corsa vs. speed machine

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Bill, Mar 11, 2003.

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  1. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Which bike would be faster on flat roads and which one would be better on hills? Also, which one is
    more comfortable for those who have ridden both? Thanks in advance.
     
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  2. Bill Goldsmith asked:

    > Which bike would be faster on flat roads

    I would imagine the Speedmachine, as it's lower and a bit more reclined.

    > and which one would be better on hills?

    Probably the Corsa - it's lighter.

    > Also, which one is more comfortable for those who have ridden both?

    Have I ridden a Corsa? - point, clickety-click - no, it was an Aero, but the riding positions and
    seat appear to be the same in all bar materials (pray correct me if I am wrong). But I didn't ride
    it very far, whereas I have 9000 km on my Speedmachine. I find the Speedmachine very comfortable -
    remember that that it has dual suspension - but would need a fair bit more stick time on a Corsa /
    Aero before I was sure about it. I *did* get the (mistaken) impression that I was about to slide
    forwards out of the seat on the Aero, which felt *most* disconcerting.

    Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  3. Derek Swift

    Derek Swift Guest

    > Which bike would be faster on flat roads and which one would be better on hills? Also, which one
    > is more comfortable for those who have ridden both? Thanks in advance.

    IMHO, a tough call. The Speedmachine is more reclined. But, it is 11 lbs heavier. I think of
    the Speedmachine to be a better all-around bikes. The disadvantage for me, was lack of a dealer
    in my area.

    Derek
     
  4. John W

    John W Guest

    I have test rode a speed machine but never rode a Corsa. I would have a Speed Machine but wife would
    kill me if I brought another recumbent home (we have 4). I thought the Speed Machine rode and
    handled great and the suspension sure smoothed out those rough roads. I think it would be a great
    all around bent. There was a write up on the Speed Machine about a year ago in RCN. I think the
    Jan/Feb 2003 RCN has a write up on the Bacchetta bikes. One other thing about the Speed Machine is
    it has the COOL factor look to
    it.

    John

    "bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Which bike would be faster on flat roads and which one would be better on hills? Also, which one
    > is more comfortable for those who have ridden both? Thanks in advance.
     
  5. Mike Warner

    Mike Warner Guest

    Dave Larrington wrote:

    > Bill Goldsmith asked:
    >
    >> Which bike would be faster on flat roads
    >
    > I would imagine the Speedmachine, as it's lower and a bit more reclined.
    >
    >> and which one would be better on hills?
    >
    > Probably the Corsa - it's lighter.
    >
    >> Also, which one is more comfortable for those who have ridden both?
    >
    > Have I ridden a Corsa? - point, clickety-click - no, it was an Aero, but the riding positions and
    > seat appear to be the same in all bar materials (pray correct me if I am wrong). But I didn't ride
    > it very far, whereas I have 9000 km on my Speedmachine. I find the Speedmachine very comfortable -
    > remember that that it has dual suspension - but would need a fair bit more stick time on a Corsa /
    > Aero before I was sure about it. I *did* get the (mistaken) impression that I was about to slide
    > forwards out of the seat on the Aero, which felt *most* disconcerting.
    >
    > Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    > ===========================================================
    > Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    > http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    > ===========================================================

    By "forward" do you mean "backward"? As you pushed on the pedals, you felt like you were sliding
    back, off the seat?

    I *often* wonder about all this preoccupation with maxium recline. It seems that, if you were to
    pedal with any real power, beyond a certain recline, you'd tend to just slide backwards off the
    seat. Beyond a certain recline, you really need a harness. You'll notice that when Rob English, who
    has ridden an Optima Baron convincingly, built his Hachi lowracer, he did NOT go for total recline.
    English opted for a more upright seat so he could push harder against it without sliding off it.

    m
    --
    Replace "crap" with "warnerm" in my email addr
     
  6. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Mike Warner wrote:
    > ... I *often* wonder about all this preoccupation with maxium recline. It seems that, if you were
    > to pedal with any real power, beyond a certain recline, you'd tend to just slide backwards off
    > the seat. Beyond a certain recline, you really need a harness. You'll notice that when Rob
    > English, who has ridden an Optima Baron convincingly, built his Hachi lowracer, he did NOT go for
    > total recline. English opted for a more upright seat so he could push harder against it without
    > sliding off it.
    >
    > m

    Another solution is to use a seat design that keeps the rider from moving backwards. One such design
    is Sean Costin's "Monkey Hand" [1]. This design could be considered successful for power generation
    during sprinting, since Sean won a world championship on it.

    [1] < http://www.wisil.recumbents.com/wisil/costin/seancostin.htm > fourth picture from the bottom.

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  7. Carl

    Carl Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mike Warner <[email protected]> wrote:

    > By "forward" do you mean "backward"? As you pushed on the pedals, you felt like you were sliding
    > back, off the seat?

    I can't speak for Dave, but I think I know what he means. I felt the same way when I first put the
    carbon seat on my Strada. It really does feel like you could slide off forwards - like you have to
    press against the pedals to stop yourself from sliding off the seat and landing on the frame.

    I still feel like that from time to time. I think it's just one of those illusions you get used to
    after a while. A few more miles & I probably won't notice it at all anymore.

    -Carl
     
  8. Mike Warner asked:

    > By "forward" do you mean "backward"? As you pushed on the pedals, you felt like you were sliding
    > back, off the seat?

    No, I meant forward, as though I was sliding off the front of the seat.

    > beyond a certain recline, you'd tend to just slide backwards off the seat. Beyond a certain
    > recline, you really need a harness.

    Hmm. I have no problems on my Baron, and AFAIK Ian Humphries has no problems on his trike which has
    a seat angle of ten degrees.

    > You'll notice that when Rob English, who has ridden an Optima Baron convincingly, built his Hachi
    > lowracer, he did NOT go for total recline. English opted for a more upright seat so he could push
    > harder against it without sliding off it.

    He opted for a more upright seat as it is generally held that a more closed riding position allows
    the rider to generate more power. With the low seat and high b/b of the Hachi, he could therefore
    have less frontal area than the Baron *and* a more closed riding position, which is a win-win as
    long as you don't find the position too uncomfortable.

    Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
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