Crank Bros.

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by J Switzer, Mar 1, 2004.

  1. J Switzer

    J Switzer Guest

    I am in the process of purchasing a new bike, and I think I am going clipless. I picked up some
    Pearl Izumi Bolder shoes, and I thinking about grabbing some Crank Bros. Mallet pedals this week.
    Since I am new to the clipless riding - a platform/clip hybrid seems like a good start. Does anybody
    have any experience with these pedals? I would like to read some cheers or jeers on the Crank Bros.
    Oh - BTW I am open to any other brand of pedal you might recommend.

    Thanks

    J
     
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  2. ireman_1

    ireman_1 New Member

    Joined:
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    >Originally posted by J Switzer [/i]
    >I am in the process of purchasing a new bike, and I think I am >going clipless. I picked up some
    >Pearl Izumi Bolder shoes, and I thinking about grabbing some >Crank Bros. Mallet pedals this week.
    >Since I am new to the clipless riding - a platform/clip hybrid >seems like a good start. Does anybody
    >have any experience with these pedals? I would like to read >some cheers or jeers on the Crank Bros.
    >Oh - BTW I am open to any other brand of pedal you might >recommend.

    >Thanks

    >J


    I've been abusing my "new" (two months?) Crank brother mallets for a few rides and have really appreciated their "mud proof" design up here in the land of eternal wettness. They start a bit tight, but break-in quickly and have worked flawlessly since that first ride. I love them compared to the last pair of clip-in pedals I had (shimano). I figured I'd run them with the larger of the two traction plates they come with, but have found the shorter of the two is more than plenty for most of the time. You should enjoy them. Have fun.

    K.
     
  3. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "J Switzer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am in the process of purchasing a new bike, and I think I am going clipless. I picked up some
    > Pearl Izumi Bolder shoes, and I thinking about grabbing some Crank Bros. Mallet pedals this week.
    > Since I am new to the clipless riding - a platform/clip hybrid seems like a good start. Does
    > anybody have any experience with these pedals? I would like to read some cheers or jeers on the
    > Crank Bros. Oh - BTW I am open to any other brand
    of
    > pedal you might recommend.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > J

    I run regular 'beaters, stainless steel, not the semi-platform-dealies. While I think they are the
    best pedal available for XC riding, they're not ideal for a beginner...you can't adjust the spring
    tension to "pull out" in an emergency, the release angle is pretty steep, and clipping in has some
    close tolerances as well. These aren't problems that an experienced clipless rider minds, but
    rookies may not be best suited for 'beaters. I say get a cheap, used pair of SPD compatibles (see
    what your LBS has in a parts bin or hit up Ebay) and get used to them, then switch to 'beaters, the
    best pedal on earth.

    Why I love beaters - best mud shedding around, easy maintenance, simple, smart. Less important -
    they look cool. Much less important - they're very lightweight.

    If you go all platform, I dig Ringle ZuZus. For what that's worth.

    Chris
     
  4. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    Chris wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > I run regular 'beaters, stainless steel, not the semi-platform-dealies. While I think they are the
    > best pedal available for XC riding, they're not ideal for a beginner...you can't adjust the spring
    > tension to "pull out" in an emergency, the release angle is pretty steep, and clipping in has some
    > close tolerances as well. These aren't problems that an experienced clipless rider minds, but
    > rookies may not be best suited for 'beaters. I say get a cheap, used pair of SPD compatibles (see
    > what your LBS has in a parts bin or hit up Ebay) and get used to them, then switch to 'beaters,
    > the best pedal on earth.
    >

    How can they be the best if they're not adjustable? One size does not fit all.

    Greg
     
  5. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "G.T." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > >
    >
    > How can they be the best if they're not adjustable? One size does not fit
    all.
    >
    > Greg
    >

    Because nothing's perfect: I think the 'beaters are just closer than everything else.

    Chris
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, getnews1 @dslextreme.com says...
    > Chris wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > I run regular 'beaters, stainless steel, not the semi-platform-dealies. While I think they are
    > > the best pedal available for XC riding, they're not ideal for a beginner...you can't adjust the
    > > spring tension to "pull out" in an emergency, the release angle is pretty steep, and clipping in
    > > has some close tolerances as well. These aren't problems that an experienced clipless rider
    > > minds, but rookies may not be best suited for 'beaters. I say get a cheap, used pair of SPD
    > > compatibles (see what your LBS has in a parts bin or hit up Ebay) and get used to them, then
    > > switch to 'beaters, the best pedal on earth.
    > >
    >
    > How can they be the best if they're not adjustable? One size does not fit all.
    >
    > Greg
    >
    >

    There's no need to have adjustable spring tension when you have 100% free float. It's only $himano
    pedals that have you engaging the mechanism from the first degree of movement.
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  7. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    "Chris Phillipo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, getnews1 @dslextreme.com says...
    > > Chris wrote:
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > I run regular 'beaters, stainless steel, not the
    semi-platform-dealies.
    > > > While I think they are the best pedal available for XC riding, they're
    not
    > > > ideal for a beginner...you can't adjust the spring tension to "pull
    out" in
    > > > an emergency, the release angle is pretty steep, and clipping in has
    some
    > > > close tolerances as well. These aren't problems that an experienced clipless rider minds, but
    > > > rookies may not be best suited for 'beaters.
    I
    > > > say get a cheap, used pair of SPD compatibles (see what your LBS has
    in a
    > > > parts bin or hit up Ebay) and get used to them, then switch to
    'beaters, the
    > > > best pedal on earth.
    > > >
    > >
    > > How can they be the best if they're not adjustable? One size does not
    fit all.
    > >
    > > Greg
    > >
    > >
    >
    > There's no need to have adjustable spring tension when you have 100% free float. It's only $himano
    > pedals that have you engaging the mechanism from the first degree of movement.

    Similar to Times? If so, then I wouldn't consider it "100% free float".

    Greg
     
  8. Jonesy

    Jonesy Guest

    "J Switzer" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am in the process of purchasing a new bike, and I think I am going clipless. I picked up some
    > Pearl Izumi Bolder shoes, and I thinking about grabbing some Crank Bros. Mallet pedals this week.
    > Since I am new to the clipless riding - a platform/clip hybrid seems like a good start. Does
    > anybody have any experience with these pedals? I would like to read some cheers or jeers on the
    > Crank Bros. Oh - BTW I am open to any other brand of pedal you might recommend.

    Picked up the Mallets last summer. What I really like is that I can jump on the bike and ride a new,
    never-seen section not-clipped-in, so I can bail ASAP, if required. Or so that I can ride the 'hood
    in whatever shoes I got going.

    My PD-545s were OK in that regard as well, but they had no float, and they got crapped up too
    easily. In addition, they were heavy. Nice when you rebound the pedal cage off of rocks, but sucky
    when you're going uphill. :)

    While I was leery of the lack of adjustment inherent in the design, I found they loosened up pretty
    well after a few rides, and have maintained a decent tension. Luck? Maybe, but I sure like them
    better than the fiddly Shimano stuff.

    I have not tried any other type of clipless, so I do not know how these compare to Speedplay or
    other clipless types.

    HTH,
    --
    Jonesy
     
  9. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    > I am in the process of purchasing a new bike, and I think I am going clipless. I picked up some
    > Pearl Izumi Bolder shoes, and I thinking
    about
    > grabbing some Crank Bros. Mallet pedals this week. Since I am new to
    the
    > clipless riding - a platform/clip hybrid seems like a good start.
    Does
    > anybody have any experience with these pedals? I would like to read
    some
    > cheers or jeers on the Crank Bros. Oh - BTW I am open to any other
    brand of
    > pedal you might recommend.

    My first clipless pedal was the Time ATAC Alium. I had been riding mountain bikes for about 3 months
    prior to going to clipless, and I had no problems with these pedals. In fact, after I got used to
    riding with them I could never go back to regular platform pedals. When the eggbeaters came out a
    couple years ago, I decided to give them a try. I immediately was hooked on them. They work very
    similar to Time pedals, but they have a lighter action to them. They are easier to get into and out
    of due to lighter spring tension and the 4-sided engagement...not to mention the pedal itself weighs
    half as much.

    You shouldn't have any problems going with the eggbeater as your first pedal if you are comfortable
    on your bike. Just give yourself ample time to adjust to riding clipless before trying any difficult
    trails. Here is the FAQ if you want some helpful information... just skip all the confusing
    technical sections...

    http://members.cox.net/jhnmorgan/mtb/CliplessFAQ.txt

    -John Morgan
     
  10. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    > > There's no need to have adjustable spring tension when you have
    100%
    > > free float. It's only $himano pedals that have you engaging the mechanism from the first degree
    > > of movement.
    >
    > Similar to Times? If so, then I wouldn't consider it "100% free
    float".
    >
    > Greg

    I would say a closer pedal to "100% free float" would be Speedplay... but eggbeaters do have a good
    bit of float before spring tension kicks in, similar to Time. With most Shimano pedals, the spring
    tension begins on the cleat in the first degree of angular cleat movement. The idea behind Time and
    Eggbeater pedals is you get 6 deg. of float with no tension on the cleat, then you get progressive
    tension that ramps up as angular rotation increases. Thus, you always have a comfortable amount of
    tension keeping your foot from releasing with no need for manual spring adjustment. Time calls this
    Auto Tension Adjustment Concept.

    -John Morgan
     
  11. By the way has anyone see the Time ATAC vs. Crano Bros. prices this year? The price of the new style
    ATACs almost doubled while the Crank Bros. pedals went down. Mallet C will be replacing my ATACs
    which met with an unfortunate blowtorch incident in the fall.

    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  12. J Switzer

    J Switzer Guest

    Thanks for the imput - John, great FAQ very imformative. J
     
  13. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    > By the way has anyone see the Time ATAC vs. Crano Bros. prices this year? The price of the new
    > style ATACs almost doubled while the
    Crank
    > Bros. pedals went down. Mallet C will be replacing my ATACs which
    met
    > with an unfortunate blowtorch incident in the fall.

    The new Time XS look very interesting... I would love to hear reports from anyone on this NG who has
    used them.

    From observation, they have significantly reduced the weight, improved the manufacture quality and
    materials (just look at those beautifully crafted square springs...), and added a spring adjustment
    screw for fine tuning the feel of the spring tension.

    -John Morgan
     
  14. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    John Morgan wrote:
    >>>There's no need to have adjustable spring tension when you have
    >
    > 100%
    >
    >>>free float. It's only $himano pedals that have you engaging the mechanism from the first degree
    >>>of movement.
    >>
    >>Similar to Times? If so, then I wouldn't consider it "100% free
    >
    > float".
    >
    >>Greg
    >
    >
    > I would say a closer pedal to "100% free float" would be Speedplay... but eggbeaters do have a
    > good bit of float before spring tension kicks in, similar to Time.

    I really screwed that up. I meant that even with the Times that I've tried there is tension that
    needs to be overcome to clip out. I haven't tried Crank's so am trying to get a comparison to the
    Times. I like Shimanos because if I know I'm going to be riding cliffside trails I can adjust them
    to where it takes nothing to clip out. The same couldn't be said for the Times I tried.

    Greg
     
  15. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    > > I would say a closer pedal to "100% free float" would be
    Speedplay...
    > > but eggbeaters do have a good bit of float before spring tension
    kicks
    > > in, similar to Time.
    >
    > I really screwed that up. I meant that even with the Times that
    I've tried
    > there is tension that needs to be overcome to clip out. I haven't
    tried
    > Crank's so am trying to get a comparison to the Times. I like
    Shimanos
    > because if I know I'm going to be riding cliffside trails I can
    adjust them
    > to where it takes nothing to clip out. The same couldn't be said
    for the
    > Times I tried.

    True. If you want a pedal that is quick in or out, Shimano is still your pedal. Not only can you
    adjust the tension to be very weak, but Shimanos also have a smaller release angle... about 10
    degrees or so, compared to 15 or 20 (adjustable) on the eggbeaters. Time pedals can be switched
    between 13 or 17 degrees for a release angle... still pretty quick if you ask me. A few years back,
    Time used to go with the 15/20 setup as well, but they realized a lot of people were grinding down
    the cleats to make them easier to get out of...

    -John Morgan
     
  16. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    > I really screwed that up. I meant that even with the Times that
    I've tried
    > there is tension that needs to be overcome to clip out. I haven't
    tried
    > Crank's so am trying to get a comparison to the Times.

    I can offer a good comparison... actually I try to cover that in the FAQ too, but here you go:

    The Eggbeaters have a lighter action (especially if you're comparing them to an out-of-the-box Time
    pedal). When you engage the pedal, it's a light click instead of a resounding *SNAP!* Although Times
    are weighted to be at a good angle to slide right into, the Eggbeaters are easier still because of
    the 4-sided entry, you just step down on the pedal. You never need to adjust the angle of the pedal
    with your foot to get in. For me, it's also important that Eggbeaters are lighter weight than Times,
    even lighter than the new Time XS.

    And finally, the main technical difference between the two is that Time pedals allow 3mm of lateral
    float, which means you can wiggle the cleat side to side within the springs. To some this may feel
    sloppy, but what that supposedly does, is allow your leg to move in a more natural motion when
    pedalling. Eggbeaters have no lateral float.

    If you want your foot to be solidly locked in (or have the option to allow your foot extremely easy
    release) then stick with Shimanos. The Times and Eggbeaters allow a lot more free movement (which I
    find to be quite comfortable), and keep your foot in by simply increasing the release angle a bit.

    -John Morgan
     
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