Could false technique induce compartment syndrome?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Jk, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. Jk

    Jk Guest

    I have been suffering from compartment syndrome (pain on the anterior compartment of the lower leg)
    for over a year now. The pain is usually on my left leg and on rare occasions on the right but never
    on both legs at the same time. I´ve read something about compartment syndrome on the internet and
    found out that the only cure for this ´disease´ is fasciotomy. Resting for a couple of months (last
    summer) has not helped. The pain on the left leg usually starts after about ten minutes of running.
    After I´ve ran about a half an hour the pain usually gradually decreases. That is why I have still
    been able to enjoy running although the first 30 minutes are sometimes painful and depressing. My
    question is if false running technique could induce the pain on the lower leg? After the pain hits
    my running changes a bit: I am no longer able to land on the heel but instead the foot starts
    ´slapping´ the ground due to the sudden weakness of the muscle on the anterior side of the shin. I
    am also wondering if running shoes could affect positively or negatively on the issue. I´ve been
    running with Asics DS Trainer VIII shoes.

    JK
     
    Tags:


  2. How do you know you have compartment syndrome? I'm asking because my symptoms are similar to yours,
    but my PA and massage therapist have diagnosed a torn/strained gastroc/achilles jusction. However,
    their diagnoses were made by external exam--no MRI, etc (although I don't know *what* kind of
    imaging would show an injury such as this).

    Just wondering--

    Jean in VA

    JK" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have been suffering from compartment syndrome (pain on the anterior compartment of the lower
    > leg) for over a year now. The pain is usually on
    my
    > left leg and on rare occasions on the right but never on both legs at the same time. I´ve read
    > something about compartment syndrome on the internet and found out that the only cure for this
    > ´disease´ is fasciotomy. Resting for a couple of months (last summer) has not helped. The pain on
    > the left leg usually starts after about ten minutes of running. After I´ve ran
    about
    > a half an hour the pain usually gradually decreases. That is why I have still been able to enjoy
    > running although the first 30 minutes are
    sometimes
    > painful and depressing. My question is if false running technique could induce the pain on the
    > lower leg? After the pain hits my running changes a bit: I am no longer
    able
    > to land on the heel but instead the foot starts ´slapping´ the ground due
    to
    > the sudden weakness of the muscle on the anterior side of the shin. I am also wondering if running
    > shoes could affect positively or negatively on
    the
    > issue. I´ve been running with Asics DS Trainer VIII shoes.
    >
    > JK
    >
     
  3. SwStudio

    SwStudio Guest

    "JK" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > I have been suffering from compartment syndrome (pain on the anterior compartment of the lower
    > leg) for over a year now.

    How was this diagnosed? (just interested)

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org "The most insecure people are the ones you see, putting
    other people down constantly."
     
  4. PaulM1125

    PaulM1125 Guest

    >> I have been suffering from compartment syndrome (pain on the anterior compartment of the lower
    >> leg) for over a year now.
    >
    >How was this diagnosed? (just interested)

    Same question I would have. There is a specific, though not entirely pleasant, test for compartment
    syndrome. The fact that it goes away mid-run would make me suspect something else is going on.

    Just from browsing the news group, compartment syndrome seems to be overly self-diagnosed by
    runners. It is rare. (But for that reason, doctors also often miss it.) Important to make sure>

    Paul
     
  5. Jk

    Jk Guest

    This is indeed self-diagnosed. After reading old discussions about compartment syndrome I found out
    that my symptoms were alike. Some runners who had suffered from the pain wrote that the pain can
    sometimes go away after some walking and stretching. I´ve noticed the same. If you have any idea
    what other this might be please let me know. I can live with the pain but it would be nice to know
    what causes it. Is it solely anatomical (the fascia is too tight or the muscle too big) or is there
    some kind of technical error that could be corrected?

    "PaulM1125" <[email protected]> kirjoitti viestissä news:[email protected]
    m04.aol.com...
    >
    > >> I have been suffering from compartment syndrome (pain on the anterior compartment of the lower
    > >> leg) for over a year now.
    > >
    > >How was this diagnosed? (just interested)
    >
    > Same question I would have. There is a specific, though not entirely
    pleasant,
    > test for compartment syndrome. The fact that it goes away mid-run would
    make me
    > suspect something else is going on.
    >
    > Just from browsing the news group, compartment syndrome seems to be overly self-diagnosed by
    > runners. It is rare. (But for that reason, doctors also often miss it.) Important to make
    sure>
    >
    > Paul
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, JK <[email protected]> wrote:

    -----snipped-----
    > My question is if false running technique could induce
    > the pain on the lower leg? After the pain hits my
    > running changes a bit: I am no longer able to land on
    > the heel but instead the foot starts ´slapping´ the
    > ground due to the sudden weakness of the muscle on the
    > anterior side of the shin. I am also wondering if
    > running shoes could affect positively or negatively on
    > the issue. I´ve been running with Asics DS Trainer
    > VIII shoes.
    >
    > JK

    Some folklore on shin splints and ways to think about what
    causes shin splints. A different way to think about shin
    splints and some things to do about them.

    Healing Shin Splint Folklore and Prevention by Austin
    Gontang, September 25, 2000

    You can help me get better. I need you to rate my articles
    and their usefulness to you. Click the appropriate rating
    circle at the bottom of the articles. Your comments are
    appreciated and necessary to keep me rethinking my folklore
    and continue my lifelong learning. Ozzie

    I continue to believe that the shin spints come more from
    the overstride and the deceleration and then the overstretch
    of the shin which should be relaxing but hasn't had time. It
    is then being stretched by the contracting calf muscle. For
    me I define an overstride as landing on the back of the heel
    of the shoe. If I were jumping up and down, I would never
    land on the heels of my shoes nor on my heels if I were
    barefoot. So why run landing on the heels...and by this I
    mean the back of the heels if one were barefoot.

    For me the image remains that as I place my foot under my
    center of gravity, the rest of my body is catapulted forward
    from that platform. This means that the calf contracting
    isn't pushing the entire body weight forward. The body
    weight has been catapulted forward by the glut/ham on the
    planted foot(the platform), the thrust forward of the
    elbow/shoulder of the platform side and the quad/psoas of
    the leg coming through to conterbalance the torque of the
    platform side.

    Anyway here, as you mentioned would show up in a few days,
    some of the shin splint folklore which I have shared with
    several thousand people over the past 2 decades. In case you
    didn't see the post above or didn't get others on your ISP,
    I've compiled them:

    Shin Splint Folklore by Ozzie
    c. 2000 Austin "Ozzie" Gontang, Ph.D.

    Folklore #1

    Shin splints are from the posterior and anterior tibilis
    getting tight and holding on and not letting go. Every
    step becomes a pain in the shins when running. Remember
    that the problem may be the calf muscles which means the
    shins have to work against muscles which only partially
    relax putting all kinds of strain on the shin. See article
    mentioned in #3 below.

    As you run, walk, let your toes relax. Often going up on the
    toes means the shin is being elongated...and if it is tight
    and holding on, the calves have to overcome the tightness in
    the shins...gradually the shins from being overstretched,
    tighten even more...and then your body realizes that it is
    even difficult to walk.

    As you stand during your day practice standing so that you
    can wiggle your toes at all times. Lean forward and notice
    how the toes dig in. That posture can also be a problem
    spot for the shins which get chronically tight and the
    running when the shins should be relaxing...that is when
    the calves are contracting...the shins only partially relax
    and the pain is that of ripping a muscle that doesn't want
    to let go.

    The ultimate muscle though which we have all passed goes
    from 0 cm to 10 cm. Now you realize the need to focus on
    relaxing as the crown pushes against that muscle attempting
    to force it to go to 10 cm too quickly. Breathing and
    relaxing can relax against that pressure. For the shins,
    it's also teaching the shins to let go. Everyone (except a
    few of us) attempt to strengthen and make the shin stronger
    rather than release the tightened and bound shin muscles.

    Folklore #2

    Get on all fours on a carpeted floor with the feet off the
    edge of a step. Place a tennis ball under one anterior
    tibialis. Keep most of the weight on the other knee and
    hands. Move foot easily up and down as you put more pressure
    on the tennis ball and roll it slowly over the belly of the
    shin muscle. Do the other foot the same way. See which foot
    is giving you the most pain.

    Folklore #3a

    See http://www.mindfulness.com/of1.asp. Face the railing.
    Turn the feet and entire body so that it is 45 degrees to
    the bar. Place the anterior shin over the bar so that the
    shin muscle and NOT the shin bone rest on the rail. If rail
    is too high, use the middle rail. Slowly make a small circle
    with the foot and slowly slide the shin down the railing. Do
    once or twice and then switch, facing the rail but turning
    45 degrees in the other direction to do your other shin.

    Remember if you go too hard, too fast, too much, you'll
    only end up causing added problems as your muscle will
    tighten up even more to protect itself from your intensity.
    Go for the grace.

    Also remember that folklore means that if something doesnt'
    work for you, give it no power or energy but rather find
    someone who makes sense and whose folklore works for you.

    Folklore #3b

    One thing I've found over the years is that the peroneus,
    the muscle which runs down the outside of the leg - it
    everts the outside of the foot - often gets pulled and to
    protect itself it tightens- i.e. shortens. After the
    healing of the ligaments around the ankle, that peroneus
    (longus and medius portion) can remain in its semi-
    contracted state. which means it doesn't fully relax when
    the posterior tibialis - its counterpart - lifts the inside
    of the foot up.

    Way to loosen it with someone else helping.

    Have your partner start about 3 inches above the ankle
    bone. Hold as if you are going to strangle - fingers wrap
    around the lower leg, thumbs pointing toward each other
    or one thumb rests on the other thumb (if more pressure
    is desired).

    Have your partner use light pressure by pushing in with
    theirthumbs as you make a small (emphasis on small), smooth
    (emphasis on smooth) circle. As you makes small smooth
    circles with the foot your partner strangling your leg,
    slowly slides the thumbs up the peroneus muscle.

    The idea is that you can loosen the muscle from any
    adhesions and also you can loosen up the fascia which may be
    holding the peroneus from relaxing and going through it full
    range of motion.

    Usually after 3 or 4 times of small circles and your partner
    holding, walk. More often than not, you'll feel less
    pressure around the ankle as it can move more freely due to
    the freeing of the peroneus higher up the leg...which takes
    the tightness off the ankle area.

    The peroneus and posterior tibialis are often called stirrup
    muscles as they invert and evert the foot. They are also
    postural muscles and therefore slow twitch, in that they
    help maintain correct posture when functioning properly.

    To do the same thing, face a railing with a middle railing
    (see picture from web site). Turn your body 45 degrees and
    place the peroneus side of the leg on the bar, usually the
    lower is better unless you're very tall. Do the same foot
    movement as mentioned above to loosen the peroneus and the
    fascia which may be constricting the ankle for its full
    range of motion.

    Get back to us and let us know how it works. The web site
    picture where I have a group of people using the railing to
    loosen the belly of the calf muscle, gives you an idea of
    how to use the railing. The railing you want to use is the
    middle railing: http://www.mindfulness.com/of1.asp

    Folklore #3c

    > I have for the last couple of weeks had a pain just above
    > my right inside
    ankle. If I hold up my leg and roll my foot to the inside,
    it causes the ankle to hurt. Snip-----

    If I had that pain I'd look first to see if the posterior
    tibialis had tightened up in response to the hill work.

    Second, I'd have the "deep tissue cross friction
    message" read: "Please do some work on my peroneus,
    especially the longus; and show me a few ways of how I
    might do that myself."

    >From what you've said, I'd look at my form to see where I
    >was landing on my
    foot. I have been a strong proponent for ball/heel or
    midsole landing. That way I know that there is no
    overstride. Probably you're getting some overstride in you
    heavy workout, which causes the braking effect and causes
    the problem you mention.

    Folklore #4

    I'd look at the posterior tibialis, that muscle behind the
    shin bone on the inside.

    1. You are seated
    2. Left leg crossed on right thigh so outside of left
    leg rests on right thigh about 3 or 4 inches above
    right knee.
    3. place right thumb below left shin bone closest to you so
    it rests on the posterior tibialis
    4. Right hand rest on the shin bone.
    5. Place the left hand next to the right hand on the
    shin bone so that the left thumb rests on top of the
    right thumb.
    6. Make small (emphasis on small) and smooth (emphasis on
    smooth) circles with the left foot so there is no
    (spelled NO) jerkiness - otherwise you're just
    straining tendon.
    7. As you make the circle and the left toe goes downward,
    push in with the thumbs. With each circle move the
    thumbs about a quarter of an inch further up the leg.
    8. Find the spot that creates most pain and push more
    lightly at that spot so as not to create excrutiating
    pain and then move thumbs away first upward and then
    away downward, pushing harder so that you can feel the
    muscle under your thumbs let go.
    9. If you push too hard, go too fast, wince the face, stop
    breathing because of the pain, go too deep, you'll get
    the reverse of what you want.
    10. What you want is that posterior tibialis to let go so
    that your circle can move easily. Usually if it is
    bruised, the blood came from up above where the
    muscle tear took place and gravity let it settle
    where the bruise
    is.
    11. You'd like also to make sure that the posterior tibialis
    is not flush up again the shin bone. There should be
    some space where your thumb can go up that groove
    between the posterior shin muscle and the shin bone.

    Orgradually work to get it back, since if it's not there,
    then your shin is holding and probably the fascia won't
    allow the muscle to go through its range of motion and also
    the micro tears of the muscle or at the muscle tendon
    junction of the posterior shin muscle has scarred and also
    decreases the range of motion for the posterior shin.

    Let us know how it goes and what you learn so that we can
    all learn if my folklore worked for you, or was just
    folklore that needed to be discarded because it didn't work.

    Good luck with your experiment of one. Also during my
    training runs I often stop and work shins, calves, haves and
    quads loose so that my training run might be broken up by 10
    or 12 stops to massage out or rub out the sore spots.

    Check out the two articles listed and especially the
    pictures. I can use almost anything along my running path to
    assist me as a tool to release or massage tight muscles:

    http://www.mindfulness.com/of1.asp
    http://www.mindfulness.com/of5.asp

    In health and on the run, Ozzie Gontang Maintainer -
    rec.running FAQ Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est.
    1975

    Mindful Running: http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-
    faq/
     
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