cracked headset



Status
Not open for further replies.
M

Martin Family

Guest
I noticed as I got the bike out yesterday that the headset seemed a bit stiff. Thought nothing of it
and resolved to give it some TLC tonight.

Opened it up (stronglight A something (A10, A9? nice roller bearing one)) and dicovered the bottom
race was a little grungy. Having removed the forks I then discovered that the bearing race support
on the fork crown has cracked right across. That is why it was allowing so much water/gunge ingress.
I've no worries about continuing to use it for the present (failure would not be catastrophic in
terms of the integrity of the bike, just give rise to poor performance at the front end with
sufficient warning to be able to get home.)

So the arguement goes something like this:

new headset and respray for frame (needs it after 14 years and 20+ thousand miles) 150-200 GBP
replacement of any part of the drivetrain would require major expenditure as it is all vintage
1989/90 (Shimano Sante and Ultegra) and I would want to move to STI and a front triple of the order
of 3-400 GBP.

I should get a substantial sum of money for some extra-curricular work in the spring. Its my
birthday in the summer.

I have been following the thread on Audax/winter training bikes with great interest :)

It will be a shame to retire a faithful old friend but times change. It will be good to get
something where the gears are right for my no longer spring chicken body (I used to ride around the
North Downs with a 65" bottom gear [42x18]. Now I have something far gentler [39x24] and would like
gentler still and the option to not be covered in mud at the end of the day.)

Off the shelf bikes seem to start around 700. I may well be tempted to go for a custom frame. Any
experience on the merits of a personally designed frame? Is it worth it? Doing so would add several
hundred pounds to the price of the bike.

..d
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Martin Family wrote:

> It will be a shame to retire a faithful old friend but times change. It will be good to get
> something where the gears are right for my no longer spring chicken body (I used to ride around
> the North Downs with a 65" bottom gear [42x18]. Now I have something far gentler [39x24] and would
> like gentler still and the option to not be covered in mud at the end of the day.)
>
> Off the shelf bikes seem to start around 700. I may well be tempted to go for a custom frame. Any
> experience on the merits of a personally designed frame? Is it worth it? Doing so would add
> several hundred pounds to the price of the bike.

Recumbent with a Rohloff will have all the gears you want and practically no drivetrain maintenance
except for cleaning the chain. And it will be an order of magnitude more comfortable than any custom
upright frame, and you can put mudguards and luggage racks on it and still have better aerodynamics
than an upright racer. Why perch on a pole when you can sit in a chair?

More expensive, of course, and a lot more expensive still if you get a Rohloff on it too. Not as
great at climbing, but they get there and then they're amazing going down the other side, and the
right models will carry luggage better as well. Get in touch if you fancy a go on the
Streetmachine (Roos was planning to ride it in this morning, it's probably parked outside the Jam
Factory for a look).

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
D

David Martin

Guest
On 9/2/04 9:22 am, in article [email protected], "Peter Clinch"
<[email protected]> wrote:

> Martin Family wrote:
>
>> It will be a shame to retire a faithful old friend but times change. It will be good to get
>> something where the gears are right for my no longer spring chicken body (I used to ride around
>> the North Downs with a 65" bottom gear [42x18]. Now I have something far gentler [39x24] and
>> would like gentler still and the option to not be covered in mud at the end of the day.)
>>
>> Off the shelf bikes seem to start around 700. I may well be tempted to go for a custom frame. Any
>> experience on the merits of a personally designed frame? Is it worth it? Doing so would add
>> several hundred pounds to the price of the bike.
>
> Recumbent with a Rohloff will have all the gears you want and practically no drivetrain
> maintenance except for cleaning the chain. And it will be an order of magnitude more comfortable
> than any custom upright frame, and you can put mudguards and luggage racks on it and still have
> better aerodynamics than an upright racer. Why perch on a pole when you can sit in a chair?

Unfortunately even with Dundee's low cost of living, a recumbent will more than exceed the
available budget. I can persuade SWMBO to let me replace the road bike, but going a step up (or
should that be a sit down) to a recumbent will be difficult. (it also won't hang in the garage,
unlike the other bikes)

> More expensive, of course, and a lot more expensive still if you get a Rohloff on it too. Not as
> great at climbing, but they get there and then they're amazing going down the other side, and the
> right models will carry luggage better as well.

The limiting factor on the downhills isn't speed, it's all the mud/ice onteh road.

> Get in touch if you fancy a go on the Streetmachine (Roos was planning to ride it in this morning,
> it's probably parked outside the Jam Factory for a look).

I'll definitely take you up on it at some point. The last time I rode a recumbent was on the
waterfront in Oslo, dodging the tram tracks. The pedals were about an inch too far away from me for
comfort, but it was good fun.

I'm saving the 'I want a recumbent' for my 40th..

..d
 
Status
Not open for further replies.