Correct seatpost binder bolt for Merckx MX Leader?



D

Doug Van Cleve

Guest
Howdy folks.

I am putting together a Merckx MX Leader and it clearly did not have
the correct seatpost binder bolt when I took things apart. I was going
to get a Campy bolt, but looking more closely it look like it might
have the notch for one of the keyed bolts. Anybody have an MX Leader
that definitely has the correct binder bolt? If you wouldn't mind
e-mailing me in addition to/instead of posting that would be great

Thanks, Doug
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
Doug Van Cleve wrote:
> Howdy folks.
>
> I am putting together a Merckx MX Leader and it clearly did not have
> the correct seatpost binder bolt when I took things apart. I was going
> to get a Campy bolt, but looking more closely it look like it might
> have the notch for one of the keyed bolts. Anybody have an MX Leader
> that definitely has the correct binder bolt? If you wouldn't mind
> e-mailing me in addition to/instead of posting that would be great
>
> Thanks, Doug


Use the Campag one or use the notched one after you have grounded the
notch off as there isn't a place for it to 'live' in then frame.

I own two MXLeaders, the finest frame I have ever ridden, period!!
 
D

Donald Gillies

Guest
I think it's simple.

First of all, in 1974 campy did not offer a seatpost bolt, period.
Those weren't offered by campy until the later 1970's, and they were
alan bolts. There was a big hollow one, and the one you can still buy
today. My 1974 paramount came with a big chunky nut and bolt that
looked like it was purchased at Ace hardware stores. While adjusting
such bolts one would always screw up the finish with the wrench - but
this was easy to avoid if you had an ALAN bolt.

The only "name brand" seat bolts that i'm aware of in the early 1970's
are the raleigh / carlton / gazelle ones ("R", "C", and "G"-nuts), the
cinelli bolts (super corsa), and the TA ref #365 and #368 bolts :

http://www.blackbirdsf.org/ta/other.html#odds

Campy (i believe) patented or was an exclusive offerer of the "no
notch" seatpost bolt. It had serrations all around to "bite into" the
paint and metal of the seat lug ears.

Until the late 1970's, ALL bicycles came with notched ears for a seat
bolt. Having the notches simply means that you have a frame that's
compatible with seat bolts offered in the 20th century.

The MX leader (I think) did not come out until the late 1970's or
early 1980's so "full campagnolo" would probably be the equipment of
choice for the bike, and this would include the seatpost bolt.

- Don Gillies
San Diego, CA
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
Donald Gillies wrote:
> I think it's simple.
>
> First of all, in 1974 campy did not offer a seatpost bolt, period.
> Those weren't offered by campy until the later 1970's, and they were
> alan bolts. There was a big hollow one, and the one you can still buy
> today. My 1974 paramount came with a big chunky nut and bolt that
> looked like it was purchased at Ace hardware stores. While adjusting
> such bolts one would always screw up the finish with the wrench - but
> this was easy to avoid if you had an ALAN bolt.
>
> The only "name brand" seat bolts that i'm aware of in the early 1970's
> are the raleigh / carlton / gazelle ones ("R", "C", and "G"-nuts), the
> cinelli bolts (super corsa), and the TA ref #365 and #368 bolts :
>
> http://www.blackbirdsf.org/ta/other.html#odds
>
> Campy (i believe) patented or was an exclusive offerer of the "no
> notch" seatpost bolt. It had serrations all around to "bite into" the
> paint and metal of the seat lug ears.
>
> Until the late 1970's, ALL bicycles came with notched ears for a seat
> bolt. Having the notches simply means that you have a frame that's
> compatible with seat bolts offered in the 20th century.
>
> The MX leader (I think) did not come out until the late 1970's or
> early 1980's so "full campagnolo" would probably be the equipment of
> choice for the bike, and this would include the seatpost bolt.
>
> - Don Gillies
> San Diego, CA


Uh, we do have both google and campyonly.com. Also, many
of us were actually riding the equipment then.

Broached six-sided socket head screws driven with a
six-sided key were developed by Allen Co.

Alan, the Italian product of Fabo, SpA, is unrelated.

Campagnolo's #830 seat bolt (10mm) and 1073 seat bolt (8mm)
are in the 1972 catalog. Just because your bike of the era (
and mine too) used a cheap bolt doesn't mean they didn't exist.

"full Campagnolo", then and now, is a nebulous term.




--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
D

Donald Gillies

Guest
A Muzi <[email protected]> writes:

>Uh, we do have both google and campyonly.com. Also, many
>of us were actually riding the equipment then.


>Broached six-sided socket head screws driven with a
>six-sided key were developed by Allen Co.


>Alan, the Italian product of Fabo, SpA, is unrelated.


>Campagnolo's #830 seat bolt (10mm) and 1073 seat bolt (8mm)
>are in the 1972 catalog. Just because your bike of the era (
>and mine too) used a cheap bolt doesn't mean they didn't exist.


Indeed I am mistaken, thanx for the correction andrew. I was told at
one point that an alan-head bolt for my 1974 paramount would be
incorrect because campagnolo did not offer that item in the early
70's. I shouldn't have believed that information. I see now that
it's in catalogue 16a, issued in November of 1971. Sorry for the
mixup.

And you're right, I didn't start riding 10-speeds until January of
1972, not November of 1971.

- Don Gillies
San Diego, CA