Creatine

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by Bonked, Nov 26, 2006.

  1. Bonked

    Bonked New Member

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    Could someone help me with information on a product called "Creatine Burst" from GNC. I'm trying to find something to 'carb load' myself before a 200km Audax ride in about 80% humidty. Last one I did I bonked badly and bearly scaped home.
     
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  2. UncleFred

    UncleFred New Member

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    I've just completed a 600k ride around Puerto Rico in Temparatures of mid to high 80's. Food for the ride included traditional carb loading on Pasta for the week prior to the ride, then on the day, pastries for breakfast, granola bars,bananas power bars, oatmeal, pancakes, baked potatoes and lots of fruit.

    The only supplements were multi vitamins. I've not used any creatine products so can't comment on their effectiveness. Merely wanted to give my view that you can do long ride with suffecient nutrition.
     
  3. UNF_Chaz

    UNF_Chaz New Member

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    I've tried using creatine during my rides and to see if there would be any improvements, and after a month, I didn't notice a thing. But when I use to lift weights and take creatine... thats a different story.
     
  4. CapeRoadster

    CapeRoadster New Member

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    Try real carbohydrate loading. There are a few methods but they're basically the same. From the Mayo Clinic:
    • Step 1. About a week before the event, reduce your carbohydrate intake to about 40 percent to 50 percent of your total calories. Increase protein and fat intake to compensate for the decrease in carbohydrates. Continue training at your normal level. This will help deplete your carbohydrate stores and make room for the loading that comes next.
    • Step 2. Three to four days before the event, increase your carbohydrate intake to 60 percent to 70 percent of your daily calories — or about 4 to 4.5 grams of carbohydrates per pound of body weight. Cut back on foods higher in fat to compensate for the extra carbohydrate-rich foods. Also scale back your training to avoid depleting your glycogen stores. Rest completely for a day or two before the event.
    Various studies suggest that simply resting and increasing carbohydrate intake two to three days before a high-endurance activity is effective, too. But there are a few caveats.

    Carbohydrate loading works best when you've been on a carbohydrate-rich diet throughout your training — and it may be more effective for men, perhaps because endocrine differences between the sexes cause men to utilize carbohydrates to a greater extent during endurance exercise.

    And even if you've loaded up on carbohydrates ahead of time, you still need to replenish them during the event to maintain your blood sugar levels — especially if you've been going for more than 60 minutes. Try a piece of fruit or a sports drink.
     
  5. tk_bike

    tk_bike New Member

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    There's no need to deplete your stores as per the 'traditional' carb loading methods. a very high carb diet for the preceding few days is sufficient. If training alot try to eat 10-12 grams per kilo body weight per day (1 kg = 2.2 lb)





     
  6. Bonked

    Bonked New Member

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    Thanks this is a great reply. Now could I ask what is the best carb loading food to eat?



     
  7. CapeRoadster

    CapeRoadster New Member

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    Away from training and racing, I'd get a lot of my carbs from fruits and vegetables. Closer to an event, I'd use starchier foods, like breads, pastas. Experiment in training. Veggies tend to be more gas-producing. I'd also stay away from fructose and corn syrup altogether, in foods and sports drinks, for the same reason.
     
  8. Hookyrider

    Hookyrider New Member

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    I'm affraid creatine and carb loading are not one in the same.

    I've used Creatine, and I have to say I believe I am one of the people they call a non-responder, the only thing different was my wallet. I have had friends who have used Creatine, and felt it was very effective for them.

    On your 200K ride you'll need do do some carb loading, however eating enough of the right things while your performing will be what really gets you to the finish without the bonk. Carb replacement drinks, experiment with gels, and a few of the responses above hit the nail pretty square.

    HR
     
  9. CapeRoadster

    CapeRoadster New Member

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    Certainly they are not.
     
  10. Archibald

    Archibald New Member

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    one of the easiest ways to carbo load is by simply reducing your fat intake.
     
  11. Tapeworm

    Tapeworm New Member

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    The use of creatine is primarily associated with short intense activities, weight lifting, sprinting etc. As far as I know there is no benefit to endurance athletes per se.

    Where there is a benefit is that using creatine should help you perform intensity sessions (lactic threshold repeats for example) for a longer period of time.

    There is also anecdotal evidence that creatine may assist in the slightly increased production of Growth Hormone levels, thus allowing better recovery of muscle mass or protection of muscle mass and the assisted metabolism of fat during endurance exercise, etc etc.

    However there is much to argue against this. Here's a link to the negative side of the argument.

    http://www.rice.edu/~jenky/sports/creatine.html

    My 2 cents, is that if you generally cycle for endurance then save the dollars and eat healthy instead. Probably will have better benefit to your performance.

    On the topic of carbo-loading. If for a specific event, as opposed to your general training you can increase your stores of carbohydrates by increasing over approximately a 3-day period. This isn't a licence to eat everything and anything. Best to go for foods in complex carbohydrates eg: bread, pasta, potatoes etc. Try and mix it up as too much of one food can cause digestion problems. Small frequent meals are the best way. Supposedly you don't need to go through the "depletion phase" of practically starving yourself 3 days before hand. However if you are in a proper taper phase your carb intake should have slid down as well.

    Hope that helps.
     
  12. CapeRoadster

    CapeRoadster New Member

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    I agreed with everything you said except this. Pasta is not a complex carb, nor are many breads. Potatoes may be a poor choice as well, since they are high glycemic index foods. Sweet potatoes are a better choice than white potatoes in that regard. Just a thought.
     
  13. Tapeworm

    Tapeworm New Member

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    Ah very true! I should have included more details and clarity. I should have stipulated multigrain and or wholemeal bread and wholemeal pasta are better choices (this is what I normally eat).

    As far as I know white bread and pasta are still complex carbohydrates however due to the increased amount of processing lack the same amount of starch (fibre), vitiams, minerals etc. Becuase of this they are rated high on the glycemic index (GI). (Although I have heard of breads being used by some fast food chains do actually have NO fibre or nutritional value. Just a rumour of course ;) )

    Simple carbohydrates are usually listed as being table sugar, chocolate, honey (some argue this), some fruits, etc. Milk is also often rated in the simple carbohydrates (no fibe).

    Potatoes are indeed high on the GI, and they are packed full of calories so having a lot on a regular basis may not be the best idea for everyone. Sweet potatoes would indeed be a better choice for regular consumption. But for a carbo loading session I think normal (white) potatoes would be fine. Hmmm baked potatoes and cheese :D
     
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