Cooking sweet potato: how?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by FERRANTE, Feb 20, 2005.

  1. FERRANTE

    FERRANTE Guest

    I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?

    Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    invite)?

    Thanks,
    Mark
     
    Tags:


  2. Robyn

    Robyn Guest

    My favorite way to prepare sweet potatos:

    Peel your sweet potato & then cut it into thick slices.

    Coat in olive oil or melted butter and put it in a 375 degree oven on a
    cookie sheet until the pieces are soft and carmelized.

    Put the slices in a bowl & add a little more butter, some cinnamon,
    some nutmeg & a little salt. If you want to add a little more
    sweetness, some maple syrup is also good.

    Smush it a little with a fork and call it done.

    Robyn
     
  3. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    > of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    > simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    >
    > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    > invite)?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mark


    Peel and slice 1" thick. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with salt,
    pepper, anda something else if desired such as paprika, ground cumin, or
    curry powder. Bake at 375 until done - 15-20 min perhaps.


    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  4. Kerry

    Kerry Guest

    FERRANTE <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other
    > ways of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is
    > the simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for
    > how long?
    >
    > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a
    > Gmail invite)?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mark


    French Fried Sweet Potato is great...K

    --
    Kerry in Langley
     
  5. Try this:


    "FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I love candied sweet [email protected]@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format


    Sweet Potato Soup


    2 tablespoon unsalted butter
    1 medium onion; coarsly cut
    2 clove garlic
    3 medium sweet potato; peeled, quartered
    4 cup chicken stock
    1/2 cup honey
    1/2 cup creme fraiche
    2 tablespoon chipotle chilli; pureed
    1 salt and pepper

    Melt butter and sweat the garlic and onion until translucent. Raise heat to
    high and add the sweetpotatoes and stock and bring to the boil. Lower heat
    then simmer for about 30 minutes.
    Remove from the heat and add the honey, cream, chipotles and salt and
    pepper. Puree the mixture.
    Serve garnished with blue corn tortilla chips and/or chopped coriander.

    Contributor: Bobby Flay's Bold American Food.

    NYC Nutrilink: N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000
    NYC Nutrilink: N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000
    NYC Nutrilink: N0^00000

    ** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.66 **

    tatos and friends say I should try other ways
    > of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    > simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    >
    > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    > invite)?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mark
     
  6. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    FERRANTE wrote:
    > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    > of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    > simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    >
    > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    > invite)?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mark


    I bake them just like I would a regular baked potato. Rub with a little
    oil, sprinkle with salt, prick with a fork, bake @ 375F for an hour. They
    are very moist inside so they don't need much butter at all. You can also
    boil and mash them.

    Jill
     
  7. BOB

    BOB Guest

    FERRANTE wrote:
    > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try
    > other ways of eating them. I bought one sweet potato
    > yesterday. What is the simplest and best way to prepare
    > it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    >
    > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't
    > say a Gmail invite)?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mark


    Baked...similar to a baked white potato.
    Fried...similar to a regular fried potato, either cut into "fries" or cut
    into circles, then deep or pan fried.
    Grilled over your charcoal fire, cut into round slices, dipped in olive
    oil, then grilled 'til done.
    Sliced thin and eaten raw.

    BOB
     
  8. George

    George Guest

    FERRANTE wrote:
    > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    > of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    > simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    >
    > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    > invite)?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mark


    Roast it, simply wash it and put it on the oven rack (we put a small
    piece of Al foil on the oven floor underneath in case there are some
    sugar drips). 350 for more than an hour depending on size. It will be
    much softer to the touch than a regular potato when done. The natural
    sugars will caramelize into a nice layer on the bottom. Remove, peel,
    eat. The roasting brings out great tasting natural flavors.
     
  9. Phred

    Phred Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, FERRANTE <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    >of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    >simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    >
    >Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    >invite)?


    My early experience with sweetbucks was with the somewhat "wild type"
    which is slightly greenish inside when cooked and contains some weak
    "strings". These were *delicious* when cooked by my grandmother in
    her old wood-fired oven decades ago.

    She simply chucked them in with the chook when cooking that special
    Sunday dinner (actually at lunch time, at about 30C and 85%RH :).
    They went in with the spuds -- or in lieu of the spuds -- and onion
    and pumpkin. (Sometimes taro too.)

    Apart from the onion, the veggies all came out with that scrumptious
    crisp outer "shell" and lovely and moist inside. The onions came out
    with a sort of caramelised skin.

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID
     
  10. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    FERRANTE <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    >of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    >simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    >
    >Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    >invite)?
    >
    >Thanks,
    >Mark

    Baked is the only way to go in my opinion and the simpler the better.
    Brings back memories of my grandmother who lived alone and kept a HUGE
    garden well into her ninties. My favorite treat - she would pull
    young sweet taters when they looked like large human fingers, bake
    them till the skin was crunchy and serve them with melted butter for
    dipping. You can't even image how good they were.
     
  11. FERRANTE wrote:
    >
    > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    > of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    > simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    >
    > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    > invite)?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mark


    THE simplest way?

    Scrub off dirt with a brush and water.
    Pierce about 10 times with the point of a knife.
    Wrap loosely in a paper towel.
    Put in microwave. Use potato setting or give it about 3-4 minutes.
    Check that it does not get overdone by stabbing with a fork.

    You can then eat it any way you want. Well cooked potato will be sweet.
    We mash with butter and (sometimes) a little maple syrup.

    LB
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:

    > FERRANTE wrote:
    > >
    > > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    > > of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    > > simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    > >
    > > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    > > invite)?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Mark

    >
    > THE simplest way?
    >
    > Scrub off dirt with a brush and water.
    > Pierce about 10 times with the point of a knife.
    > Wrap loosely in a paper towel.
    > Put in microwave. Use potato setting or give it about 3-4 minutes.
    > Check that it does not get overdone by stabbing with a fork.
    >
    > You can then eat it any way you want. Well cooked potato will be sweet.
    > We mash with butter and (sometimes) a little maple syrup.


    If you microwave sweet potatoes, they fail to develop a lot of the
    wonderful sweet flavor that they can deliver. It's not enough just to
    get them hot. Microwaving simply does not take enough time to do the job
    properly.

    Bake them -- longer than you would a white potato -- and then split and
    add butter.

    Bake more than you will eat. Let the rest cool. Next day (or soon),
    peel, slice about 1/4 inch thick, and saute in butter, slowly, to let
    the sugar caramelize, until nicely brown on both sides. Yum. Marvelous
    as a side dish to a pork roast.

    Isaac
     
  13. On Mon 21 Feb 2005 09:21:11p, Isaac Wingfield wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> FERRANTE wrote:
    >> >
    >> > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    >> > of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    >> > simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    >> >
    >> > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    >> > invite)?
    >> >
    >> > Thanks,
    >> > Mark

    >>
    >> THE simplest way?
    >>
    >> Scrub off dirt with a brush and water.
    >> Pierce about 10 times with the point of a knife.
    >> Wrap loosely in a paper towel.
    >> Put in microwave. Use potato setting or give it about 3-4 minutes.
    >> Check that it does not get overdone by stabbing with a fork.
    >>
    >> You can then eat it any way you want. Well cooked potato will be sweet.
    >> We mash with butter and (sometimes) a little maple syrup.

    >
    > If you microwave sweet potatoes, they fail to develop a lot of the
    > wonderful sweet flavor that they can deliver. It's not enough just to
    > get them hot. Microwaving simply does not take enough time to do the job
    > properly.
    >
    > Bake them -- longer than you would a white potato -- and then split and
    > add butter.
    >
    > Bake more than you will eat. Let the rest cool. Next day (or soon),
    > peel, slice about 1/4 inch thick, and saute in butter, slowly, to let
    > the sugar caramelize, until nicely brown on both sides. Yum. Marvelous
    > as a side dish to a pork roast.
    >
    > Isaac
    >


    Now that's the way to cook a sweet potato!

    Wayne
     
  14. Since they take so long to cook, I microwave them for a few minutes and
    then bake them as this reduces the baking time. They develop that
    great mushy carmelized taste. Split open and add butter and brown
    sugar. Can also add cinnamon and or maple syrup.
     
  15. Peter Aitken wrote:

    > Peel and slice 1" thick. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with

    salt,
    > pepper, anda something else if desired such as paprika, ground cumin,

    or
    > curry powder. Bake at 375 until done - 15-20 min perhaps.
    >


    I slice them a little thinner than this, salt 'em and bake. When
    they're done, I hit them with some powdered chipotle pepper.

    Not much like candied sweet potatoes (which I hate), but quite
    good.

    Cindy Hamilton
     
  16. Isaac Wingfield wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > FERRANTE wrote:
    > > >
    > > > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    > > > of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    > > > simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    > > >
    > > > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    > > > invite)?
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > > Mark

    > >
    > > THE simplest way?
    > >
    > > Scrub off dirt with a brush and water.
    > > Pierce about 10 times with the point of a knife.
    > > Wrap loosely in a paper towel.
    > > Put in microwave. Use potato setting or give it about 3-4 minutes.
    > > Check that it does not get overdone by stabbing with a fork.
    > >
    > > You can then eat it any way you want. Well cooked potato will be sweet.
    > > We mash with butter and (sometimes) a little maple syrup.

    >
    > If you microwave sweet potatoes, they fail to develop a lot of the
    > wonderful sweet flavor that they can deliver. It's not enough just to
    > get them hot. Microwaving simply does not take enough time to do the job
    > properly.
    >
    > Bake them -- longer than you would a white potato -- and then split and
    > add butter.
    >
    > Bake more than you will eat. Let the rest cool. Next day (or soon),
    > peel, slice about 1/4 inch thick, and saute in butter, slowly, to let
    > the sugar caramelize, until nicely brown on both sides. Yum. Marvelous
    > as a side dish to a pork roast.
    >
    > Isaac


    Have you ever actually tried it?
    They taste plenty sweet to us AND the OP asked for the simplest way to
    cook them. I answered that part of the post.
    For those a little weak in math 5 minutes is about 1/10th of 50 minutes.

    LB
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>, FERRANTE
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    > of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    > simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    >
    > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    > invite)?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mark


    Mark, I just baked one last week along with a pork roast. Scrubbed,
    pricked, and baked for about an hour and something, I think, at 325. I
    halved it lengthwise and ate it like a regular baked spud -- no sour
    cream, but I just scooped the flesh from the shell. It didn't need any
    sweetening, but I've been known to add a little brown sugar and butter
    to te peeled and boiled sweet that's been cooked stovetop. Texas
    Roadhouse Grill (?) restaurant chain serves them with cinnamon in the
    brown sugar. Could be worse.
    --
    -Barb
    <www.jamlady.eboard.com>; Sam pics added 2-7-05
    "I got the motive, which is money; and the body, which is dead!" - Rod
    Steiger as Sheriff Gillespie, "In the Heat of the Night," 1967.
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:

    > Isaac Wingfield wrote:
    > >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > > > FERRANTE wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    > > > > of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    > > > > simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    > > > >
    > > > > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    > > > > invite)?
    > > > >
    > > > > Thanks,
    > > > > Mark
    > > >
    > > > THE simplest way?
    > > >
    > > > Scrub off dirt with a brush and water.
    > > > Pierce about 10 times with the point of a knife.
    > > > Wrap loosely in a paper towel.
    > > > Put in microwave. Use potato setting or give it about 3-4 minutes.
    > > > Check that it does not get overdone by stabbing with a fork.
    > > >
    > > > You can then eat it any way you want. Well cooked potato will be sweet.
    > > > We mash with butter and (sometimes) a little maple syrup.

    > >
    > > If you microwave sweet potatoes, they fail to develop a lot of the
    > > wonderful sweet flavor that they can deliver. It's not enough just to
    > > get them hot. Microwaving simply does not take enough time to do the job
    > > properly.
    > >
    > > Bake them -- longer than you would a white potato -- and then split and
    > > add butter.
    > >
    > > Bake more than you will eat. Let the rest cool. Next day (or soon),
    > > peel, slice about 1/4 inch thick, and saute in butter, slowly, to let
    > > the sugar caramelize, until nicely brown on both sides. Yum. Marvelous
    > > as a side dish to a pork roast.
    > >
    > > Isaac

    >
    > Have you ever actually tried it?


    Yup. Exactly once. Never again.

    Isaac
     
  19. On Tue 22 Feb 2005 09:40:31p, Isaac Wingfield wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> Isaac Wingfield wrote:
    >> >
    >> > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
    >> >
    >> > > FERRANTE wrote:
    >> > > >
    >> > > > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other
    >> > > > ways of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is
    >> > > > the simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for
    >> > > > how long?
    >> > > >
    >> > > > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a
    >> > > > Gmail invite)?
    >> > > >
    >> > > > Thanks,
    >> > > > Mark
    >> > >
    >> > > THE simplest way?
    >> > >
    >> > > Scrub off dirt with a brush and water.
    >> > > Pierce about 10 times with the point of a knife.
    >> > > Wrap loosely in a paper towel.
    >> > > Put in microwave. Use potato setting or give it about 3-4 minutes.
    >> > > Check that it does not get overdone by stabbing with a fork.
    >> > >
    >> > > You can then eat it any way you want. Well cooked potato will be
    >> > > sweet. We mash with butter and (sometimes) a little maple syrup.
    >> >
    >> > If you microwave sweet potatoes, they fail to develop a lot of the
    >> > wonderful sweet flavor that they can deliver. It's not enough just to
    >> > get them hot. Microwaving simply does not take enough time to do the
    >> > job properly.
    >> >
    >> > Bake them -- longer than you would a white potato -- and then split
    >> > and add butter.
    >> >
    >> > Bake more than you will eat. Let the rest cool. Next day (or soon),
    >> > peel, slice about 1/4 inch thick, and saute in butter, slowly, to let
    >> > the sugar caramelize, until nicely brown on both sides. Yum.
    >> > Marvelous as a side dish to a pork roast.
    >> >
    >> > Isaac

    >>
    >> Have you ever actually tried it?

    >
    > Yup. Exactly once. Never again.
    >
    > Isaac


    Never again what? Microwaving the sweet potato? I wholeheartedly agree.

    I learned from my mother to bake them in a slow ~325°F oven for between 1-
    1/2 to 2 hours. Perfect caramelization of the sugars under the skin. When
    she was a child growing up in the country, her mother baked them even
    slower and longer on an open hearth.

    Mom would also prepare them as you suggested, sliced and slowly sauteed in
    butter or even bacon fat. Usually she would dust the slices very lightly
    with granulated sugar. One could make a meal on that melt-in-your-mouth
    goodness. We sometimes had them for breakfast with slices of fried country
    ham, eggs, and biscuits.

    Wayne
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>, FERRANTE
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I love candied sweet potatos and friends say I should try other ways
    > of eating them. I bought one sweet potato yesterday. What is the
    > simplest and best way to prepare it? Bake? What temp and for how long?
    >
    > Should Iadd anthing other than butter (and please don't say a Gmail
    > invite)?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mark


    I cooked one tonight -- peeled, sliced it into 1" thick circles and
    boiled it. Boiled the water totally out of the pan; bottom of the pan
    is coated black but the sweets were miraculously salvageable. The
    stuck-to-the-pan parts merely lookly*lightly* caramelized. I didn't
    serve them with supper but ate about half of them cold from the dish I
    transferred them to. Plain. Not buttah, no sugar, no nuthin'. Mighty
    tasty.

    I've got the bottom of the pan covered with baking soda and will rinse
    it clean in the morning.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Sam pics added 2-7-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
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