cost for building a bike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Jeff Sutton, May 15, 2003.

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  1. Jeff Sutton

    Jeff Sutton Guest

    How much do most bike shops charge for building a bike (assuming I provide frame and components)?

    TIA

    Jeff
     
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  2. > How much do most bike shops charge for building a bike (assuming I provide frame and components)?

    It's going to depend upon several factors, including the general cost of doing business in your area
    and the expertise of the shop. In our area (San Francisco Bay Area), this ranges from perhaps $150
    up to $400. At many shops, the $150 would *not* be a bargain. At some shops, the $400 might be a
    rip-off. Best to get recommendations from local cyclists, as well as your own gut feelings (if you
    have a shop that's been good to deal with for other things, it's quite possible they'd be a good
    place for the assembly).

    Having said all that, it's almost always preferable to have the bike assembled by the same people
    who sold you the frame & components. Much less potential for finger-pointing that way. It also goes
    without saying that it will be easier to be properly fit, since they can swap components to
    properly size you.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  3. Baltobernie

    Baltobernie Guest

    Our local builder charges $100; not including wheel building.

    Bernie

    Mike Jacoubowsky <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > How much do most bike shops charge for building a bike (assuming I
    provide
    > > frame and components)?
    >
    > It's going to depend upon several factors, including the general cost of doing business in your
    > area and the expertise of the shop. In our area
    (San
    > Francisco Bay Area), this ranges from perhaps $150 up to $400. At many shops, the $150 would *not*
    > be a bargain. At some shops, the $400 might
    be
    > a rip-off. Best to get recommendations from local cyclists, as well as
    your
    > own gut feelings (if you have a shop that's been good to deal with for
    other
    > things, it's quite possible they'd be a good place for the assembly).
    >
    > Having said all that, it's almost always preferable to have the bike assembled by the same people
    > who sold you the frame & components. Much
    less
    > potential for finger-pointing that way. It also goes without saying that
    it
    > will be easier to be properly fit, since they can swap components to properly size you.
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  4. Appkiller

    Appkiller Guest

    Jeff:

    My ~2 cents worth:

    Have the Headset, BB and crank professionally installed (including facing and thread chasing) and do
    the rest yourself. Probably cost you $50 - $75 and you'll learn a lot in the process. All the tools
    you need are a set of wire cutters, a set of hex wrenches (metric), flat and phillips screwdrivers,
    an adjustable wrench and some patience. Oh, and some knowledge source, such as the Park Tool web
    site which has detailed instructions for most if not all of the work you will need to do.

    App

    "Jeff Sutton" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > How much do most bike shops charge for building a bike (assuming I provide frame and components)?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Jeff
     
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