual heat brought
    >>them up to 154F.
    >>
    >>Tender, moist. Wonderful served as sliced pork that day.
    >>Cold sliced on sandwiches later. Also did some in wraps.
    >>Cubed some for a salad.
    >
    > And this was pork shoulder? I would have thought that,
    > like beef shoulder, there would be alot of connective
    > tissue that needed rendering by longer cooking. So there's
    > no collagen to dissolve in the cooking process?
    > (obviously, I've not cooked much pork <g>)

    There's some, but the musculature of the two critters is
    very different. Pigs have much less connective tissue and
    the individual muscles are smaller. There is some gristle
    that runs through a small part of it, but I'm willing to
    live with that to keep the meat moist and tender. And, in
    any event, it can be trimmed before service if you want.

    I buy boneless, skinless shoulders. Most of the surface
    connective tissue is trimmed out already and just a thin
    layer of fat remains. Inside, removing the bones, tendons
    and ligaments means that the internal connective tissues
    have been largely removed. Thin layers between muscles don't
    much matter in the finished roast.

    Slices cleanly. And can be sliced on my slicer paper-thin if
    I want to. Cooked more, to 150F or more, the denatured
    protein makes it difficult to do that. Cooked to BBQ levels
    means that slices can only be done rather more thickly.

    The final determinant of a sense of moistness in the meat is
    the degree of doneness it's cooked to. The more cooked, the
    drier. Adding water or stock to the pan won't keep the meat
    more moist. Low-temp roasting can help to preserve a bit of
    that moist mouthfeel by softening the collagen. The gelatin
    adds what seems to be a fat mouthfeel, but without fat. I
    find that if I don't either cut or cook enough out, it eats
    "sticky." That's why I like to get it out up front and just
    cook the meat to medium.

    The other reason I like to cook it this way is the yield.
    More comes out of the oven in the end than if I cooked it
    either at a higher temp or to a greater degree of doneness.
    I don't much like today's pork cooked to the high internal
    temperatures that they did when pork was fattier. If I'm
    making pulled BBQ, I'll cook it to about 195 where it begins
    to fall apart all by itself, but I don't do that often.
    Rather have a roast in a single piece that I can slice or
    chunk for various dishes. YMMV.

    Pastorio
     
  8. SCUBApix wrote:

    > Like Ed said, cook low and slow (225-250ºF) to break down
    > the collogen. But first, put a little yellow mustard all
    > over (just a little, and don't worry. You won't taste
    > it.). Then make up a rub (lots of recipes on the internet
    > ot just use salt & pepper). Cook it to an internal temp of
    > 170-180ºF if you want to slice it or 200-205ºF if you want
    > to pull it. Depending on the size of the shoulder (and
    > whether its a picnic or a butt), this will take from 6-22
    > hours, or more. The time depends on size and final temp.

    This one is a 4.5lb picnic shoulder. I guess what I'll do,
    then, is put sear it early tomorrow morning, put it in the
    DO in a 200F oven and cook it until dinner time (about 11
    hours). I'm looking for something similar in consistency to
    pot roast; i.e., fork tender.

    > Good luck.

    Thanks. :)

    --
    Darryl L. Pierce <[email protected]> Visit the Infobahn
    Offramp - <http://mypage.org/mcpierce> "What do you care
    what other people think, Mr. Feynman?"
     
  9. For football games, I usually do a 10# or greater shoulder
    with the skin/fat cap still on. It goes into a 275 oven till
    the internal temp gets to 195. I turn off the oven, cover it
    in foil, place it back in for 30 minutes and then shreds
    easily with two large forks. Any bones come right out and
    makes for some mean leftovers.

    Evan
     
  10. Pavane

    Pavane Guest

    "Evan in Orlando" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > For football games, I usually do a 10# or greater shoulder
    > with the skin/fat cap still on. It goes into a 275 oven
    > till the internal temp gets to 195. I turn off the oven,
    > cover it in foil, place it back in for 30 minutes and then
    > shreds easily with two large forks. Any bones come right
    > out and makes for some mean leftovers.
    >
    > Evan
    >

    Your preferred seasonings?

    pavane
     
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