Courier Mail March 5

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by osc, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. osc

    osc New Member

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    Should be no surprise but here is a letter to the editor in yesterdays Courier Mail:

    “The story ‘Cyclist thanks her lucky stars’ (C-M March 3-4) reports yet another cyclist knocked over by a car. It reminds me of swimmers in very dangerous waters expressing surprise at a shark attack. Unless roads have clearly marked lanes they will continue to be extremely dangerous for cyclists. That is simply a fact and attempts to blame motorists for accidents involving cyclists are unjustified.”

    My reply which I would have loved to have been longer, but I'm hoping it is printed!

    So, Mr Timmermans (C-M March 5) believes that cyclists should not be on our roads and are therefore at fault when hit by cars. Does he also consider that the women attacked on Brisbane bike paths were asking for it by being on the path alone, when in fact they should be able to exercise safely in our society? Get real sir! Cyclists have a right to use the road as long as they abide by the road rules which the majority do. Accidents happen, but to imply that motorists are never to blame in accidents with cyclists shows complete ignorance. Try riding a bike, legally, on our roads and you'll understand that much of the danger is caused by impatience, lack of driving skill and a complete disregard for the rights of others. And that goes for car v car accidents as well!

    My reply which I would have loved to have been longer, but I'm hoping it is printed! No wonder it is dangerous out there when people continue to have these attitudes!

    Stewart
     
    Tags:


  2. Donga

    Donga Guest

    On Mar 6, 9:38 am, osc <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > Should be no surprise but here is a letter to the editor in yesterdays
    > Courier Mail:
    >
    > "The story 'Cyclist thanks her lucky stars' (C-M March 3-4) reports yet
    > another cyclist knocked over by a car. It reminds me of swimmers in very
    > dangerous waters expressing surprise at a shark attack. Unless roads
    > have clearly marked lanes they will continue to be extremely dangerous
    > for cyclists. That is simply a fact and attempts to blame motorists for
    > accidents involving cyclists are unjustified."
    >
    > My reply which I would have loved to have been longer, but I'm hoping
    > it is printed!
    >
    > So, Mr Timmermans (C-M March 5) believes that cyclists should not be on
    > our roads and are therefore at fault when hit by cars. Does he also
    > consider that the women attacked on Brisbane bike paths were asking for
    > it by being on the path alone, when in fact they should be able to
    > exercise safely in our society? Get real sir! Cyclists have a right to
    > use the road as long as they abide by the road rules which the majority
    > do. Accidents happen, but to imply that motorists are never to blame in
    > accidents with cyclists shows complete ignorance. Try riding a bike,
    > legally, on our roads and you'll understand that much of the danger is
    > caused by impatience, lack of driving skill and a complete disregard
    > for the rights of others. And that goes for car v car accidents as
    > well!
    >
    > My reply which I would have loved to have been longer, but I'm hoping
    > it is printed! No wonder it is dangerous out there when people continue
    > to have these attitudes!
    >
    > Stewart
    >
    > --
    > osc


    Looks good to me - good luck!

    Heck, coming down Annerley Road at 8.30 today, the number of idiot
    drivers who try to share my new bike lane! Crikey!

    Donga
     
  3. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Mar 6, 10:48 am, "Donga" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Mar 6, 9:38 am, osc <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Should be no surprise but here is a letter to the editor in yesterdays
    > > Courier Mail:

    >
    > > "The story 'Cyclist thanks her lucky stars' (C-M March 3-4) reports yet
    > > another cyclist knocked over by a car. It reminds me of swimmers in very
    > > dangerous waters expressing surprise at a shark attack. Unless roads
    > > have clearly marked lanes they will continue to be extremely dangerous
    > > for cyclists. That is simply a fact and attempts to blame motorists for
    > > accidents involving cyclists are unjustified."


    It is a fact, riding on the roads is dangerous. Riding on paths is
    dangerous, driving cars is dangerous too. Putting bike lanes on
    roads, however, may not be 'the' cure. The danger of riding on the
    road is vastly overstated.

    > > My reply which I would have loved to have been longer, but I'm hoping
    > > it is printed!

    >
    > > So, Mr Timmermans (C-M March 5) believes that cyclists should not be on
    > > our roads and are therefore at fault when hit by cars. Does he also
    > > consider that the women attacked on Brisbane bike paths were asking for
    > > it by being on the path alone, when in fact they should be able to
    > > exercise safely in our society? Get real sir! Cyclists have a right to
    > > use the road as long as they abide by the road rules which the majority
    > > do. Accidents happen, but to imply that motorists are never to blame in
    > > accidents with cyclists shows complete ignorance. Try riding a bike,
    > > legally, on our roads and you'll understand that much of the danger is
    > > caused by impatience, lack of driving skill and a complete disregard
    > > for the rights of others. And that goes for car v car accidents as
    > > well!


    You mix what we should be able to do, with what risks we knowingly
    take. The rapist argument is the classic one. A woman should be able
    to walk anywhere, but if she does, she has to accept some
    responsibiluty for the risk she takes, just as we, as cyclists, have
    to accept responsibility for the risks we take. This does *not*
    reduce the culpability of the people doing the wrong (the rapist, the
    errant or homicidal car driver etc), but it is important, all the
    same.

    >
    > > My reply which I would have loved to have been longer, but I'm hoping
    > > it is printed! No wonder it is dangerous out there when people continue
    > > to have these attitudes!


    It's not that dangerous. Really. Ride smart, and you dramatically
    reduce the risks of collision.

    >
    > > Stewart

    >
    > > --
    > > osc

    >
    > Looks good to me - good luck!
    >
    > Heck, coming down Annerley Road at 8.30 today, the number of idiot
    > drivers who try to share my new bike lane! Crikey!


    There's a very good case for bike lanes *not* being as safe as riding
    normally on the road, like every other class of vehicle. If you're not
    where drivers are looking, they won't see you. If they don't see you,
    they run into you. Drivers don't look in bike lanes, and no amount of
    politicing, education etc will change that. Ride with them, and be
    seen, and be safer.
     
  4. rooman

    rooman New Member

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    concur...
     
  5. EuanB

    EuanB New Member

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    I could have done with you over at BV forums a couple of weeks ago. Fruitlessly tried to explain to a rider who only rides Beach Road in off peak hours that riding as a part of normal traffic is not certain death.
     
  6. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Mar 6, 1:38 pm, EuanB <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > Bleve Wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > There's a very good case for bike lanes *not* being as safe as riding
    > > normally on the road, like every other class of vehicle. If you're not
    > > where drivers are looking, they won't see you. If they don't see you,
    > > they run into you. Drivers don't look in bike lanes, and no amount of
    > > politicing, education etc will change that. Ride with them, and be
    > > seen, and be safer.

    >
    > I could have done with you over at BV forums a couple of weeks ago.
    > Fruitlessly tried to explain to a rider who only rides Beach Road in
    > off peak hours that riding as a part of normal traffic is not certain
    > death.


    I'm still alive, so are you :)

    How's your leg, do we get to call you limpy?
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>,
    EuanB <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Fruitlessly tried to explain to a rider who only rides Beach Road in
    > off peak hours that riding as a part of normal traffic is not certain
    > death.


    Mind you, the way some (a minority, thankfully) ride Beach Road, they
    may have a point. I'm amazed at the number who move to the left and out
    of sight between parked cars.

    --
    Shane Stanley
     
  8. EuanB

    EuanB New Member

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    Definitely on the mend, thanks for asking. Still hurts if I do something daft like run or walk for a few hours (three's about my limit at the moment) but getting better. Bike fitness sloooooooowly coming back, haven't quite reached the stage of daily commuting yet but getting there.

    Figure I need to climb hills to speed up recovery, none on my commute so I'm going to have to do some weekend riding.
     
  9. EuanB

    EuanB New Member

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    That's pretty much the sort of riding he was advocating. Couldn't get his head around that if you ride where people can see you, i.e. on narrow lanes they actually have to /move/ to get around you, then you're less likely to get hit.

    Guess it's something you've got to experience to understand.
     
  10. PHATRS

    PHATRS Guest

    Bleve wrote:
    > There's a very good case for bike lanes *not* being as safe as riding
    > normally on the road, like every other class of vehicle. If you're not
    > where drivers are looking, they won't see you. If they don't see you,
    > they run into you. Drivers don't look in bike lanes, and no amount of
    > politicing, education etc will change that. Ride with them, and be
    > seen, and be safer.
    >


    As a driver, I always see cyclists, even if they're in the bike lane on
    St Kilda Rd in Melbourne which is the only road I usually use that has a
    bike lane.

    I think the drivers who wouldn't notice a cyclist in a bike lane are the
    same ones that wouldn't notice a 120kg+ cyclist wearing an effing bright
    orange work jacket then crash into the side of him, instead of giving
    way. (happened to a cyclist friend of mine)


    I haven't ridden since i was 16, back in 1992. I've recently pulled my
    bike out of the back of the shed in an attempt to get a bit fitter, and
    I only ride around Albert Park lake, on the road at lunch time.

    After hearing of several work colleagues getting hit by cars while
    commuting, even when they're in bike lanes, I am very reluctant to try
    riding on any road.


    --
    Ben - Wipe off 25

    "My name is Korg from planet dyslexia, your arses are fruity, take me
    to your dealer, or you will all be laminated, ." RV, melb.general
     
  11. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Mar 8, 7:55 am, PHATRS <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Bleve wrote:


    [chomp]

    > I haven't ridden since i was 16, back in 1992. I've recently pulled my
    > bike out of the back of the shed in an attempt to get a bit fitter, and
    > I only ride around Albert Park lake, on the road at lunch time.
    >
    > After hearing of several work colleagues getting hit by cars while
    > commuting, even when they're in bike lanes, I am very reluctant to try
    > riding on any road.


    This is your choice, and your loss.
     
  12. PHATRS

    PHATRS Guest

    Bleve wrote:
    > On Mar 8, 7:55 am, PHATRS <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Bleve wrote:

    >
    > [chomp]
    >
    >> I haven't ridden since i was 16, back in 1992. I've recently pulled my
    >> bike out of the back of the shed in an attempt to get a bit fitter, and
    >> I only ride around Albert Park lake, on the road at lunch time.
    >>
    >> After hearing of several work colleagues getting hit by cars while
    >> commuting, even when they're in bike lanes, I am very reluctant to try
    >> riding on any road.

    >
    > This is your choice, and your loss.
    >
    >


    I'm curious to know why you think that is my loss.

    --
    Ben - Wipe off 25

    "My name is Korg from planet dyslexia, your arses are fruity, take me
    to your dealer, or you will all be laminated, ." RV, melb.general
     
  13. DaveB

    DaveB Guest

    PHATRS wrote:

    > After hearing of several work colleagues getting hit by cars while
    > commuting, even when they're in bike lanes, I am very reluctant to try
    > riding on any road.
    >


    I've also heard of pedestrians getting hit by cars, even at pedestrian
    crossings. That's why I never cross the road. However my long walk does
    get very monotonous after a while - walk, turn left, walk, turn left ...

    daveB
     
  14. EuanB

    EuanB New Member

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    There have been several studies which show that making cycling a part of everyday life, in other words using a bicycle as a means of transport as well as recreation, reduces the chance of heart disease by 40% and that's just one of the benefits.

    By riding as little as half an hour a day you'll probably increase your active life, how old you can get before you need cared for, by 15 years.

    In the UK where a cyclist is ten times more likely to die on the road than a motorist the British Medical Journal state that the benefits of regular cycling outweigh the risks by 20:1. In Australia cycling is slightly more dangerous than driving, but by no means 10 times as dangerous.

    The risk of dying from a road accident is in fact quite small when compared to the risk of dying of a disease that can be linked to an inactive lifestyle.

    So yes, by choosing not to equip yourself with the skills and knowledge necessary to make cycling an integral part of your life, you're losing. If you're cycling round Albert Park, fair enough, but you have to find extra time in the day for that. I get my exercise riding to work where I would otherwise be standing in a train (I do miss the reading I got done on the train) or sitting behind the wheel of a car. Cycling is a much more efficient use of that particular part of the day.

    Last but by no means least, cycling for transport is a very liberating and fun experience.
     
  15. AndrewJ

    AndrewJ Guest

    On Mar 8, 9:02 am, DaveB <[email protected]> wrote:
    > PHATRS wrote:
    > > After hearing of several work colleagues getting hit by cars while
    > > commuting, even when they're in bike lanes, I am very reluctant to try
    > > riding on any road.

    >
    > I've also heard of pedestrians getting hit by cars, even at pedestrian
    > crossings. That's why I never cross the road. However my long walk does
    > get very monotonous after a while - walk, turn left, walk, turn left ...
    >
    > daveB



    I find that I'm commuting less and less on the bike. It's not just
    about the risks. It's
    about where I want to spend my time. Do I want to be riding down a
    country road or a rail
    trail? Or do I want to be spending time with your Australian suburban
    car driver?

    Let's face it. Australian car drivers have no redeeming features at
    all. If a great crack in the earth
    opened up and swallowed them, I wouldn't miss them at all. These are
    some of the most
    aggressive, rude and just plain evil people you will ever meet.
     
  16. EuanB

    EuanB New Member

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    Why not both? I have to get to work regardless and frankly cycling's the option that makes the most sense.


    I'm finding that's less and less true in the SE suburbs/CBD.
     
  17. PiledHigher

    PiledHigher Guest

    On Mar 8, 7:55 am, PHATRS <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > After hearing of several work colleagues getting hit by cars while
    > commuting, even when they're in bike lanes, I am very reluctant to try
    > riding on any road.
    >


    I've heard of several coleegues being hit by cars while driving cars
    while commuting, even when they're in car lanes, I am very reluctant
    to try driving on any road.
     
  18. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    I've never held a drivers licence or owned a car. Ditto I feel much safer either walking, using PT or out on the pedally. Although recently PT has actually been a *slower* method of transport. Ah, Melbourne ....
     
  19. AndrewJ

    AndrewJ Guest

    On Mar 8, 9:53 am, EuanB <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > AndrewJ Wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Mar 8, 9:02 am, DaveB <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > PHATRS wrote:
    > > > > After hearing of several work colleagues getting hit by cars while
    > > > > commuting, even when they're in bike lanes, I am very reluctant to

    > > try
    > > > > riding on any road.

    >
    > > > I've also heard of pedestrians getting hit by cars, even at

    > > pedestrian
    > > > crossings. That's why I never cross the road. However my long walk

    > > does
    > > > get very monotonous after a while - walk, turn left, walk, turn left

    > > ...

    >
    > > > daveB

    >
    > > I find that I'm commuting less and less on the bike. It's not just
    > > about the risks. It's
    > > about where I want to spend my time. Do I want to be riding down a
    > > country road or a rail
    > > trail? Or do I want to be spending time with your Australian suburban
    > > car driver?

    >
    > Why not both? I have to get to work regardless and frankly cycling's
    > the option that makes the most sense.
    >
    > AndrewJ Wrote:
    >
    > > Let's face it. Australian car drivers have no redeeming features at
    > > all. If a great crack in the earth
    > > opened up and swallowed them, I wouldn't miss them at all. These are
    > > some of the most
    > > aggressive, rude and just plain evil people you will ever meet.

    >
    > I'm finding that's less and less true in the SE suburbs/CBD.
    >
    > --
    > EuanB



    Ok.
    1. Take mood pill.
    2. Smile.
    3. Commute.

    Got it.
     
  20. hippy

    hippy New Member

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    Did they fix the brakes on your trains yet or what?

    On Topic Bit: Riding bikes on the road is the bestest thing in the whole world!

    hippy
    - delerious again
     
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