CR/periodical CR vs. breast cancer

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Jan 27, 2006.

  1. This review study (?) suggests that even periodical CR may prevent
    breast cancer.

    Arbor


    Obes Rev. 2006 Feb;7(1):33-47. Links
    Energy balance adiposity and breast cancer - energy restriction
    strategies for breast cancer prevention.

    Harvie M, Howell A.

    CRUK University Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital,
    Manchester, UK.

    Excess adiposity over the pre- and postmenopausal years is linked to
    risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Weight loss could potentially
    reduce risk amongst those with excess weight via beneficial effects on
    the hormonal (decreased circulating levels of oestradiol, testosterone,
    insulin) and secretory profiles of adipocytes (decreased production of
    leptin, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 6 and increased
    production of adiponectin). Only modest reductions in adipose tissue
    are achieved and sustained with current weight loss programmes, which
    makes strategies to mitigate the adverse metabolic effect of adiposity
    a priority for cancer prevention. The adverse hormonal and secretory
    effects of adipose tissue are influenced substantially by acute changes
    in energy balance prior to changes in adiposity. Human and animal
    studies have shown dietary energy restriction to bring about favourable
    changes in circulating levels of insulin, leptin, sex hormone binding
    globulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, oestradiol, testosterone,
    reactive oxygen species, and the production and secretion of locally
    acting adipokines and inflammatory cytokines, that is, increased
    adiponectin and decreased interleukin-6. Achieving and sustaining
    energy restriction remains a difficult challenge. Intermittent energy
    restriction is a potential strategy for promoting periods of energy
    restriction on a long-term basis. Animal and human data suggest that
    intermittent energy restriction may have cancer preventative effects
    beyond that of chronic energy restriction and weight loss. Intermittent
    energy restriction may be a potential strategy for the primary
    prevention of breast cancer.

    PMID: 16436101 [PubMed - in process]
     
    Tags:


  2. This review study (?) suggests that even periodical CR may prevent
    breast cancer.

    Arbor


    Obes Rev. 2006 Feb;7(1):33-47. Links
    Energy balance adiposity and breast cancer - energy restriction
    strategies for breast cancer prevention.

    Harvie M, Howell A.

    CRUK University Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital,
    Manchester, UK.

    Excess adiposity over the pre- and postmenopausal years is linked to
    risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Weight loss could potentially
    reduce risk amongst those with excess weight via beneficial effects on
    the hormonal (decreased circulating levels of oestradiol, testosterone,
    insulin) and secretory profiles of adipocytes (decreased production of
    leptin, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 6 and increased
    production of adiponectin). Only modest reductions in adipose tissue
    are achieved and sustained with current weight loss programmes, which
    makes strategies to mitigate the adverse metabolic effect of adiposity
    a priority for cancer prevention. The adverse hormonal and secretory
    effects of adipose tissue are influenced substantially by acute changes
    in energy balance prior to changes in adiposity. Human and animal
    studies have shown dietary energy restriction to bring about favourable
    changes in circulating levels of insulin, leptin, sex hormone binding
    globulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, oestradiol, testosterone,
    reactive oxygen species, and the production and secretion of locally
    acting adipokines and inflammatory cytokines, that is, increased
    adiponectin and decreased interleukin-6. Achieving and sustaining
    energy restriction remains a difficult challenge. Intermittent energy
    restriction is a potential strategy for promoting periods of energy
    restriction on a long-term basis. Animal and human data suggest that
    intermittent energy restriction may have cancer preventative effects
    beyond that of chronic energy restriction and weight loss. Intermittent
    energy restriction may be a potential strategy for the primary
    prevention of breast cancer.

    PMID: 16436101 [PubMed - in process]
     
  3. M Dunne

    M Dunne Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Intermittent energy
    > restriction is a potential strategy for promoting periods of energy
    > restriction on a long-term basis. Animal and human data suggest that
    > intermittent energy restriction may have cancer preventative effects
    > beyond that of chronic energy restriction and weight loss. Intermittent
    > energy restriction may be a potential strategy for the primary
    > prevention of breast cancer.


    Aren't there people out there who practise 'Every Other Day' nutrition --
    i.e. not worrying about 'overall' CR, but just *not eating* on *every second
    day*...?

    Maybe someone has a good link about this...? It might be the way to go...!

    M. D.
     
  4. You asked:
    >Aren't there people out there who practise 'Every Other Day' nutrition --
    >i.e. not worrying about 'overall' CR, but just *not eating* on *every second
    >day*...?


    Yes there are. Prince Charles is one of them, so is Dr. Dean Edell -
    the well-known host of a well-known health radio talk show, myself, and
    other folks whose posts I have read here and on the 2 newsgroups linked
    below. Instead of fasting EOD (every other day) they eat 1 meal/day or
    consume their entire daily caloric intake in an eating-window of 4-6
    hours.
    Then there are people who periodically practice a complete fasting for
    few days and others that do that but also add fresh juices. I think
    that there is one such newsgroup among the many Yahoo's newsgroups
    but you need to search for it if interested.
    Arbor

    These 2 groups require a membership but you can read their archives as
    a guest.
    1. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/fasting/
    2. http://www.calorierestriction.org/ [the address of the archives of
    that group is on #3]
    3. http://lists.calorierestriction.org/archives/crsociety.html
     
Loading...