coolmax alta jersey?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Gerrit Van Wijk, May 2, 2003.

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  1. All jersey makers claim to have the perfect bicycle jersey. Cool, super wicking, super comfy, non
    smelly, uv blocking. I have several bike- general sport- baselayer -hiking- shirts. Made from all
    kind of stuff, even wool. From nonames to damn expensive. Adidas, craft, nike, helly hansen,
    castelli. They all fall short because they are uncomfy, to warm, don't wick fast enough or stay wet.

    The only jersey I like sofar is made from coolmax. (It works even better with a löffler
    polypropyleen net undershirt www.loeffler.at )

    What jersey do you like for hot summer rides? Is coolmax alta or polartec powerdry any good? Does
    anyone even make a jersey from coolmax alta or powerdry?
     
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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "gerrit van wijk" <[email protected]> wrote in news:b8ugp4$do5uf$1
    @ID-176374.news.dfncis.de:
    > What jersey do you like for hot summer rides? Is coolmax alta or polartec powerdry any good? Does
    > anyone even make a jersey from coolmax alta or powerdry?

    Personally, I like waffle or grid knit fabrics. The alternating thin/thick fabric gives you great
    ventilation, but is still durable and protects you from the sun. I especially like Castelli's
    MicroSpitech grid knit fabric which stretches so you can wear it snug without binding.

    I do see Coolmax Alta on many low-to-mid range jerseys (in USA bike shops). I haven't been very
    impressed by those, though it could just be the low end construction quality. The fabric seems
    thicker and less breathable than the waffle knit fabrics.
     
  3. > What jersey do you like for hot summer rides? Is coolmax alta or polartec powerdry any good? Does
    > anyone even make a jersey from coolmax alta or powerdry?
    >

    Riding in >100 degree weather in Arizona, I like coolmax alta the best. I have yet to cook in it
    yet, (just make sure you keep drinking water or nothing works).
     
  4. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    OT, but coolmax socks are the best thing ever, and I don't mean just for athletics - I wear coolmax
    "dress" socks every day.

    http://tinyurl.com/av8o

    "gerrit van wijk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > All jersey makers claim to have the perfect bicycle jersey. Cool, super wicking, super comfy,
    > non smelly, uv blocking. I have several bike- general sport- baselayer -hiking- shirts. Made
    > from all kind of stuff, even wool. From nonames to damn expensive. Adidas, craft, nike, helly
    > hansen, castelli. They all fall short because they are uncomfy, to warm, don't wick fast enough
    > or stay wet.
    >
    > The only jersey I like sofar is made from coolmax. (It works even better with a löffler
    > polypropyleen net undershirt www.loeffler.at )
    >
    > What jersey do you like for hot summer rides? Is coolmax alta or polartec powerdry any good? Does
    > anyone even make a jersey from coolmax alta or powerdry?
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  5. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "gerrit van wijk" <[email protected]> wrote in news:b8ugp4$do5uf$1
    >>
    > Personally, I like waffle or grid knit fabrics. The alternating thin/thick fabric gives you great
    > ventilation, but is still durable and protects you from the sun. I especially like Castelli's
    > MicroSpitech grid knit fabric which stretches so you can wear it snug without binding.
    >
    > I do see Coolmax Alta on many low-to-mid range jerseys (in USA bike shops). I haven't been very
    > impressed by those, though it could just be the low end construction quality. The fabric seems
    > thicker and less breathable than the waffle knit fabrics.

    I have a PI mesh type jersey that works pretty well in hot weather. I also have a couple of thin,
    kind of fuzzy, Coolmax jerseys (don't know if it's Alta). Coolmax wicks so well, that the
    evaporative effect can chill you on a downhill run, even on a hot & humid day.

    What I wear a lot are those $10 Coolmax t-shirts (like Duofold). If it's a short ride where I don't
    need pockets, I'll just go with those.

    I have a bunch of other (synthetic) jerseys that I never wear any more, the fabrics are just not as
    comfortable, and these are relatively new PI and Voler.
     
  6. Sam Huffman

    Sam Huffman Guest

    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> writes:

    > "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > "gerrit van wijk" <[email protected]> wrote in news:b8ugp4$do5uf$1
    > >>
    > > Personally, I like waffle or grid knit fabrics. The alternating thin/thick fabric gives you
    > > great ventilation, but is still durable and protects you from the sun. I especially like
    > > Castelli's MicroSpitech grid knit fabric which stretches so you can wear it snug without
    > > binding.
    > >
    > > I do see Coolmax Alta on many low-to-mid range jerseys (in USA bike shops). I haven't been very
    > > impressed by those, though it could just be the low end construction quality. The fabric seems
    > > thicker and less breathable than the waffle knit fabrics.
    >
    > I have a PI mesh type jersey that works pretty well in hot weather. I also have a couple of thin,
    > kind of fuzzy, Coolmax jerseys (don't know if it's Alta). Coolmax wicks so well, that the
    > evaporative effect can chill you on a downhill run, even on a hot & humid day.
    >
    > What I wear a lot are those $10 Coolmax t-shirts (like Duofold). If it's a short ride where I
    > don't need pockets, I'll just go with those.

    How do you avoid the static issue with these shirts? I like them because they are lightweight, cool,
    and inexpensive but after a couple hours they cling to everything.

    I've taken to wearing some slightly more expensive synthetic t-shirts (mountain hard-wear has
    some nice ones, and Performance has a great sale on Hind shirts ( http://tinyurl.com/b0ch ) that
    work well too.

    Sam
     
  7. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Sam Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> writes:

    > > What I wear a lot are those $10 Coolmax t-shirts (like Duofold). If it's a short ride where I
    > > don't need pockets, I'll just go with those.
    >
    > How do you avoid the static issue with these shirts? I like them because
    they
    > are lightweight, cool, and inexpensive but after a couple hours they cling
    to
    > everything.

    I sweat.
     
  8. David Favro

    David Favro Guest

    I can't justify paying big bucks for a shirt made of a fancy "wicking" fabric for hot weather, when
    just removing the shirt entirely does the best "wicking" of all.

    The whole idea is to have your sweat evaporate in such a way that it cools you: having it soaked
    into a fabric from which it then evaporates will cool the fabric, which in the absolute best case
    will only cool you exactly as much as no shirt at all, and you'll never get to 100% efficiency
    unless the shirt is of an extremely tight cut, which usually are the super-expensive ones. It does
    protect you from the sun, but if the shirt is of a darker color than your skin, this just makes
    you even hotter, and unless you wear long-sleeved shirts, you have to deal with sun on skin in
    some way anyhow.

    I use a sponge tied to the end of a stick to apply sun-block to my back, and I've yet to find a
    shirt that keeps me as cool as none at all. That said, I do have a few inexepensive wicking shirts
    for the not-so-hot riding.
     
  9. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Not a good idea! I don't know many riders who believe
    that drilling a
    > hole in a frame tube is a reasonable concept. I assume
    the rivnut was
    > securely tightened and painted to prevent motion,
    corrosion and water
    > intrusion. Normally a water bottle thread is brazed or
    welded into
    > the tube, thereby becoming a structural reinforcement for
    the hole in
    > the tube. A rivnut is not doing anything for strength and
    is not part
    > of the tube and I suspect it will loosen with time, having
    no preload.

    I've been using stainless steel pop rivets and rivnuts for nearly 30 years with no problems. They do
    have to be installed tightly. A dab of silicone keeps corrosion at bay.

    However, as Mike mentioned, I wouldn't be surprised if some modern bicycle tubes are too thin to
    support a water bottle with a rivet.

    Matt O.
     
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