cookery course?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by bob, Mar 11, 2006.

  1. bob

    bob Guest

    does anyone know of a good book or online course that teaches you the
    science behind cooking? i not so much after recipe after recipe
    (although i except that maybe the best way to learn is to cook - and
    eat!!). by science i guess i mean what flavours/ingredients work well
    together. e.g. if i have a vension steak then what vegetable, sauce,
    herbs, spices, methods of cooking for each etc etc might work. from
    this i can then build my own recipes knowing that fundamentally the
    flavours will work. any thoughts?
     
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  2. aem

    aem Guest

    bob wrote:
    > does anyone know of a good book or online course that teaches you the
    > science behind cooking? i not so much after recipe after recipe
    > (although i except that maybe the best way to learn is to cook - and
    > eat!!). by science i guess i mean what flavours/ingredients work well
    > together. e.g. if i have a vension steak then what vegetable, sauce,
    > herbs, spices, methods of cooking for each etc etc might work. from
    > this i can then build my own recipes knowing that fundamentally the
    > flavours will work. any thoughts?


    Quite a few years ago, before he became such a tv celebrity, Jacques
    Pepin wrote two books that would meet a lot of your needs: La
    Technique and La Methode. They have recently been combined into one
    paperback volume called "Jacques Pepin's Complete Techniques." They
    don't address your specific interest in complementary spices and herbs
    as directly as you might want but I don't know of anything that does.
    I learned a great deal from these books and I'm happy to have this
    chance to publicize their new incarnation. -aem
     
  3. bob wrote:

    >does anyone know of a good book or online course that teaches you the
    >science behind cooking? i not so much after recipe after recipe
    >(although i except that maybe the best way to learn is to cook - and
    >eat!!). by science i guess i mean what flavours/ingredients work well
    >together. e.g. if i have a vension steak then what vegetable, sauce,
    >herbs, spices, methods of cooking for each etc etc might work. from
    >this i can then build my own recipes knowing that fundamentally the
    >flavours will work. any thoughts?
    >
    >
    >

    Absolutely the best book is Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking". It
    explains the science behind just about everything, and it's perfectly
    comprehensible to ordinary mortals. The new edition came out just last year.

    Christine
     
  4. Lefty

    Lefty Guest

    In general terms these days the whole internet is a textbook and can often
    provide a more comprehensive and better world-view of food and processes
    than a course or a particular book. In the midst of a general approach at
    the beginning, more specifc materials that pertain to your tastes will come
    to light if you want to narrow down to any particular area of cooking.

    For example, I was introduced to Morroccan cooking by eating a "Morrocan
    Stew" at a restaurant. All I could remember was that the recipe contained
    lamb and olives --I was very impressed by the olives; had never heard of
    olives in stew. Even with a pretty well-rounded library of western cookbooks
    I could not find a stew with olives. Until I did research on the internet
    and was introduced to "tagines" and the rest of Morroccan tastes, I would
    never have known of anything Morrocan from all the cookbooks on my shelves.

    My suggestion is to surf, surf, surf, beginning with foods you know
    something about, and explore every new thing you come across. Sometimes one
    Google search can provide a college semester or more worth of material on a
    subject. I have found that access to rfc and other groups is better than any
    book.

    Lefty
    --
    Life is for learning


    "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > bob wrote:
    > > does anyone know of a good book or online course that teaches you the
    > > science behind cooking? i not so much after recipe after recipe
    > > (although i except that maybe the best way to learn is to cook - and
    > > eat!!). by science i guess i mean what flavours/ingredients work well
    > > together. e.g. if i have a vension steak then what vegetable, sauce,
    > > herbs, spices, methods of cooking for each etc etc might work. from
    > > this i can then build my own recipes knowing that fundamentally the
    > > flavours will work. any thoughts?

    >
    > Quite a few years ago, before he became such a tv celebrity, Jacques
    > Pepin wrote two books that would meet a lot of your needs: La
    > Technique and La Methode. They have recently been combined into one
    > paperback volume called "Jacques Pepin's Complete Techniques." They
    > don't address your specific interest in complementary spices and herbs
    > as directly as you might want but I don't know of anything that does.
    > I learned a great deal from these books and I'm happy to have this
    > chance to publicize their new incarnation. -aem
    >
     
  5. RoR

    RoR Guest

    On Sun, 12 Mar 2006 15:52:08 GMT, "Lefty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In general terms these days the whole internet is a textbook and can often
    >provide a more comprehensive and better world-view of food and processes
    >than a course or a particular book. In the midst of a general approach at
    >the beginning, more specifc materials that pertain to your tastes will come
    >to light if you want to narrow down to any particular area of cooking.
    >
    >For example, I was introduced to Morroccan cooking by eating a "Morrocan
    >Stew" at a restaurant. All I could remember was that the recipe contained
    >lamb and olives --I was very impressed by the olives; had never heard of
    >olives in stew. Even with a pretty well-rounded library of western cookbooks
    >I could not find a stew with olives. Until I did research on the internet
    >and was introduced to "tagines" and the rest of Morroccan tastes, I would
    >never have known of anything Morrocan from all the cookbooks on my shelves.
    >
    >My suggestion is to surf, surf, surf, beginning with foods you know
    >something about, and explore every new thing you come across. Sometimes one
    >Google search can provide a college semester or more worth of material on a
    >subject. I have found that access to rfc and other groups is better than any
    >book.
    >
    >Lefty



    Try "On Food And Cooking" by Harold McGee. It has plenty of science, and tons of good
    information. I was able to garner a lot of this goes with this info because of the
    science. If it's one type of food and another would compliment it (McGee does a fair
    amount of that type of thing) it is easy to extrapolate to other similar situations.

    Then, experiment, pay attention in restaurants, ask questions - even restaurants will
    share a lot if information if asked correctly.





    --
    Rick R
    [email protected]ult
    replace default with com to email
     
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