Corrour, Ossian and overnight stay

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Martin Richardson, Jan 13, 2006.

  1. Because of that pesky 4%, I need to spend a couple of days around Loch
    Ossian in February. Morgan's Den seems to be no more. Looks like the
    Yoof Hostel is either closed or you have to book the whole place for a
    week. Googling leads to suggestions that the landowners frown on camping
    near the loch.

    However, has anyone got any suggestions about where I could stick a
    tent? For example, has anyone camped near the footbridge at NN 41800
    70140?

    I will have a bike to go up and down the estate roads - it would be
    handy not to have to leave that too far away from the tent.
    --
    Martin Richardson
    272/284 Munros - 4% to go 34/34 'Furths'- 0% to go
    56/89 Donalds - 37% to go 494/1554 Marilyns - 68% to go
    376/525 Hewitts - 28% to go (E=178/178; W=137/137; I=61/211)
     
    Tags:


  2. Swello

    Swello Guest

    Probably stating to obvious to someone of your experience in Scottish
    walking - but you've got every right to wild-camp at Loch Ossian - as
    long as the usual common-sense approach is followed. Obviously if you
    feel that doing something the estate owners have historically never
    been keen on is not "common-sense", then you won't do it. From my point
    of view - 1 small tent (and a bike lying in the heather near by)
    shouldn't offend anyone.

    I did Beinn na Lap via a Train from Bridge of Orchy in a morning last
    April and I remember making a mental note to revisit the area in a more
    leisurely fashion for some camping at one point - maybe as part of a
    through walk as I've climbed the surrounding Munros.

    Good luck on the 4% :)
     
  3. AndyP

    AndyP Guest

    "Martin Richardson" <[email protected]> wrote

    > However, has anyone got any suggestions about where I could stick a
    > tent? For example, has anyone camped near the footbridge at NN 41800
    > 70140?


    > I will have a bike to go up and down the estate roads - it would be
    > handy not to have to leave that too far away from the tent.


    Don't know about right by the footbridge specifically but there are several
    good places to stick a tent not too much further up the Uisge Labhair
    towards Ben Alder. I remember thinking the descent to Ben Alder Cottage
    from Bealach Cumhann would be great on a bike if you're into that kind of
    thing, so long as you can jump the drainage ditches.

    Last time I was there by the way the bit of forestry that the path shown on
    the map between the footbridge you mentioned and Loch Ossian goes through
    was being used to keep wild boar in so I decided it maybe best to go back
    and take the other way around but perhaps they're quite cute and harmless
    really.
     
  4. > Last time I was there by the way the bit of forestry that the path
    > shown on the map between the footbridge you mentioned and Loch Ossian
    > goes through was being used to keep wild boar in so I decided it maybe
    > best to go back and take the other way around but perhaps they're
    > quite cute and harmless really.


    Yeah, they keep themselves hidden and aren't dangerous at all. They're
    living wild in quite a few woodlands back home in Kent (and in other
    counties). They've been around for well over a decade now with AFAIK no
    reports of problems.

    Usual stuff applies, like if you see some piglets keep well clear, keep dog
    well under control (i.e. not ferreting about off the trail, ready to come
    hairing back to you with an angry sow on it's tail etc).
     
  5. druidh

    druidh Guest

    I've camped on the North shore of the loch under Beinn na Lap. There
    are lots of snug little clearings which will "hide" your tent
    comfortably (assuming it's not a bright orange monster). Alternatively,
    I've also camped upstream from the footbridge. This will be beside the
    path, so you may feel a little more "exposed" and less comfortable
    about leaving your tent behind for the day (not that you're likely to
    experience any problems).

    If you're after Aonach Beag and Beinn Eibhinn, I can heartily recommend
    a cycle in from the North at NN 432830 to NN445786 and a circuit around
    Coire Gorm.

    Great area btw. What's all in the 4%?


    druidh
     
  6. Lindsay

    Lindsay Guest

    The bunkhouses at Corrour are closed. Apparently the sewage system
    has collapsed and it belongs to the railway authority and they are
    unlikely to reapir it due to the fact that it is is only a railway
    'halt'. The Youth Hostel will be closed till the Spring unless you go
    for 'Rent a Hostel' where you hire the whole building.

    As for wild camping. In terms of the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003
    you are entitled to rough camp. However you must be out of sight of
    habitation, which I think really means that you can't camp in someones
    front lawn. The Estate have no right to stop you wild camping or in
    fact walking. The hind stalking season also ends in February.

    The new legislation uses the word ' reasonable', so both walkers and
    estate owners have to behave reasonably.
     
  7. Gavin Shaw

    Gavin Shaw Guest

    The message <[email protected]>
    from Martin Richardson <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > Because of that pesky 4%, I need to spend a couple of days around Loch
    > Ossian in February. Morgan's Den seems to be no more. Looks like the
    > Yoof Hostel is either closed or you have to book the whole place for a
    > week. Googling leads to suggestions that the landowners frown on camping
    > near the loch.


    > However, has anyone got any suggestions about where I could stick a
    > tent? For example, has anyone camped near the footbridge at NN 41800
    > 70140?


    > I will have a bike to go up and down the estate roads - it would be
    > handy not to have to leave that too far away from the tent.
    > --
    > Martin Richardson
    > 272/284 Munros - 4% to go 34/34 'Furths'- 0% to go
    > 56/89 Donalds - 37% to go 494/1554 Marilyns - 68% to go
    > 376/525 Hewitts - 28% to go (E=178/178; W=137/137; I=61/211)


    Martin,

    I can confirm that there is a large flat area of short cropped grass
    just downstream of the bridge, at 41720 70180. Plenty room for many a
    tent, not secluded, but 'out of sight of habitation'.

    Gavin
     
  8. In message <[email protected]>,
    druidh <[email protected]> writes
    >I've camped on the North shore of the loch under Beinn na Lap. There
    >are lots of snug little clearings which will "hide" your tent
    >comfortably (assuming it's not a bright orange monster). Alternatively,
    >I've also camped upstream from the footbridge. This will be beside the
    >path, so you may feel a little more "exposed" and less comfortable
    >about leaving your tent behind for the day (not that you're likely to
    >experience any problems).
    >
    >If you're after Aonach Beag and Beinn Eibhinn, I can heartily recommend
    >a cycle in from the North at NN 432830 to NN445786 and a circuit around
    >Coire Gorm.
    >
    >Great area btw. What's all in the 4%?
    >

    Thanks - and to all the other answers. The 4% are Ben Vane (don't ask
    how that happened to be left isolated, considering the number of times I
    have driven past); the Fersit/Loch Treig 4; the Ossian 3 i.e. Beinn na
    Lap, Carn Dearg & Sgor Gaibhre; Beinn Dearg - and then two thirds of
    Beinn a Ghlo abandoned part way through last winter because of high
    winds. Oh - and then there is the small matter of the May expedition to
    Mull.

    --
    Martin Richardson
    272/284 Munros - 4% to go 34/34 'Furths'- 0% to go
    56/89 Donalds - 37% to go 494/1554 Marilyns - 68% to go
    376/525 Hewitts - 28% to go (E=178/178; W=137/137; I=61/211)
     
  9. druidh

    druidh Guest

    Martin Richardson wrote:
    > In message <[email protected]>,
    > druidh <[email protected]> writes
    >> Great area btw. What's all in the 4%?
    >>

    > Thanks - and to all the other answers. The 4% are Ben Vane (don't ask
    > how that happened to be left isolated, considering the number of times I
    > have driven past); the Fersit/Loch Treig 4; the Ossian 3 i.e. Beinn na
    > Lap, Carn Dearg & Sgor Gaibhre; Beinn Dearg - and then two thirds of
    > Beinn a Ghlo abandoned part way through last winter because of high
    > winds. Oh - and then there is the small matter of the May expedition to
    > Mull.
    >

    Ah - Beinn a Ghlo. for some reason, still one of my favourites. Done it
    in summer, done it in winter (crampons for most of the high level). Lovely.

    So - all these to be done before May then?



    druidh
     
  10. In message <[email protected]>, druidh
    <[email protected]> writes
    >Martin Richardson wrote:
    >> In message <[email protected]>,
    >>druidh <[email protected]> writes
    >>> Great area btw. What's all in the 4%?
    >>>

    >> Thanks - and to all the other answers. The 4% are Ben Vane (don't ask
    >>how that happened to be left isolated, considering the number of times
    >>I have driven past); the Fersit/Loch Treig 4; the Ossian 3 i.e. Beinn
    >>Lap, Carn Dearg & Sgor Gaibhre; Beinn Dearg - and then two thirds of
    >>Beinn a Ghlo abandoned part way through last winter because of high
    >>winds. Oh - and then there is the small matter of the May expedition
    >>to Mull.
    >>

    >Ah - Beinn a Ghlo. for some reason, still one of my favourites. Done it
    >in summer, done it in winter (crampons for most of the high level).
    >Lovely.
    >
    >So - all these to be done before May then?
    >

    The plan is to clear all but the last in February - there is always
    Easter, if not (although there is a half plan to do the Isle of Man
    Marilyns then - as they remain as a major proportion of the remaining
    un-ascented within the 200km radius of my home). And, yes I am very much
    looking forward to having another go at B a G.
    --
    Martin Richardson
    272/284 Munros - 4% to go 34/34 'Furths'- 0% to go
    56/89 Donalds - 37% to go 494/1554 Marilyns - 68% to go
    376/525 Hewitts - 28% to go (E=178/178; W=137/137; I=61/211)
     
  11. AndyP

    AndyP Guest

    "Mark Thompson" <[email protected]> wrote

    [Wild Boar]
    > Yeah, they keep themselves hidden and aren't dangerous at all. They're
    > living wild in quite a few woodlands back home in Kent (and in other
    > counties). They've been around for well over a decade now with AFAIK no
    > reports of problems.
    >
    > Usual stuff applies, like if you see some piglets keep well clear, keep

    dog
    > well under control (i.e. not ferreting about off the trail, ready to come
    > hairing back to you with an angry sow on it's tail etc).


    There was a regional programme last week about wild boar escapees in the
    Forest of Dean where a lady related being chased by a group of them whilst
    out horse riding. I think she mentioned having a dog with her. Some
    farmers aren't too keen on having fields rooted up and want them all shot
    which apparently is an option being considered by DEFRA. Some have been
    shot by individuals.
     
  12. > Some farmers aren't too keen on having fields rooted up and want
    > them all shot which apparently is an option being considered by DEFRA.
    > Some have been shot by individuals.


    Heh, they've been around for ages. If DEFRA were serious about doing
    anything then they'd have done it before they increased so much in number
    and spread so widely. I suspect that their reclusive nature, their
    woodland habitat etc means that individuals shooting individual boar is the
    best that could happen.

    Despite crop damage and possible danger to people with dogs, it's quite
    nice having boar about. I've always been slightly embarrased that the UK's
    scariest wild animal was a fox :-/
     
  13. Roger

    Roger Guest

    The message <[email protected]>
    from Mark Thompson <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > Despite crop damage and possible danger to people with dogs, it's quite
    > nice having boar about. I've always been slightly embarrased that the UK's
    > scariest wild animal was a fox :-/


    Never met a red deer stag then? A farmer was killed by one some time
    last year and that was supposedly domesticated.

    --
    Roger Chapman so far this year nothing
     
  14. Alan Bremner

    Alan Bremner Guest

    On Fri, 13 Jan 2006 09:01:05 +0000, Martin Richardson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >However, has anyone got any suggestions about where I could stick a
    >tent?


    Martin,

    A few years ago I camped below Sgor Gaibhre, above the tree line near
    the estate cottages S of Corrour Lodge (we came in by bike from Glen
    Spean). No hassle from the estate at all; quite the opposite in fact.
    They even offered to keep an eye on our bikes.

    Btw, watch for eagles on Beinn na Lap. We nearly trod on one having a
    nap in a hollow near the summit and cacked ourselves as it took off
    right in front of us. :)

    Al
    Al
    --
    [This space left intentionally blank]
     
  15. John Mansell

    John Mansell Guest

    How about

    http://www.hostel-scotland.co.uk/hostels/index.asp?ID=67

    and by rail to/from Corrour halt?

    The same site also shows accommodation in Roy Bridge. Roy Bridge has
    *bars* and a rail halt.



    In message <[email protected]>, Martin Richardson
    <[email protected]> writes
    >Because of that pesky 4%, I need to spend a couple of days around Loch
    >Ossian in February. Morgan's Den seems to be no more. Looks like the
    >Yoof Hostel is either closed or you have to book the whole place for a
    >week. Googling leads to suggestions that the landowners frown on
    >camping near the loch.
    >
    >However, has anyone got any suggestions about where I could stick a
    >tent? For example, has anyone camped near the footbridge at NN 41800
    >70140?
    >
    >I will have a bike to go up and down the estate roads - it would be
    >handy not to have to leave that too far away from the tent.


    --
    John Mansell john at wcompsys dot co dot uk
     
  16. In message <[email protected]>, John Mansell
    <[email protected]> writes
    >How about
    >
    >http://www.hostel-scotland.co.uk/hostels/index.asp?ID=67
    >
    >and by rail to/from Corrour halt?
    >
    >The same site also shows accommodation in Roy Bridge. Roy Bridge has
    >*bars* and a rail halt.
    >

    Thanks for that - however, if I were to catch the train back each
    evening (and remember that the choice is either a rather early 15.38 or
    a rather late 21.20) I would simply resort to my usual practice of
    sleeping in my car in the Tulloch station car park. Bars offer no
    attraction as a non-drinker these days.

    --
    Martin Richardson
    272/284 Munros - 4% to go 34/34 'Furths'- 0% to go
    56/89 Donalds - 37% to go 494/1554 Marilyns - 68% to go
    376/525 Hewitts - 28% to go (E=178/178; W=137/137; I=61/211)
     
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