Cooking for one

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Jan 23, 2005.

  1. I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    with good tips for cooking for one?
    I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.
     
    Tags:


  2. Steve Calvin

    Steve Calvin Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    > works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    > with good tips for cooking for one?
    > I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.
    >


    What advice have you been coming up with so that it's not repeated here?
    You mean the chili, taco, hh thangs?

    --
    Steve

    Ever wonder about those people who spend $2.00 apiece on those little
    bottles of Evian water? Try spelling Evian backwards...
     
  3. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger
    > helper. It works well, but I am ready for something
    > else.


    What about chicken, fish, soups, stews, salads... There's more to Real
    Life® than canned and boxed foods that require even less a minimum of
    effort! Pastas, for instance, lend themselves to smaller portions and
    multiple ingredients.

    Here's one such recipe:

    Sautéed Chicken with Penne Pasta

    INGREDIENTS:
    1 4-oz. skinless, boneless chicken breast
    1 tsp. butter, or OO
    salt, pepper to taste
    5 oz. penne pasta
    1 qt. water
    Optional:
    Chives
    Parsley
    Extra pat butter

    METHOD:
    In a 6" skillet, melt butter. Season chicken breast to taste. Lay into
    skillet when butter is melted and cook for 4 minutes per side. Set aside
    when done (off heat.) In a small pot, bring water to boil. Add penne
    pasta and cook for 10-13 minutes. Drain when done. Toss in a small
    amount of butter and parsley (or chives) and set chicken on top.

    You can vary this meal with fish, beef, or pork. It lends itself to
    vegetable medleys, too.

    The Ranger
     
  4. Kswck

    Kswck Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    > works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    > with good tips for cooking for one?
    > I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.
    >



    This may not be the complete answer, but Taste of Home has a new publication
    called Cooking for Two-just out.

    www.tasteofhome.com
     
  5. Louis Cohen

    Louis Cohen Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    > works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    > with good tips for cooking for one?
    > I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.
    >

    - Make some pasta sauces in advance - meat sauce, veggies, pesto and
    just cook up one portion of pasta when you get home, and reheat the
    sauce of choice.

    - roast a chicken and eat a couple of pieces each day

    - Brown some meat, poultry, or seafood in a pan. Remove, saute some
    garlic and onions, add some other veggies. Add wine/water/canned stock.
    Add the meat etc. pack to teh pan until it's fully cooked and the
    sauce is reduced.

    --

    ===============================================================
    Regards

    Louis Cohen

    "Yes, yes, I will desalinate you, you grande morue!"

    Émile Zola, Assommoir 1877
     
  6. wff_ng_6

    wff_ng_6 Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    > works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    > with good tips for cooking for one?
    > I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.


    I don't know of any good web sites, but I'll tell you some things that
    worked for me. First, don't approach it as cooking for one. Cook as of you
    are cooking for a small number of people, then have leftovers (and freeze
    some of them). What you want to do is learn techniques and ingredients from
    recipes and gain a sense of proportion. Once you have done that, you will
    know how to scale things and know what ingredients are appropriate to a
    dish. To quote from the foreword of a famous cookbook, "Mastering the Art of
    French Cooking": "Our primary purpose in this book is to teach you how to
    cook, so that you will understand the fundamental techniques and gradually
    be able to divorce yourself from a dependence on recipes."

    I've found that approach to be very helpful, whether you are cooking for one
    or for a number of people. So often a recipe will say use quantity X of a
    main ingredient. How nice if you could ever find it exactly in size X. Or
    that you have the right number of people to serve for quantity X. If you
    gain a sense of proportion, you can use quantity Y of the main ingredient
    and still produce a successful result. Same if a flavoring ingredient is
    specified that you don't have on hand, or can't get. If you learn what
    flavors are compatible, in what proportions, you should be able to adjust.

    The other day I came across a big knobby round ball at the supermarket
    called celery root. It's one of my favorite vegetables, though not widely
    used. The checkout clerks rarely have any idea what it is, so I have to tell
    them. I know I've seen recipes for it, but I basically just do my own thing.
    That day I happened to buy a bottle of cheap Australian red wine with a
    flavor packet attached to it. The packet said something about mixed grille,
    something with lamb. I opened the packet, smelled it, tasted it, and thought
    this just might work with the celery root. I sauted the celery root in
    butter, then added chicken stock like normal, but then sprinkled some of
    this spice mix on. It came out wonderful. I'm sure it would have been an
    absolute disaster though if I added the entire packet. Just making it up as
    I go along based on some basic principles makes cooking a lot more fun and
    can produce great results. I view recipes now more as "a point of departure"
    rather than a rigid prescription for cooking (note... you have to stay a lot
    closer to the recipe in baking!).
     
  7. There are lots of simple pasta toppings that can be done in the time
    the water takes to come to a boil: Canned Italian tomatoes are your
    friend for lots of pastas.

    tomato and fresh basil

    garlic and oil


    garlic, anchovies and oil


    chop an onion, dice a canned tomato or two, add a few pitted olives
    and some capers (rinse off the salt) and add some chopped garlic when
    almost done.

    All pastas can be modified with a hot pepper. You can grate a little
    cheese over most of them.


    Also very quick: steamed mussels or littlenecks.

    a fish fillet cooks very fast. Serve 5-minute cous cous and a green
    veg along with the fish.

    Leek and potato soup can be a base for a different extra ingredient
    each time you use it, so freezing a big batch doesn't mean eating the
    same thing every time. Freeze single portions in zipper bags.

    Try stuff. If you mess something up, nobody else has to know about it,
    and you have learned something.

    Craig Claiborne wrote a cook book for bachelors a long time ago that
    was practical. You might find it in a second-hand bookstore.

    I think it is easier if you use excellent ingredients. Do the absolute
    minimum to really good stuff rather than something complicated with
    the cheapest supermarket goods.

    HTH


    On 23 Jan 2005 11:03:33 -0800, "kilow[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    >works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    >with good tips for cooking for one?
    >I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.



    Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a


    "In this house we _obey_ the laws of thermodynamics." --Homer Simpson
     
  8. There are lots of simple pasta toppings that can be done in the time
    the water takes to come to a boil: Canned Italian tomatoes are your
    friend for lots of pastas.

    tomato and fresh basil

    garlic and oil


    garlic, anchovies and oil


    chop an onion, dice a canned tomato or two, add a few pitted olives
    and some capers (rinse off the salt) and add some chopped garlic when
    almost done.

    All pastas can be modified with a hot pepper. You can grate a little
    cheese over most of them.


    Also very quick: steamed mussels or littlenecks.

    a fish fillet cooks very fast. Serve 5-minute cous cous and a green
    veg along with the fish.

    Leek and potato soup can be a base for a different extra ingredient
    each time you use it, so freezing a big batch doesn't mean eating the
    same thing every time. Freeze single portions in zipper bags.

    Try stuff. If you mess something up, nobody else has to know about it,
    and you have learned something.

    Craig Claiborne wrote a cook book for bachelors a long time ago that
    was practical. You might find it in a second-hand bookstore.

    I think it is easier if you use excellent ingredients. Do the absolute
    minimum to really good stuff rather than something complicated with
    the cheapest supermarket goods.

    HTH


    On 23 Jan 2005 11:03:33 -0800, "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    >works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    >with good tips for cooking for one?
    >I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.



    Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a


    "In this house we _obey_ the laws of thermodynamics." --Homer Simpson
     
  9. On Sun, 23 Jan 2005 12:20:28 -0800, Louis Cohen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >===============================================================
    >Regards
    >
    >Louis Cohen
    >
    >"Yes, yes, I will desalinate you, you grande morue!"
    >
    >Émile Zola, Assommoir 1877


    I love your sig line. I don't think Zola is responsible for the
    translation. I imagine a river boat in the Gironde towing a slab of
    bacalao so they can make brandade when they get to Bordeaux.



    Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a


    "In this house we _obey_ the laws of thermodynamics." --Homer Simpson
     
  10. On Sun, 23 Jan 2005 12:20:28 -0800, Louis Cohen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >===============================================================
    >Regards
    >
    >Louis Cohen
    >
    >"Yes, yes, I will desalinate you, you grande morue!"
    >
    >Émile Zola, Assommoir 1877


    I love your sig line. I don't think Zola is responsible for the
    translation. I imagine a river boat in the Gironde towing a slab of
    bacalao so they can make brandade when they get to Bordeaux.



    Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a


    "In this house we _obey_ the laws of thermodynamics." --Homer Simpson
     
  11. Michael Odom

    Michael Odom Guest

    On Sun, 23 Jan 2005 15:11:34 -0500, "Kswck" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >>I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    >> works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    >> with good tips for cooking for one?
    >> I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.
    >>

    >
    >
    >This may not be the complete answer, but Taste of Home has a new publication
    >called Cooking for Two-just out.
    >
    >www.tasteofhome.com
    >

    But that's twice the advice!

    D's doing the South Beach diet, so I don't get to eat rice that often.
    Ergo, when she's away it's jambalaya etouffee for one for me. If the
    OP is interested, he/she might try looking into something like the
    gumbopages recipe archive for recipes to make and freeze.

    D doesn't care much for lamb either. Last time she went off to a
    conference, I made lamb chops for one.

    Lamb chops for one (as I recall)

    3 or 4 thick lamb rib chops.
    1/4 cup reduced stock (lamb is best, but beef or veal will do)
    1 shot glass (or so) Bourbon
    2 Tblsp soy sauce
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    Zest of 1/2 lemon
    1 Tbsp unsalted butter
    1 medium shallot, chopped
    1 Tblsp brown sugar
    1 tsp pepared Dijon mustard
    1 tsp dried mint
    1/2 tsp black pepper
    1/2 serrano chile.

    Buz the soy sauce, the chile, the sugar, the lemon juce, the mint the
    black pepper, and the mustard to a slurry and marinate the chops for
    an hour or more.

    Remove them from the marinade, pat dry, and sear in a hot stainless
    skillet with a little oil. When they are browned on both sides, check
    the internal temp for desired level of doneness. I like them about
    125 or so for medium rare. Set them in a warm oven.

    Swet the shallots in the oil till they're translucent and then add the
    stock, about 2/3 or so of the remaining marinade, and the whiskey.
    Watch out for flare ups with the alcohol! Bring it all to a boil and
    reduce it by a little over half. Remove it from heat and whisk in the
    butter to incorporate. Add the lemon zest. Return the chops to the
    pan and turn them to coat with the sauce.

    Serve with oven fries or rice to sop up the juice. Gaze at a photo of
    the vegetable of your choice.

    Well, it was something like that, anyway.

    modom

    "Dallas is a rich man with a death wish in his eyes."
    -- Jimmie Dale Gilmore
     
  12. Michael Odom

    Michael Odom Guest

    On Sun, 23 Jan 2005 15:11:34 -0500, "Kswck" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >>I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    >> works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    >> with good tips for cooking for one?
    >> I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.
    >>

    >
    >
    >This may not be the complete answer, but Taste of Home has a new publication
    >called Cooking for Two-just out.
    >
    >www.tasteofhome.com
    >

    But that's twice the advice!

    D's doing the South Beach diet, so I don't get to eat rice that often.
    Ergo, when she's away it's jambalaya etouffee for one for me. If the
    OP is interested, he/she might try looking into something like the
    gumbopages recipe archive for recipes to make and freeze.

    D doesn't care much for lamb either. Last time she went off to a
    conference, I made lamb chops for one.

    Lamb chops for one (as I recall)

    3 or 4 thick lamb rib chops.
    1/4 cup reduced stock (lamb is best, but beef or veal will do)
    1 shot glass (or so) Bourbon
    2 Tblsp soy sauce
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    Zest of 1/2 lemon
    1 Tbsp unsalted butter
    1 medium shallot, chopped
    1 Tblsp brown sugar
    1 tsp pepared Dijon mustard
    1 tsp dried mint
    1/2 tsp black pepper
    1/2 serrano chile.

    Buz the soy sauce, the chile, the sugar, the lemon juce, the mint the
    black pepper, and the mustard to a slurry and marinate the chops for
    an hour or more.

    Remove them from the marinade, pat dry, and sear in a hot stainless
    skillet with a little oil. When they are browned on both sides, check
    the internal temp for desired level of doneness. I like them about
    125 or so for medium rare. Set them in a warm oven.

    Swet the shallots in the oil till they're translucent and then add the
    stock, about 2/3 or so of the remaining marinade, and the whiskey.
    Watch out for flare ups with the alcohol! Bring it all to a boil and
    reduce it by a little over half. Remove it from heat and whisk in the
    butter to incorporate. Add the lemon zest. Return the chops to the
    pan and turn them to coat with the sauce.

    Serve with oven fries or rice to sop up the juice. Gaze at a photo of
    the vegetable of your choice.

    Well, it was something like that, anyway.

    modom

    "Dallas is a rich man with a death wish in his eyes."
    -- Jimmie Dale Gilmore
     
  13. "[email protected]" wrote:

    > I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    > works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    > with good tips for cooking for one?
    > I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.



    ONE "GRILLED" CHEESE SANDWICH in a big hurry:

    Olive oil (extra virgin, of course)
    Bread
    Cheese
    Tomato

    1. Toast the bread.
    2. Brush olive oil onto one side of each piece of toast and turn them
    over, olive oil side down.
    3. Put a slice of cheese on each (include tomato slice if desired).
    4. Slide the plate into a microwave (oil side down, cheese side up) and
    zap for 15 seconds, or until the cheese JUST STARTS to melt.
    5. Remove from microwave and put cheese sides together.

    There's your sandwich. If you included a tomato slice, use the rest of
    the tomato for a little salad.

    What do you think of that?
     
  14. "[email protected]" wrote:

    > I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    > works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    > with good tips for cooking for one?
    > I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.



    ONE "GRILLED" CHEESE SANDWICH in a big hurry:

    Olive oil (extra virgin, of course)
    Bread
    Cheese
    Tomato

    1. Toast the bread.
    2. Brush olive oil onto one side of each piece of toast and turn them
    over, olive oil side down.
    3. Put a slice of cheese on each (include tomato slice if desired).
    4. Slide the plate into a microwave (oil side down, cheese side up) and
    zap for 15 seconds, or until the cheese JUST STARTS to melt.
    5. Remove from microwave and put cheese sides together.

    There's your sandwich. If you included a tomato slice, use the rest of
    the tomato for a little salad.

    What do you think of that?
     
  15. Those are good. I like to use grated cheese though. I have never
    found a slice of cheese I like. It takes all of 5 seconds to grate
    cheese on the bread and melt it in the microwave for 10-15 more seconds.
     
  16. Those are good. I like to use grated cheese though. I have never
    found a slice of cheese I like. It takes all of 5 seconds to grate
    cheese on the bread and melt it in the microwave for 10-15 more seconds.
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>,
    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I am tired of freezing chili, taco meat, and hamburger helper. It
    > works well, but I am ready for something else. Anyone know of a site
    > with good tips for cooking for one?
    > I have looked but keep coming up with the same advice.
    >


    What advice are you getting? It's pretty easy to prepare a single pork
    chop, fish fillet, piece of chicken, or piece of grillable meat. And
    easy to bake or boil one potato and/or one serving of a vegetable, fresh
    or frozen. Rice for one is easy. What do you like to eat? If you
    have to cook a larger cut of meat to do it justice, invite a friend for
    the meal and send some of the leftovers home with your guest. What's
    the problem here? Go to the library and check out the cookbook section
    (641 last I remember)
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> 2005 Pirohy Marathon pics added 1-23-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
  18. The problem with fixing one portion is that meats ,and I am a big beef
    eater, don't last long without freezing. To cook for one I would
    have to either freeze the meat or go grocery shopping every 3 days or
    so.

    I have tried both, and to me it is just as easy to fix for 4 and freeze
    the left over as it is to thaw out a meal for 1.

    I just wish I had more ideas on what to fix. Another problem I have is
    beef is about the only thing I like. Chicken breast is good but I
    can't eat it if I have to prepare it. Pasta is not a bad idea but
    without beef it is not something I like either.
     
  19. Emil

    Emil Guest

    Tilla Food saver.
    It allows you to make portions and store them 10 times longer then any other
    storage bags or boxes.

    Look at frozen dinners and duplicate for yourself. Go to a bulk store such
    as Sams or Costco get foam plates to make these custom dinners and place in
    a food saver bag and remove the air.


    --
    Emil Luca

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > The problem with fixing one portion is that meats ,and I am a big beef
    > eater, don't last long without freezing. To cook for one I would
    > have to either freeze the meat or go grocery shopping every 3 days or
    > so.
    >
    > I have tried both, and to me it is just as easy to fix for 4 and freeze
    > the left over as it is to thaw out a meal for 1.
    >
    > I just wish I had more ideas on what to fix. Another problem I have is
    > beef is about the only thing I like. Chicken breast is good but I
    > can't eat it if I have to prepare it. Pasta is not a bad idea but
    > without beef it is not something I like either.
    >
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>,
    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The problem with fixing one portion is that meats ,and I am a big beef
    > eater, don't last long without freezing. To cook for one I would
    > have to either freeze the meat or go grocery shopping every 3 days or
    > so.


    There are worse things, unless you live 20 miles from a supermarket.
    >
    > I have tried both, and to me it is just as easy to fix for 4 and freeze
    > the left over as it is to thaw out a meal for 1.


    Certainly.

    > I just wish I had more ideas on what to fix. Another problem I have is
    > beef is about the only thing I like. Chicken breast is good but I
    > can't eat it if I have to prepare it. Pasta is not a bad idea but
    > without beef it is not something I like either.


    All right -- quit being lazy! In your OP you said you kept getting
    the same advice from the various sites you've looked at. Let me repeat
    my question from my first reply: What advice have you been getting?

    Do you have any cookbooks? Go to the library -- they've got tons. ( I
    see that I mentioned that in my first reply, too.)

    Why can't you eat chicken breast if you have to prepare it? Are you one
    of those folks who won't touch raw chicken? Betty Crocker has a new
    cookbook based on deli rotisserie chickens.

    You like beef - have you checked the National Cattlemen's Beef
    Association? <www.beef.org> Go to their kitchen section for their
    recipe database -- they have a boatload of beefy recipes.

    I'm doing my best here.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> 2005 Pirohy Marathon pics added 1-23-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
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