Country Roads & DOGS

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by TAT 57, Jun 30, 2004.

  1. jungleexplorer

    jungleexplorer New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Are you sure that exposing the family jewels in front of a blood thirsty dog is what you want to do just to save a buck? Then again it might just save you a thousand dollar trip to the urologist for a vasectomy! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/ROTF.gif

    But if more bike riders would get a concealed gun license, they could just shoot the dog. Then maybe more dog owners would keep their dogs controled. I personally have never owned a dog that has ever bitten a human. I just won't tolerate it. I was attacked by two pit bulls when I was 6 years old while riding. They got me by each leg and bit me up pretty bad. The owners were two teenage boys that were watching and laughing up until they saw that their dogs were going to kill me and they called them off. They left me their injured and bleeding. I had to ride my bike for over a mile with a flat tire to get home. My dad called the Sheriff and had the dogs destroyed. Back in those days that is what happened to any dog that attacked a human. I was utterly terrified of dogs for years until I realized that my fear was activating their natural instinct to hunt. Dogs are not regular domestic animal. They are wild animals that were domesticated long ago for use as hunting aids. 99% of all original breeds of dogs were bred for a specific hunting purpose, not for cuddly pet purposes. This means that they are still dominated by their wild instincts to hunt and kill. Dogs have hyper senses and can detect when you are afraid of them. But they also can detect when you are mad and angry. When I discovered this, I converted my utter fear of them into a boiling rage and hatred for an aggressive dog. It is amazing what happens when a snarling dog comes at you and then detects that you are emotionally enraged and are about to kill it. In most cases the dog will sense that they have gone from the hunter to the hunted and run away. But this only works with untrained dogs. It does not work on trained attack dogs and mentally retarded dogs. But this technique has saved me from several potential dog attacks. Although it takes a lot of mental strength to control one's emotions when you are confronted by a blood thirsty dog. That is why I came up with the conversion technique of converting fear into rage, it's much easier to do. But don't think I am not serious about killing the dog if it bites me. I really will and the dog can sense that. You can't fake a dog out. You have to mean it or it won't work. No dog has ever lived that has ever attacked me or one of my family or friends. And that goes for any animal. A couple of years ago one of my roosters spurred a 4 year old girl. 3 minutes later it was missing it's head. It made some good chicken and dumpling, which the little girl thoroughly enjoyed. I do not tolerate animals that attack humans.
     


  2. chilln

    chilln New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Things I have learned to do in dealing with dog attack:

    Using a "command voice," saying firmly but loudly, STOP!

    If I can't avoid or get away, I use the bicycle as a shield between me and the dog.

    Sprays are a mild deterrent to a dog and may make them more aggressive. (I have had dogs back off when I hit them with some pepper spray though)

    I carry a stick in my back pocket that I whittled a blunt point on. I use it to either whack their snout or poke them in the nose with if it becomes necessary. In the cases that I had to take it out, because of a dog, the dog sees it and backs off.

    If attacted by multiple dogs (dog pack) I try to discern which is the alpha and beta dogs (leader and number two) and make my defensive moves to discourage them and if I am effective the rest will probably stop their attack.

    I have thousands of bicycle miles on and off road. City and country and, imo, city can be as bad and even worse than country. Off-roading a mountain bike in parks (city, county, state, and national) has a high rate of dog attack for me, because many people allow their dogs to run loose there (illegally). (I don't ride in dog parks) /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  3. slothluvchunk

    slothluvchunk New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2011
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    3
    Most working breeds descend from Mastiffs, including many herding breeds. Just getting away from the breed-specific ignorance that often fuels dog discussions.

    Likely - you rolling by is triggering the dog's "prey drive" and he's chasing because his brain tells you to. I'm not sure where you live, but here, even in rural areas, you simply can't have a dog that can run off your property (chasing or not) and bother other people. I mean - it happens for sure, but you at least have legal recourse.
    However, in my experience, dogs mostly chase for the fun of chasing. They're bored, and you're triggering their natural instinct (especially herding breeds), to chase something. Tail carriage is a great indicator of their intentions, though even that isn't always accurate. How do they look chasing? Running/barking, and tails wagging? Tails straight up and stiff? Hackles up?

    I won't say "I guarantee," but I'm fairly confident that with most of those dogs, you could simply stop, and they'd run up without attacking you, sniff you a bit, and lose interest.

    As was said earlier though, if you can out-run, then do so. :)

    The absolute worst thing you could do is have another dog running with you - especially any Mastiff (a "thug-breed" that will always be in the wrong, regardless of who is the agressor). I say that as the owner of a Rottweiler, and someone who knows that certain breeds will always be wrong (even though breed-specific thinking is rubbish). The last thing dogs should be encouraged to do, is "stand up" to one another, especially if your dog is the visiting team.
     
  4. frankiemuniz01

    frankiemuniz01 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2011
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    1
    The group is separating which makes it insanely more difficult to draft. coming thought the final turn, I stood up and laid in the acceleration, sprinting. One guy next to me was doing the same, and he was just a hair faster than I, but he couldn't hold it for the duration and I edged out in front. I passed two other riders who had were not sprinting. It doesn't really mean anything since I am no where near the top 20 among this 105 riders present. Yeah, there was quite the turnout for the first race of the season. End result, I am happy with my performance today. And as I said earlier, I still have all my skin.
     
  5. byeboer

    byeboer New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've had large dogs running after me and barking like crazy too. I just ride a little harder and try to avoid that route again. But what gets me, are the motorists that don't want to share the road with you. How close to the edge of the tarmac do they want to push you?


    http://www.samsproductsandservices.com/mycycling.html
     
  6. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2003
    Messages:
    10,607
    Likes Received:
    341
    This cool weather is geat because I worry about the dogs getting too hot chasing me. I don't want my favorite sprint partner to stroke on me.
    I have gotten use to some of the animals since some have chased me for years. They know my moves and I know theirs. Hate it when they bring in new dogs for re-enforcement.
     
  7. rat1972

    rat1972 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2011
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Find the worst route and get the ranger to follow you in a dog catcher You may need to hastle the ranger into this I have encounted this when riding and walking and threatened the authurities that I will carry a base ball bat to get them to do something about savage dogs running free
     
  8. ambal

    ambal Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2010
    Messages:
    895
    Likes Received:
    32
    An effective solution can be found here http://www.cyclingforums.com/forum/thread/180561/how-many-of-you-carry-a-gun-as-part-of-your-cycling-equipment
     
  9. doctorold

    doctorold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2010
    Messages:
    345
    Likes Received:
    8
    I've had three serious encounters with dogs in my three years of cycling. The first two were small dogs and I basically out ran them. Had they tried to bite, I probably would have kicked them in the jaw. Today was my third and this was a very large dog. But this dog was so large he was slow so I sprinted by untouched. But this was a new route and one I plan on doing more in the future so I am definitely looking to get some pepper spray.
     
  10. jpr95

    jpr95 Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2010
    Messages:
    870
    Likes Received:
    30
    My worst encounter with a dog while I was cycling was a near disaster, but not for the reasons you might think. I've encountered plenty of dogs, and never had a problem looking straight at them, and, in a gruff voice, firmly shout, "Go home!" several times. However, my near disaster was on the Cover Indiana Bike Tour last year, day two. I was out of water, and saw this homestead that had a replica 1950's-era gas station, and the owner was outside, so I stopped. He had a very friendly large dog roaming around, I think it was even a Rottweiler. It was friendly and playful with me, but as I was filling my water bottles, it started biting at my bicycle tires while it leaned against the shop, needless to say, I got a little excited, as after 60 miles into the wind that day, I didn't want to have to be changing dog-bit tires! Thankfully, it turned out to be a non-event, and I got to have a nice little chat with someone showing some of that famous Hoosier hospitality.

    Jason
     
  11. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2006
    Messages:
    3,477
    Likes Received:
    74
    I second the Hoosier Hospitality. In the days before readily available pepper spray, I used to carry a small spray bottle of diluted ammonia. Usually all it took was one squirt in the direction of the dog and he would usually give it up as soon as he got a whiff of it. A couple of times I had to squirt it right in their face to get them to break off the chase, and once when a fence ended rather unexpectedly and the dog didn't.
     
  12. baker3

    baker3 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    339
    Likes Received:
    1
    In the old days when we all used frame pumps, i'd just hit the dog with the pump. Now I just slow down and try to pass by without incident since i'm older and have people depending on me being alive and healthy.

    Over the years i've only ever hit one dog, result was a broken frame (seat stay and derailleur hanger) and 2 broken ribs.
     
  13. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2006
    Messages:
    3,477
    Likes Received:
    74
    I ruined a good Zefal pump on a dog, but it was better to lose the pump than get eaten alive. I was trying to pass without incident as I had just rode up out of a river gorge and couldn't outrun the mutt at that particular time. And I didn't hit him until he had hold of my sock. After that, a friend told me about the dilute ammonia and it worked like a charm. Now I mainly ride routes that I know are safe so I don't "arm" myself on them. When I go exploring though, I do carry a small canister of pepper spay as defense against the four legged and the two legged vicious animals.
     
  14. cyberlegend1994

    cyberlegend1994 Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2005
    Messages:
    1,863
    Likes Received:
    11
    Take a look at a homemade solution I made after a near altercation I had a while ago, it's on Page 2 of this thread...
     
  15. jarodwinn

    jarodwinn New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2009
    Messages:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    Try barking back at it.

    The most important thing to do when confronting ferocious dogs is to establish dominance right off the bat! You can try and stare him down, but that can be risky while riding. A previous poster mentioned buying a Newfoundland or Wolfhound... they've got it all wrong. 1) those dogs weigh a ton and 2) they'll never be able to keep up on a long ride. What you need to do is bring a cat! If you're a real weight weenie I suppose a kitten would suffice, but either way you should be able to easily outrun a cat and it's only natural for dogs to chase them down and tear them to pieces. Now I suppose if you're one of those "animal rights" people you could take the more humane road and ride with a group of slower riders but that too can be tricky. Even the slowest of riders have been know to find a higher gear when spooked; so you'll have to keep a close eye on them.
    Hope this helps.

    Best of luck /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  16. jpr95

    jpr95 Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2010
    Messages:
    870
    Likes Received:
    30
    And remember, if you're in a group, you don't have to be the fastest, you just have to be faster than the slowest!

    Jason
     
    jarodwinn likes this.
  17. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2003
    Messages:
    10,607
    Likes Received:
    341
    The Beagle that chases me has hired a team mate to help him. One blocks while the other pursues me. I also think he is doping to enhance his performance.
     
  18. Ylgner

    Ylgner New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2011
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Here in Brazil thre's a lot of dogs too, but I love it because I always have to sprint and doing it I'm training hard to races!!!
     
  19. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2006
    Messages:
    3,477
    Likes Received:
    74
    I have a route that I worked up here locally that I call my "High Intensity Workout Route". It would take me past all of the houses in the area with fast mean dogs, if I were brave enough to ride it.
     
  20. LiveStrongBOI

    LiveStrongBOI New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2011
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Usually yelling loudly will make them stop, or at least stun them for a moment (long enough to get by them). Even if you have to keep yelling, they will usually stop. It's always worked for me. Then again, I usually have my Springfield .40 cal with me too, so I guess if I absolutely had to....well, you know (definately a LAST RESORT though).
     
Loading...
Loading...