Crank Brothers Alloy Pump

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Wasatch5k, Mar 9, 2005.

  1. Wasatch5k

    Wasatch5k Guest

    Bought a new Crank Brothers Alloy Pump last week. Used it for the first time
    today- What a PITA!! It would not pump past 80psi without the head popping
    off the presta valve (from the pressure) I flipped the head the right way to
    lock it down, but it just kept popping off! It seems the head does not grip
    the valve tight enough yet the pump is rated at 120psi -- any suggestions?

    Thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. I too bought one and threw it away after haveing nothing but difficulty
    getting it to pump up a road tire to 95 lbs. P.O.S in all respects.
    Bought a Topeak road morph and now have one on each of my bikes.
     
  3. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Wed, 9 Mar 2005 20:15:23 -0700, "Wasatch5k" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Bought a new Crank Brothers Alloy Pump last week. Used it for the first time
    >today- What a PITA!! It would not pump past 80psi without the head popping
    >off the presta valve (from the pressure) I flipped the head the right way to
    >lock it down, but it just kept popping off! It seems the head does not grip
    >the valve tight enough yet the pump is rated at 120psi -- any suggestions?


    Yeah, this is generic, but probably applies to this pump like it does every
    other one I've ever seen. Unscrew the threaded cap that goes over the head. pull
    out the rubber doughnut and the little plastice doowitz behind it. You'll see
    the doughnut has a big hole side and a small hole side. Put the plastic widget
    back in with the raised portion away from the opening. Then put the doughnut
    back in with the small opening facing out. It's that last line that's important.

    If your pump head was already assembled that way then you've got a crap pump.

    Ron
     
  4. RonSonic wrote:
    > On Wed, 9 Mar 2005 20:15:23 -0700, "Wasatch5k" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Bought a new Crank Brothers Alloy Pump last week. Used it for the
    >> first time today- What a PITA!! It would not pump past 80psi without
    >> the head popping off the presta valve (from the pressure) I flipped
    >> the head the right way to lock it down, but it just kept popping
    >> off! It seems the head does not grip the valve tight enough yet the
    >> pump is rated at 120psi -- any suggestions?

    >
    > Yeah, this is generic, but probably applies to this pump like it does
    > every other one I've ever seen. Unscrew the threaded cap that goes
    > over the head. pull out the rubber doughnut and the little plastice
    > doowitz behind it. You'll see the doughnut has a big hole side and a
    > small hole side. Put the plastic widget back in with the raised
    > portion away from the opening. Then put the doughnut back in with the
    > small opening facing out. It's that last line that's important.
    >
    > If your pump head was already assembled that way then you've got a
    > crap pump.
    >
    > Ron


    You may want to state the reason for this:
    The heads are setup for Schrader valves initially. Flipping the rubber
    washer-grommet inside places the Presta side out, which has more rubber, and
    grips the stem better. Virtually all mini pumps are like this.
    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  5. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    I doubt whether a pump set up for Shraeder stems would hold 2 psi on a
    Presta--his pops of at about 80.
     
  6. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 16:14:41 GMT, "Phil, Squid-in-Training"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >RonSonic wrote:
    >> On Wed, 9 Mar 2005 20:15:23 -0700, "Wasatch5k" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Bought a new Crank Brothers Alloy Pump last week. Used it for the
    >>> first time today- What a PITA!! It would not pump past 80psi without
    >>> the head popping off the presta valve (from the pressure) I flipped
    >>> the head the right way to lock it down, but it just kept popping
    >>> off! It seems the head does not grip the valve tight enough yet the
    >>> pump is rated at 120psi -- any suggestions?

    >>
    >> Yeah, this is generic, but probably applies to this pump like it does
    >> every other one I've ever seen. Unscrew the threaded cap that goes
    >> over the head. pull out the rubber doughnut and the little plastice
    >> doowitz behind it. You'll see the doughnut has a big hole side and a
    >> small hole side. Put the plastic widget back in with the raised
    >> portion away from the opening. Then put the doughnut back in with the
    >> small opening facing out. It's that last line that's important.
    >>
    >> If your pump head was already assembled that way then you've got a
    >> crap pump.
    >>
    >> Ron

    >
    >You may want to state the reason for this:
    >The heads are setup for Schrader valves initially. Flipping the rubber
    >washer-grommet inside places the Presta side out, which has more rubber, and
    >grips the stem better. Virtually all mini pumps are like this.


    Thanks Phil. I didn't know it was a mini. Guess the default for them would be
    schrader valves.

    Ron
     
  7. Possibly tighten the cap over the gasket to decrease the size of the
    gasket hole (as with a silca floor pump)?

    I haven't fully come to terms with my Crank Bros. alloy pump yet either
    (but it got 5 stars from Mountain Bike Action mag so its gotta be good
    ;-)). In fact, I have yet to put it into action in a road situation as
    I carry CO2 and the pump is a backup carried only on expedition-length
    rides.

    The pump definitely looks cool - did you mount the funky bracket on
    your bike? I have taken to putting mine in my camelbak (if I am using
    it) or in a jersey pocket so as to not ruin the aesthetics of the bike.


    App
     
  8. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 17:13:02 GMT, "Leo Lichtman" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I doubt whether a pump set up for Shraeder stems would hold 2 psi on a
    >Presta--his pops of at about 80.



    Sure, you shove it on there and clamp and you'll get some air in there.

    Ron
     
  9. Wasatch5k

    Wasatch5k Guest

    RonSonic wrote:
    > Yeah, this is generic, but probably applies to this pump like it does every
    > other one I've ever seen. Unscrew the threaded cap that goes over the head. pull
    > out the rubber doughnut and the little plastice doowitz behind it. You'll see
    > the doughnut has a big hole side and a small hole side. Put the plastic widget
    > back in with the raised portion away from the opening. Then put the doughnut
    > back in with the small opening facing out. It's that last line that's important.
    >
    > If your pump head was already assembled that way then you've got a crap pump.
    >
    > Ron
    >

    Not the problem--

    http://tinyurl.com/6j4gu

    The pump has two heads -- one for each type of valve.

    --

    Let the bridges I burn light my way...
     
  10. Wasatch5k

    Wasatch5k Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Possibly tighten the cap over the gasket to decrease the size of the
    > gasket hole (as with a silca floor pump)?
    >
    > I haven't fully come to terms with my Crank Bros. alloy pump yet either
    > (but it got 5 stars from Mountain Bike Action mag so its gotta be good
    > ;-)). In fact, I have yet to put it into action in a road situation as
    > I carry CO2 and the pump is a backup carried only on expedition-length
    > rides.
    >
    > The pump definitely looks cool - did you mount the funky bracket on
    > your bike? I have taken to putting mine in my camelbak (if I am using
    > it) or in a jersey pocket so as to not ruin the aesthetics of the bike.
    >
    >
    > App
    >

    I put mine in my camelback also, I don't like mounting things to my
    frame with zip ties and double sided tape. Your right though, the pump
    looks cool.

    You best try pumping up your road tires before relying on it as backup...

    Nate
    --

    Let the bridges I burn light my way...
     
  11. biketoolsect.com offers a german locking pump head for $4
    and valve tools: Am-flo
     
  12. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 14:34:03 -0700, Wasatch5k <[email protected]> wrote:

    >RonSonic wrote:
    >> Yeah, this is generic, but probably applies to this pump like it does every
    >> other one I've ever seen. Unscrew the threaded cap that goes over the head. pull
    >> out the rubber doughnut and the little plastice doowitz behind it. You'll see
    >> the doughnut has a big hole side and a small hole side. Put the plastic widget
    >> back in with the raised portion away from the opening. Then put the doughnut
    >> back in with the small opening facing out. It's that last line that's important.
    >>
    >> If your pump head was already assembled that way then you've got a crap pump.
    >>
    >> Ron
    >>

    >Not the problem--
    >
    >http://tinyurl.com/6j4gu
    >
    >The pump has two heads -- one for each type of valve.


    Then jump to the last line.

    It looks like they just added "features" rather than worrying about having the
    thing perform the simple basic function of inserting pressurized air into an
    innertube. Dual whatsits and stereo heads and blah.

    I usually reject added features beyond the basics. So few things function all
    that well on a basic level I don't want to see any additional failure modes.

    Let me know if you find a decent mini-pump.

    Ron
     
  13. Wasatch5k

    Wasatch5k Guest

    RonSonic wrote:
    > Then jump to the last line.
    >
    > It looks like they just added "features" rather than worrying about having the
    > thing perform the simple basic function of inserting pressurized air into an
    > innertube. Dual whatsits and stereo heads and blah.
    >
    > I usually reject added features beyond the basics. So few things function all
    > that well on a basic level I don't want to see any additional failure modes.
    >
    > Let me know if you find a decent mini-pump.
    >
    > Ron
    >


    Crank brother stuff is *usually* solid, and it comes with a lifetime
    warranty. Anyways, I e-mailed Crank Brothers with my problem. We will
    see if they do the right thing.
    --

    Let the bridges I burn light my way...
     
  14. On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 14:34:03 -0700, Wasatch5k
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >RonSonic wrote:
    >> Yeah, this is generic, but probably applies to this pump like it does every
    >> other one I've ever seen. Unscrew the threaded cap that goes over the head. pull
    >> out the rubber doughnut and the little plastice doowitz behind it. You'll see
    >> the doughnut has a big hole side and a small hole side. Put the plastic widget
    >> back in with the raised portion away from the opening. Then put the doughnut
    >> back in with the small opening facing out. It's that last line that's important.
    >>
    >> If your pump head was already assembled that way then you've got a crap pump.
    >>
    >> Ron
    >>

    >Not the problem--
    >
    >http://tinyurl.com/6j4gu
    >
    >The pump has two heads -- one for each type of valve.


    Dear Wasatch,

    The catalogue number for the pump in that link does not
    inspire confidence:

    CRA-PA-B

    I hope that the two heads are not labeled A and B.

    Carl Fogel
     
  15. > You best try pumping up your road tires before relying on it as
    backup...
    >
    > Nate
    > --
    >
    > Let the bridges I burn light my way...


    Actually have tried it - to about 80 psi - just got tired of grunting
    away. Seemed to work about as well as any mini-pump in terms of
    effort. It has those high volume / high pressure mode settings. High
    volume is ok, and the high pressure setting reduces effort (which is
    necessary about 40-60 psi) but that last 50 or so psi are a bit of a
    pain...

    Better than hoofing it though. Course, a decent frame pump works much
    better and efficiently. And it doesn't run out of co2.

    But I'm so lazy...

    App
     
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