cooking wheatgerm loses nutritional value?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Tim_Mac, Feb 12, 2006.

  1. Tim_Mac

    Tim_Mac Guest

    hi,
    i've been experimenting with some home-made toasted oat cereal. to
    make it more healthy i add wheatgerm and bran. someone said on a web
    site that if you cook wheatgerm it loses its nutritional value. is
    this true? what about bran? the cereal is baked in the oven in a
    honey + oil mix @ 180 c.

    i find it hard to believe that nutrients could disappear with heat...
    but you never know.

    thanks in advance for any tips
    tim
     
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  2. uz051235198

    uz051235198 Guest

    "Tim_Mac" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > hi,
    > i've been experimenting with some home-made toasted oat cereal. to
    > make it more healthy i add wheatgerm and bran. someone said on a web
    > site that if you cook wheatgerm it loses its nutritional value. is
    > this true? what about bran? the cereal is baked in the oven in a
    > honey + oil mix @ 180 c.
    >
    > i find it hard to believe that nutrients could disappear with heat...
    > but you never know.


    It is my understanding that this only happens when cooking in water,
    as the nutrients leach out in the water. I would not expect it to happen
    with baking or roasting, but I may be wrong.

    Incidentally, collard greens are one of the few foods whose nutrient
    value increases when boiled. :) No kidding, cooking makes some of
    the nutrients available to us that are not available raw. Strangely, the
    fiber content quintuples when the collards are cooked.

    http://www.vegparadise.com/highestperch55.html


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  3. uz051235198 wrote:
    > It is my understanding that this only happens when cooking in water,
    > as the nutrients leach out in the water. I would not expect it to happen
    > with baking or roasting, but I may be wrong.
    >
    > Incidentally, collard greens are one of the few foods whose nutrient
    > value increases when boiled. :) No kidding, cooking makes some of
    > the nutrients available to us that are not available raw. Strangely, the
    > fiber content quintuples when the collards are cooked.
    >
    > http://www.vegparadise.com/highestperch55.html


    That's silly. Fiber is a physical product that does not undergo much
    change. Someone is either not reading correctly or not dividing
    properly.

    Let see the latest release I have from the USDA lists 100 grams of
    collards, boiled, drained, without salt, as 2.8 grams of dietary fiber.

    And raw is 3.6 grams of dietary fiber for 100 grams. So really 0.8
    grams difference. That's not five times but more like the reciprocal,
    1/5th more. I gather someone did not divide properly.

    I suggest using the USDA. They actually do real experiments. And those
    in water loss have also been done. I was surprised how little was lost
    in general. Very, very surprised. About the water, don't remember now.
    The brain is elsewhere at the moment. In any case, drink the water if
    concerned. But I would try to find an actual scientific article. This
    web stuff is very inaccurate and gets quoted over and over.

    USDA = United States Department of Agriculture
    100 grams = 22% of a pound, almost a quarter of one pound weight.
     
  4. Tim_Mac

    Tim_Mac Guest

    hi uz,
    thanks for the reply. i would be of the same opinion.
    cheers
    tim
     
  5. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > uz051235198 wrote:
    > > It is my understanding that this only happens when cooking in water,
    > > as the nutrients leach out in the water. I would not expect it to happen
    > > with baking or roasting, but I may be wrong.
    > >
    > > Incidentally, collard greens are one of the few foods whose nutrient
    > > value increases when boiled. :) No kidding, cooking makes some of
    > > the nutrients available to us that are not available raw. Strangely, the
    > > fiber content quintuples when the collards are cooked.
    > >
    > > http://www.vegparadise.com/highestperch55.html

    >
    > That's silly. Fiber is a physical product that does not undergo much
    > change. Someone is either not reading correctly or not dividing
    > properly.
    >
    > Let see the latest release I have from the USDA lists 100 grams of
    > collards, boiled, drained, without salt, as 2.8 grams of dietary fiber.
    >
    > And raw is 3.6 grams of dietary fiber for 100 grams. So really 0.8
    > grams difference. That's not five times but more like the reciprocal,
    > 1/5th more. I gather someone did not divide properly.
    >
    > I suggest using the USDA. They actually do real experiments. And those
    > in water loss have also been done. I was surprised how little was lost
    > in general. Very, very surprised. About the water, don't remember now.
    > The brain is elsewhere at the moment. In any case, drink the water if
    > concerned. But I would try to find an actual scientific article. This
    > web stuff is very inaccurate and gets quoted over and over.
    >
    > USDA = United States Department of Agriculture
    > 100 grams = 22% of a pound, almost a quarter of one pound weight.


    You need to consider *total* nutritional value. All vegetables lose
    nutritional value when cooked, aside from fiber decomposition (heat
    destroys vitamins). But in many cases cooking makes whatever
    nutritional components remain to be more available for absorbtion when
    ingested (especially minerals). So yes, with tough fiborous vegetbles
    like collards cooking will enhance nutrition to some degree, but only
    if the cooking liquid is consumed... and in fact with how some cook
    collards to death unless they consume the cooking liquid then they may
    as well not bother... eating drained collard is kinda like reusing
    teabags.

    Sheldon
     
  6. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Tim_Mac wrote:
    >
    > i find it hard to believe that nutrients could disappear with heat...
    > but you never know.


    Vitamins are destroyed by exposure to heat, light, humidity, air...
    well read:

    http://www.jamiesonvitamins.com/qa.asp?cat_id=2

    Sheldon
     
  7. Sheldon wrote:
    > Tim_Mac wrote:
    > >
    > > i find it hard to believe that nutrients could disappear with heat...
    > > but you never know.

    >
    > Vitamins are destroyed by exposure to heat, light, humidity, air...
    > well read:
    >
    > http://www.jamiesonvitamins.com/qa.asp?cat_id=2
    >
    > Sheldon


    Not really, at least the vitamins examined individually by the USDA.

    I think the worst was around 50%.

    And even relatively fragile vitamins like C or E did quite well in
    cooking tests.

    If I find the URL which lists all the vitamins tested in cooking by the
    USDA, it will be interesting reading because what these web sites post
    is not true. It's just marketing and advertising for their selfish
    purposes of selling more vitamins! Ask them for a reference and then
    see what they sputter about. An awful lot of vitamins are not
    destroyed. There may be unknown nutrients destroyed by cooking but the
    ones we know about are not destroyed to any great degree. As I recall,
    luteins are enhanced by cooking and that can prevent the most common
    form of blindness.
     
  8. Sheldon wrote:

    >Tim_Mac wrote:
    >
    >
    >>i find it hard to believe that nutrients could disappear with heat...
    >>but you never know.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Vitamins are destroyed by exposure to heat, light, humidity, air...
    >well read:
    >
    >http://www.jamiesonvitamins.com/qa.asp?cat_id=2
    >
    >Sheldon
    >
    >
    >

    When I was a uni student, back in ancient times, I remember that people
    who lived in what were called the halls of residence (this was Monash,
    we didn't have colleges like the gentry at Melbourne) were advised, if
    not commanded, to take a piece of fruit from the baskets put out at
    breakfast. Dinners were plated up in advance and left to steam in hot
    boxes, and apparently this was leading to vitamin deficiencies. We will
    say nothing about flavour or texture.

    Christine
    Who lived at home
     
  9. Old Mother Ashby wrote:
    > Apparently people were presenting at student health exhibiting worrying
    > symptoms. Don't ask me what they were. It's one of those stories, like
    > the saboteur getting into the computer room and jumbling the minitran
    > cards, that could have been part myth even at the time. At a distance of
    > about 35 years, who knows. It's just possible that it's a recovered
    > memory and it never happened at all.
    >
    > You know that the Royal Navy also used sauerkaut to combat scurvy. The
    > crew on one of Captain James Cook's ships wouldn't touch the stuff, so
    > rather than flogging them into submission he announced that it was only
    > for officers and they were served it daily. Didn't take long before the
    > crew were demanding it too. Now that's headology for you!
    >
    > Christine


    Most, and I repeat, most recovered memories actually did happen, just
    not quite as remembered. For example, the date or time was wrong. In
    one study, using hospital records for assault, it was found the
    recovered memories were accurate that something happened, it's just
    that the details were off but they were corroborated by the hospital
    records. But in a court of law, this is a prescription generally for
    disaster when someone gets the time and date wrong. Just thought I
    would add that to the discussion of vitamin C!

    And I got the word misspelled, it's antiscorbutic.

    My guess is that scurvy did occur, as a matter of fact. Probably
    bleeding gums, easy to see and diagnose, even for college quacks.
    Vitamin C is water soluble and more fragile than the other vitamins and
    heat sensitive = spending the day in a steam table would probably
    destroy it. In any event, forcing the students to eat an orange would
    cure scurvy and obvious bleeding gums.
     
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