Cooking with Psyllium

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Feb 12, 2006.

  1. Is it ok to prepare food with small amounts of psyllium? For example, a
    serving of pasta sauce with a half teaspoon or so mixed in?

    I tried some Ronzoni whole wheat noodles the other day. The texture
    wasn't quite to my liking and it's pricier than regular pasta. Instead,
    I thought the fiber could be mixed in with the sauce. Of course, I know
    it's better to mix vegetables to bulk up the sauce, but would cooking
    with psyllium also work?

    Cooking with psyllium seems no different than cooking with bran and
    I've read that psyllium has fewer side effects like excess gas. I don't
    think bran would mix as well with tomato sauce.
     
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  2. montygram

    montygram Guest

    You do not need "fiber," which is anti-nutritive, unless you are eating
    food that you should not be, such as oxidized cholesterol, damaged
    proteins, and more than very small amounts of unsaturated fatty acids.
     
  3. TC

    TC Guest

    Absolute YUUUUKKKKK.

    I cook with spare ribs, new york steak, fresh seafood.

    Psyllium????? Good god man, eat real food.

    TC

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Is it ok to prepare food with small amounts of psyllium? For example, a
    > serving of pasta sauce with a half teaspoon or so mixed in?
    >
    > I tried some Ronzoni whole wheat noodles the other day. The texture
    > wasn't quite to my liking and it's pricier than regular pasta. Instead,
    > I thought the fiber could be mixed in with the sauce. Of course, I know
    > it's better to mix vegetables to bulk up the sauce, but would cooking
    > with psyllium also work?
    >
    > Cooking with psyllium seems no different than cooking with bran and
    > I've read that psyllium has fewer side effects like excess gas. I don't
    > think bran would mix as well with tomato sauce.
     
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