cooking brown rice in presto cooker

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Annabellattheba, Feb 24, 2004.

  1. I usually cook white rice in a presto rice cooker, comes out very nice. I am trying to eat more
    brown rice but not sure if I can cook it in the rice cooker, it takes longer to cook. If anyone has
    mastered cooking brown rice in rice cooker please let me know the details. Thanks, Anna
     
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  2. BubbaBob

    BubbaBob Guest

    [email protected] (Annabellatthebal) wrote:

    > I usually cook white rice in a presto rice cooker, comes out very nice. I am trying to eat more
    > brown rice but not sure if I can cook it in the rice cooker, it takes longer to cook. If anyone
    > has mastered cooking brown rice in rice cooker please let me know the details. Thanks, Anna
    >

    Add about 1/3 more water.

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  3. Bob Dietz

    Bob Dietz Guest

    "BubbaBob" <[email protected]_remove_this_medlab5.unm.edu> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Annabellatthebal) wrote:
    >
    > > I usually cook white rice in a presto rice cooker, comes out very nice. I am trying to eat more
    > > brown rice but not sure if I can cook it in the rice cooker, it takes longer to cook. If anyone
    > > has mastered cooking brown rice in rice cooker please let me know the details. Thanks, Anna
    > >
    >
    > Add about 1/3 more water.
    >
    >
    A rice cooker doesn't work by time, it works by temperature. As long as there's still unabsorbed
    water, the temperature can't go over the boiing point. As soon as the water is absorbed, the
    temperature rises quickly and the cooker "knows" to shut off. This works for any kind of rice.

    The suggestion to add more water is probably good; it will automatically make the rice cook longer.

    Bob Dietz
     
  4. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    Bob Dietz wrote:
    >

    > A rice cooker doesn't work by time, it works by temperature. As long as there's still unabsorbed
    > water, the temperature can't go over the boiing point. As soon as the water is absorbed, the
    > temperature rises quickly and the cooker "knows" to shut off. This works for any kind of rice.
    >

    When I make brown rice in a rice cooker, I make it with the same amounts of water I would cooking it
    on the stove. Ditto with white rice. blacksalt
     
  5. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    kalanamak <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Bob Dietz wrote:
    >>
    >
    >> A rice cooker doesn't work by time, it works by temperature. As long as there's still unabsorbed
    >> water, the temperature can't go over the boiing point. As soon as the water is absorbed, the
    >> temperature rises quickly and the cooker "knows" to shut off. This works for any kind of rice.
    >>
    >
    > When I make brown rice in a rice cooker, I make it with the same amounts of water I would cooking
    > it on the stove. Ditto with white rice. blacksalt
    >

    So do I. Using the little bizzare measuring cup that came with the unit seemed wrong somehow
    (possibly too slow and confusing). Just don't cook wild rice in a rice cooker.

    I don't follow the standard for white basmati rice , which normally is 2 parts liquid to one part
    rice. I prefer a slightly firmer long grain rice so for every cup of basmati I use 2 cups of liquid
    (minus a Tbsp).

    What I like to do with my rice cooker is make one pot meals...chuck in 1 cup rice, some bite sized
    veggies, some chicken stock, perhaps 3 boneless skinless bite sized chicken thighs, seasoning and
    turn it on. About 17 minutes later supper. This works well with various meats, various veggies and
    various liquids. Kinda like a stir fry but boiled instead. If you are using veggies like snow peas,
    which don't need a lot of heat to be cooked, chuck them in at the end and stir them in. I use onion,
    mushrooms and carrot, season with lemon zest and minced garlic then chuck in a handful of frozen
    peas when the cooker switches from cooking to keep warm. I use mostly use redi-base chicken stock
    but I find coconut milk or cream of chicken soup (and some water) work well. I've been meaning to
    try some sherry in the chicken stock, but I keep forgetting when I actually make the one pot meal.

    --
    Once during Prohibition I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water.
    --------
    FIELDS, W. C.
     
  6. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 13:59:38 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:

    >kalanamak <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    <snip>
    >> When I make brown rice in a rice cooker, I make it with the same amounts of water I would cooking
    >> it on the stove. Ditto with white rice. blacksalt
    >
    >So do I. Using the little bizzare measuring cup that came with the unit seemed wrong somehow
    >(possibly too slow and confusing). Just don't cook wild rice in a rice cooker.
    >
    >I don't follow the standard for white basmati rice , which normally is 2 parts liquid to one part
    >rice. I prefer a slightly firmer long grain rice so for every cup of basmati I use 2 cups of liquid
    >(minus a Tbsp).

    I use about 1-3/4 c water for each cup of rice. I don't know if it's because my rice starts more
    humid to begin with or I just like it drier (freezes better that way anyway) but it seems like
    adding more water makes it too soft for my tastes.

    >What I like to do with my rice cooker is make one pot meals...chuck in 1 cup rice, some bite sized
    >veggies, some chicken stock, perhaps 3 boneless skinless bite sized chicken thighs, seasoning and
    >turn it on. About 17 minutes later supper. This works well with various meats, various veggies

    What a great idea! I'll have to give it a try, although I generally prefer brown rice and that would
    overcook most stuff.

    Thanks for the idea.

    Sue(tm) Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
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