Creatine

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Keith Alexander®, Sep 30, 2004.

  1. Tags:


  2. Keith Alexander® wrote:

    > I see no traffic on this.
    >
    > Is it a banned substance?


    No, but the nandrolone you (allegedly) have to take in combination for
    it to do any good IS a banned substance...
     
  3. warren

    warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Stewart Fleming
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Keith Alexander® wrote:
    >
    > > I see no traffic on this.
    > >
    > > Is it a banned substance?

    >
    > No, but the nandrolone you (allegedly) have to take in combination for
    > it to do any good IS a banned substance...


    I assume you're joking. If you're not, the possible benefits of
    creatine have virtually nothing to do with any benefit from nandralone
    or any other anabolic steroid.

    -WG
     
  4. warren wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Stewart Fleming
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Keith Alexander® wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I see no traffic on this.
    >>>
    >>>Is it a banned substance?

    >>
    >>No, but the nandrolone you (allegedly) have to take in combination for
    >>it to do any good IS a banned substance...

    >
    >
    > I assume you're joking. If you're not, the possible benefits of
    > creatine have virtually nothing to do with any benefit from nandralone
    > or any other anabolic steroid.


    Kinda...my original comment was a dig at some British sprinters who
    blamed nandrolone tests on contaminated supplements, including creatine:

    "Another possible explanation, often cited by athletes caught with
    positive tests, is that the nandrolone in their system arose from the
    use of protein milkshakes and the amino acid creatine, which are
    perfectly legal and used as dietary supplements to increase weight. But
    it is difficult to see how nandrolone could be produced from the benign
    components of these substances, unless they had been accidentally or
    deliberately contaminated. Subsequent testing, however, ruled out any
    deliberate contamination.

    A much more likely theory has recently emerged from the results of a
    preliminary investigation at Aberdeen University. The findings are that
    dietary supplements themselves are harmless and produce no increased
    levels of nandrolone. Exercise alone, too, doesn't cause any problems.
    But a combination of both dietary supplements (none of which contain a
    banned substance) and exercise, can result in a positive nandrolone
    test. The reason for this is still unclear, but one theory is that there
    is a link between heavy training, the dehydration that goes with it, and
    their effects upon the components of high protein diets. Until more work
    is done, however, the 'nandrolone mystery' goes on..."
    http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/motm/nandrolone/nandh.htm
     
  5. On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic steroid.


    *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    a creatine routine during the racing season?

    ---
    k e i t h a l e x a n d e r
    http://www.nootrope.net
    http://www.modernamerican.com
    aim: nootrope9 element

    - - e n d t r a n s m i s s i o n - -
     
  6. warren

    warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Keith
    Alexander® <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:

    > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    > >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic steroid.

    >
    > *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    > a creatine routine during the racing season?


    What is the risk? Creatine isn't a banned substance. You'll find
    significant amounts of it in fish and meat.

    -WG
     
  7. warren

    warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Stewart Fleming
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > warren wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, Stewart Fleming
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>Keith Alexander® wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>I see no traffic on this.
    > >>>
    > >>>Is it a banned substance?
    > >>
    > >>No, but the nandrolone you (allegedly) have to take in combination for
    > >>it to do any good IS a banned substance...

    > >
    > >
    > > I assume you're joking. If you're not, the possible benefits of
    > > creatine have virtually nothing to do with any benefit from nandralone
    > > or any other anabolic steroid.

    >
    > Kinda...my original comment was a dig at some British sprinters who
    > blamed nandrolone tests on contaminated supplements, including creatine:
    >
    > "Another possible explanation, often cited by athletes caught with
    > positive tests, is that the nandrolone in their system arose from the
    > use of protein milkshakes and the amino acid creatine, which are
    > perfectly legal and used as dietary supplements to increase weight. But
    > it is difficult to see how nandrolone could be produced from the benign
    > components of these substances, unless they had been accidentally or
    > deliberately contaminated. Subsequent testing, however, ruled out any
    > deliberate contamination.
    >
    > A much more likely theory has recently emerged from the results of a
    > preliminary investigation at Aberdeen University. The findings are that
    > dietary supplements themselves are harmless and produce no increased
    > levels of nandrolone. Exercise alone, too, doesn't cause any problems.
    > But a combination of both dietary supplements (none of which contain a
    > banned substance) and exercise, can result in a positive nandrolone
    > test. The reason for this is still unclear, but one theory is that there
    > is a link between heavy training, the dehydration that goes with it, and
    > their effects upon the components of high protein diets. Until more work
    > is done, however, the 'nandrolone mystery' goes on..."
    > http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/motm/nandrolone/nandh.htm


    That's quite a theory. What I read, and think is more plausible is that
    companies manufacturing supplements also processed the androstenedione
    supplements that Mark McGuire became famous for. The vestibules or
    containers of "legal" supplements were contaminated by leftovers from
    making andro.

    It was several months after the rush to try andro that it was
    discovered (or at least became public knowledge) that use of andro will
    cause a positive test for nandrolone, and to make it worse, the test
    could find traces of nandro for up to a year after it was ingested.

    So you had a whole bunch of athletes who either ate stuff that was
    contaminated by andro and/or a lot of athletes who tried andro and
    didn't know it was banned (or would be banned) at the time, and during
    the following year lots of them got nabbed by a test.

    -WG
     
  8. Andy Coggan

    Andy Coggan Guest

    "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:300920041901519224%[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Keith
    > Alexander® <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:
    >
    > > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    > > >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic steroid.

    > >
    > > *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    > > a creatine routine during the racing season?

    >
    > What is the risk? Creatine isn't a banned substance. You'll find
    > significant amounts of it in fish and meat.


    Not to mention the fact that your body makes 1-1.5 g/d (if you don't
    otherwise eat/ingest much, that is).

    That said, if there were a chance that I'd be drug-tested, I wouldn't take
    creatine, for fear that it might be contaminated.

    Andy Coggan
     
  9. Kenny

    Kenny Guest

    warren <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<300920041901519224%[email protected]ove.com>...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Keith
    > Alexander® <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:
    >
    > > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    > > >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic steroid.

    > >
    > > *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    > > a creatine routine during the racing season?

    >
    > What is the risk? Creatine isn't a banned substance. You'll find
    > significant amounts of it in fish and meat.


    And it works quite well for short, intense efforts of like 3 minutes.
    Though it makes you gain some weight, it really improves riding the
    well known short climbs in Flanders. i really was amazed. But i
    wouldn't take creatine when i plan to climb some frenc cols. Because
    the effect would be rather negative then positive. And creatine in
    combination with the heat over there, results in muscle cramps after a
    while (especially when you don't drink enough).

    Kenny
     
  10. On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren wrote:
    > Stewart Fleming wrote:
    >> No, but the nandrolone you (allegedly) have to take in combination for
    >> it to do any good IS a banned substance...

    >
    > I assume you're joking. If you're not, the possible benefits of
    > creatine have virtually nothing to do with any benefit from nandralone
    > or any other anabolic steroid.


    Jeff was supposed to provide an easy-to-remember link to this story,
    wasn't he?
     
  11. warren

    warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Kenny
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > warren <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<300920041901519224%[email protected]>...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, Keith
    > > Alexander® <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:
    > >
    > > > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]>
    > > > wrote:
    > > >
    > > > >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    > > > >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic steroid.
    > > >
    > > > *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    > > > a creatine routine during the racing season?

    > >
    > > What is the risk? Creatine isn't a banned substance. You'll find
    > > significant amounts of it in fish and meat.

    >
    > And it works quite well for short, intense efforts of like 3 minutes.
    > Though it makes you gain some weight, it really improves riding the
    > well known short climbs in Flanders. i really was amazed. But i
    > wouldn't take creatine when i plan to climb some frenc cols. Because
    > the effect would be rather negative then positive. And creatine in
    > combination with the heat over there, results in muscle cramps after a
    > while (especially when you don't drink enough).


    Ingesting creatine monohydrate will probably add to your stores of
    creatine phosphate, or help make more creatine phosphate available when
    needed. The creatine phosphate energy cycle lasts, or your readily
    available creatine is depleted... in less than 20 seconds.

    IOW, creatine is not used for efforts longer than 20 seconds, and more
    likely less than 15 seconds. After an effort that uses creatine
    phosphate your available stores will be replenished in around 1-2
    minutes, depending on how much creatine is still available.

    Try a google on "creatine phosphate energy".

    -WG
     
  12. Andy Coggan

    Andy Coggan Guest

    "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:011020040916081901%[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Kenny
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > warren <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:<300920041901519224%[email protected]>...
    > > > In article <[email protected]>, Keith
    > > > Alexander® <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]>
    > > > > wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    > > > > >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic

    steroid.
    > > > >
    > > > > *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    > > > > a creatine routine during the racing season?
    > > >
    > > > What is the risk? Creatine isn't a banned substance. You'll find
    > > > significant amounts of it in fish and meat.

    > >
    > > And it works quite well for short, intense efforts of like 3 minutes.
    > > Though it makes you gain some weight, it really improves riding the
    > > well known short climbs in Flanders. i really was amazed. But i
    > > wouldn't take creatine when i plan to climb some frenc cols. Because
    > > the effect would be rather negative then positive. And creatine in
    > > combination with the heat over there, results in muscle cramps after a
    > > while (especially when you don't drink enough).

    >
    > Ingesting creatine monohydrate will probably add to your stores of
    > creatine phosphate, or help make more creatine phosphate available when
    > needed. The creatine phosphate energy cycle lasts, or your readily
    > available creatine is depleted... in less than 20 seconds.
    >
    > IOW, creatine is not used for efforts longer than 20 seconds, and more
    > likely less than 15 seconds.


    You mean "is not used exclusively" (obviously you must, since no energy
    "system" operates indendently of the others). IOW, Kenny is correct in
    stating that creatine phosphate loading can increase average power during
    efforts lasting several minutes. Unfortunately, it does come at a price,
    i.e., increased body mass...and at least in my experience, it's a zero-sum
    game.

    Andy Coggan
     
  13. Warren

    Warren Guest

    "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:011020040916081901%[email protected]
    > > In article <[email protected]>, Kenny
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > warren <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:<300920041901519224%[email protected]>...
    > > > > In article <[email protected]>, Keith
    > > > > Alexander® <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]>
    > > > > > wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    > > > > > >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic

    > steroid.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    > > > > > a creatine routine during the racing season?
    > > > >
    > > > > What is the risk? Creatine isn't a banned substance. You'll find
    > > > > significant amounts of it in fish and meat.
    > > >
    > > > And it works quite well for short, intense efforts of like 3 minutes.
    > > > Though it makes you gain some weight, it really improves riding the
    > > > well known short climbs in Flanders. i really was amazed. But i
    > > > wouldn't take creatine when i plan to climb some frenc cols. Because
    > > > the effect would be rather negative then positive. And creatine in
    > > > combination with the heat over there, results in muscle cramps after a
    > > > while (especially when you don't drink enough).

    > >
    > > Ingesting creatine monohydrate will probably add to your stores of
    > > creatine phosphate, or help make more creatine phosphate available when
    > > needed. The creatine phosphate energy cycle lasts, or your readily
    > > available creatine is depleted... in less than 20 seconds.
    > >
    > > IOW, creatine is not used for efforts longer than 20 seconds, and more
    > > likely less than 15 seconds.

    >
    > You mean "is not used exclusively" (obviously you must, since no energy
    > "system" operates indendently of the others).


    Yes, that's what I was thinking.

    IOW, Kenny is correct in
    > stating that creatine phosphate loading can increase average power during
    > efforts lasting several minutes.


    If CP is even needed for the effort, but climbing a hill for a minute or so?
    I don't think taking CM will help him much and as you say below, the extra
    water retained is worse than any help he might get from CM.

    Unfortunately, it does come at a price,
    > i.e., increased body mass...and at least in my experience, it's a zero-sum
    > game.


    If body mass and/or gravity is a significant factor, yes. I can't see why
    somebody other than a sprinter would want to use CM and even then it's a
    small factor compared to training and natural ability.

    -WG
     
  14. Cat Dailey

    Cat Dailey Guest

    "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:011020040916081901%[email protected]
    > > In article <[email protected]>, Kenny
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > warren <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:<300920041901519224%[email protected]>...
    > > > > In article <[email protected]>, Keith
    > > > > Alexander® <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]>
    > > > > > wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    > > > > > >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic

    > steroid.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    > > > > > a creatine routine during the racing season?
    > > > >
    > > > > What is the risk? Creatine isn't a banned substance. You'll find
    > > > > significant amounts of it in fish and meat.
    > > >
    > > > And it works quite well for short, intense efforts of like 3 minutes.
    > > > Though it makes you gain some weight, it really improves riding the
    > > > well known short climbs in Flanders. i really was amazed. But i
    > > > wouldn't take creatine when i plan to climb some frenc cols. Because
    > > > the effect would be rather negative then positive. And creatine in
    > > > combination with the heat over there, results in muscle cramps after a
    > > > while (especially when you don't drink enough).

    > >
    > > Ingesting creatine monohydrate will probably add to your stores of
    > > creatine phosphate, or help make more creatine phosphate available when
    > > needed. The creatine phosphate energy cycle lasts, or your readily
    > > available creatine is depleted... in less than 20 seconds.
    > >
    > > IOW, creatine is not used for efforts longer than 20 seconds, and more
    > > likely less than 15 seconds.

    >
    > You mean "is not used exclusively" (obviously you must, since no energy
    > "system" operates indendently of the others). IOW, Kenny is correct in
    > stating that creatine phosphate loading can increase average power during
    > efforts lasting several minutes. Unfortunately, it does come at a price,
    > i.e., increased body mass...and at least in my experience, it's a zero-sum
    > game.
    >
    > Andy Coggan
    >


    There are quite a few small studies that show that it is particularly
    beneficial for female athletes, with little or no weight gain.

    Cat
     
  15. Sam

    Sam Guest

    "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:011020040916081901%[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Kenny
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > warren <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:<300920041901519224%[email protected]>...
    > > > In article <[email protected]>, Keith
    > > > Alexander® <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]>
    > > > > wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    > > > > >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic

    steroid.
    > > > >
    > > > > *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    > > > > a creatine routine during the racing season?
    > > >
    > > > What is the risk? Creatine isn't a banned substance. You'll find
    > > > significant amounts of it in fish and meat.

    > >
    > > And it works quite well for short, intense efforts of like 3 minutes.
    > > Though it makes you gain some weight, it really improves riding the
    > > well known short climbs in Flanders. i really was amazed. But i
    > > wouldn't take creatine when i plan to climb some frenc cols. Because
    > > the effect would be rather negative then positive. And creatine in
    > > combination with the heat over there, results in muscle cramps after a
    > > while (especially when you don't drink enough).

    >
    > Ingesting creatine monohydrate will probably add to your stores of
    > creatine phosphate, or help make more creatine phosphate available when
    > needed. The creatine phosphate energy cycle lasts, or your readily
    > available creatine is depleted... in less than 20 seconds.
    >
    > IOW, creatine is not used for efforts longer than 20 seconds, and more
    > likely less than 15 seconds. After an effort that uses creatine
    > phosphate your available stores will be replenished in around 1-2
    > minutes, depending on how much creatine is still available.
    >
    > Try a google on "creatine phosphate energy".
    >
    > -WG


    Taking creatine just before a race or an event, even something like the
    match sprint will not do you any good. Creatine's benefits come from
    increasing the work one may do during training. Classic example is in
    weightlifting where lifters on creatine will be able to lift more reps,
    getting more training stimulus and thus getting benefit.

    Only if someone is severly creatine depleted could it even help in just
    before exercise and even then it would be questionnable. (Female gymnasts
    benefit greatly from creatine supplementation at least in one case I am
    familiar with).
     
  16. Sam

    Sam Guest

    "Cat Dailey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]
    >
    > "Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:011020040916081901%[email protected]
    > > > In article <[email protected]>, Kenny
    > > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > warren <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:<300920041901519224%[email protected]>...
    > > > > > In article <[email protected]>, Keith
    > > > > > Alexander® <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]>
    > > > > > > wrote:
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    > > > > > > >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic

    > > steroid.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    > > > > > > a creatine routine during the racing season?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > What is the risk? Creatine isn't a banned substance. You'll find
    > > > > > significant amounts of it in fish and meat.
    > > > >
    > > > > And it works quite well for short, intense efforts of like 3

    minutes.
    > > > > Though it makes you gain some weight, it really improves riding the
    > > > > well known short climbs in Flanders. i really was amazed. But i
    > > > > wouldn't take creatine when i plan to climb some frenc cols.

    Because
    > > > > the effect would be rather negative then positive. And creatine in
    > > > > combination with the heat over there, results in muscle cramps after

    a
    > > > > while (especially when you don't drink enough).
    > > >
    > > > Ingesting creatine monohydrate will probably add to your stores of
    > > > creatine phosphate, or help make more creatine phosphate available

    when
    > > > needed. The creatine phosphate energy cycle lasts, or your readily
    > > > available creatine is depleted... in less than 20 seconds.
    > > >
    > > > IOW, creatine is not used for efforts longer than 20 seconds, and more
    > > > likely less than 15 seconds.

    > >
    > > You mean "is not used exclusively" (obviously you must, since no energy
    > > "system" operates indendently of the others). IOW, Kenny is correct in
    > > stating that creatine phosphate loading can increase average power

    during
    > > efforts lasting several minutes. Unfortunately, it does come at a price,
    > > i.e., increased body mass...and at least in my experience, it's a

    zero-sum
    > > game.
    > >
    > > Andy Coggan
    > >

    >
    > There are quite a few small studies that show that it is particularly
    > beneficial for female athletes, with little or no weight gain.
    >
    > Cat
    >
    >

    Female athletes may not eat much meat or even enough energy intake. In that
    case the supplement may just get them back to "normal" levels. I know of
    one specific case of several female athletes whose creatine stores were
    quite low. These gymnasts benefited greatly from creatine and a few other
    nutritional interventions mainly just to get their energy intake up.
     
  17. Sam

    Sam Guest

    Creatine by itself works just fine. There are probably hundreds of studies
    showing this.


    "Ewoud Dronkert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren wrote:
    > > Stewart Fleming wrote:
    > >> No, but the nandrolone you (allegedly) have to take in combination for
    > >> it to do any good IS a banned substance...

    > >
    > > I assume you're joking. If you're not, the possible benefits of
    > > creatine have virtually nothing to do with any benefit from nandralone
    > > or any other anabolic steroid.

    >
    > Jeff was supposed to provide an easy-to-remember link to this story,
    > wasn't he?
     
  18. warren

    warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Sam
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:011020040916081901%[email protected]
    > > In article <[email protected]>, Kenny
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > warren <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:<300920041901519224%[email protected]>...
    > > > > In article <[email protected]>, Keith
    > > > > Alexander® <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]>
    > > > > > wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    > > > > > >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic

    > steroid.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    > > > > > a creatine routine during the racing season?
    > > > >
    > > > > What is the risk? Creatine isn't a banned substance. You'll find
    > > > > significant amounts of it in fish and meat.
    > > >
    > > > And it works quite well for short, intense efforts of like 3 minutes.
    > > > Though it makes you gain some weight, it really improves riding the
    > > > well known short climbs in Flanders. i really was amazed. But i
    > > > wouldn't take creatine when i plan to climb some frenc cols. Because
    > > > the effect would be rather negative then positive. And creatine in
    > > > combination with the heat over there, results in muscle cramps after a
    > > > while (especially when you don't drink enough).

    > >
    > > Ingesting creatine monohydrate will probably add to your stores of
    > > creatine phosphate, or help make more creatine phosphate available when
    > > needed. The creatine phosphate energy cycle lasts, or your readily
    > > available creatine is depleted... in less than 20 seconds.
    > >
    > > IOW, creatine is not used for efforts longer than 20 seconds, and more
    > > likely less than 15 seconds. After an effort that uses creatine
    > > phosphate your available stores will be replenished in around 1-2
    > > minutes, depending on how much creatine is still available.
    > >
    > > Try a google on "creatine phosphate energy".
    > >
    > > -WG

    >
    > Taking creatine just before a race or an event, even something like the
    > match sprint will not do you any good. Creatine's benefits come from
    > increasing the work one may do during training. Classic example is in
    > weightlifting where lifters on creatine will be able to lift more reps,
    > getting more training stimulus and thus getting benefit.


    I'm not sure where you get the impresssion I was suggesting that
    creatine was effective if taken right before exercise. On at least two
    occasions I've told people they were wasting their time taking liquid
    creatine right before an event.

    -WG
     
  19. Sam

    Sam Guest

    "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:011020042139213672%[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Sam
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:011020040916081901%[email protected]
    > > > In article <[email protected]>, Kenny
    > > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > warren <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:<300920041901519224%[email protected]>...
    > > > > > In article <[email protected]>, Keith
    > > > > > Alexander® <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > > On Fri, 01 Oct 2004 01:23:46 GMT, warren <[email protected]e.com>
    > > > > > > wrote:
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > >the possible benefits of creatine have virtually nothing
    > > > > > > >to do with any benefit from nandralone or any other anabolic

    > > steroid.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > *** Would anyone here personally risk continuing
    > > > > > > a creatine routine during the racing season?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > What is the risk? Creatine isn't a banned substance. You'll find
    > > > > > significant amounts of it in fish and meat.
    > > > >
    > > > > And it works quite well for short, intense efforts of like 3

    minutes.
    > > > > Though it makes you gain some weight, it really improves riding the
    > > > > well known short climbs in Flanders. i really was amazed. But i
    > > > > wouldn't take creatine when i plan to climb some frenc cols.

    Because
    > > > > the effect would be rather negative then positive. And creatine in
    > > > > combination with the heat over there, results in muscle cramps after

    a
    > > > > while (especially when you don't drink enough).
    > > >
    > > > Ingesting creatine monohydrate will probably add to your stores of
    > > > creatine phosphate, or help make more creatine phosphate available

    when
    > > > needed. The creatine phosphate energy cycle lasts, or your readily
    > > > available creatine is depleted... in less than 20 seconds.
    > > >
    > > > IOW, creatine is not used for efforts longer than 20 seconds, and more
    > > > likely less than 15 seconds. After an effort that uses creatine
    > > > phosphate your available stores will be replenished in around 1-2
    > > > minutes, depending on how much creatine is still available.
    > > >
    > > > Try a google on "creatine phosphate energy".
    > > >
    > > > -WG

    > >
    > > Taking creatine just before a race or an event, even something like the
    > > match sprint will not do you any good. Creatine's benefits come from
    > > increasing the work one may do during training. Classic example is in
    > > weightlifting where lifters on creatine will be able to lift more reps,
    > > getting more training stimulus and thus getting benefit.

    >
    > I'm not sure where you get the impresssion I was suggesting that
    > creatine was effective if taken right before exercise. On at least two
    > occasions I've told people they were wasting their time taking liquid
    > creatine right before an event.
    >
    > -WG


    The IOW paragraph led me along those lines, but you are correct in that you
    are not recommending this. As much as anything else, my response was an
    elaboration of the creatine issue.

    Also, if one does a really hard effort it takes more like 5 minutes for the
    CP system to get restored to about 95%.
     
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