Crepe hassles...?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Kenneth, Jan 22, 2006.

  1. Kenneth

    Kenneth Guest

    Howdy,

    I have made crepes in pans for years. I heat the pan, butter
    it a bit, ladle in the batter, swirl, flip, and serve.

    Now, I am trying a Tibos crepe maker (because I wanted a
    much larger crepe) and am having no luck whatever... This
    machine is the home version of the more robust type used all
    over France.

    I am trying to use the "traditional" spreader (a wooden
    "rake" like thing.) I keep it wet prior to use.

    If I put any butter on the heated baking surface, any
    attempt to spread the batter causes it to just "pile up"
    preventing anything even remotely like the formation of a
    crepe. That would seem to happen because there is far too
    little friction between the baking surface (already
    non-stick) and the rapidly solidifying batter.

    If, instead, I leave the heated surface "dry" the attempts
    to spread the batter are only slightly better.

    No matter what I've tried, I cannot come close to spreading
    the batter to create a (reasonably) uniform crepe covering
    more than about half the baking surface.

    I would welcome any suggestions from folks who have
    succeeded with one of these crepe makers.

    Sincere thanks for any help,
    --
    Kenneth

    If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
     
    Tags:


  2. limey

    limey Guest

    "Kenneth" <[email protected]> wrote >
    > Howdy,
    >
    > I have made crepes in pans for years. I heat the pan, butter
    > it a bit, ladle in the batter, swirl, flip, and serve.
    >
    > Now, I am trying a Tibos crepe maker (because I wanted a
    > much larger crepe) and am having no luck whatever... This
    > machine is the home version of the more robust type used all
    > over France.
    >
    > I am trying to use the "traditional" spreader (a wooden
    > "rake" like thing.) I keep it wet prior to use.
    >
    > If I put any butter on the heated baking surface, any
    > attempt to spread the batter causes it to just "pile up"
    > preventing anything even remotely like the formation of a
    > crepe. That would seem to happen because there is far too
    > little friction between the baking surface (already
    > non-stick) and the rapidly solidifying batter.
    >
    > If, instead, I leave the heated surface "dry" the attempts
    > to spread the batter are only slightly better.
    >
    > No matter what I've tried, I cannot come close to spreading
    > the batter to create a (reasonably) uniform crepe covering
    > more than about half the baking surface.
    >
    > I would welcome any suggestions from folks who have
    > succeeded with one of these crepe makers.
    >
    > Sincere thanks for any help,
    > --
    > Kenneth
    >

    I don't have one of the crêpe makers but - just a thought. Would it help to
    thin the batter a little?

    Dora
     
  3. Kenneth

    Kenneth Guest

    On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 12:34:04 -0500, "limey"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Kenneth" <[email protected]> wrote >
    >> Howdy,
    >>
    >> I have made crepes in pans for years. I heat the pan, butter
    >> it a bit, ladle in the batter, swirl, flip, and serve.
    >>
    >> Now, I am trying a Tibos crepe maker (because I wanted a
    >> much larger crepe) and am having no luck whatever... This
    >> machine is the home version of the more robust type used all
    >> over France.
    >>
    >> I am trying to use the "traditional" spreader (a wooden
    >> "rake" like thing.) I keep it wet prior to use.
    >>
    >> If I put any butter on the heated baking surface, any
    >> attempt to spread the batter causes it to just "pile up"
    >> preventing anything even remotely like the formation of a
    >> crepe. That would seem to happen because there is far too
    >> little friction between the baking surface (already
    >> non-stick) and the rapidly solidifying batter.
    >>
    >> If, instead, I leave the heated surface "dry" the attempts
    >> to spread the batter are only slightly better.
    >>
    >> No matter what I've tried, I cannot come close to spreading
    >> the batter to create a (reasonably) uniform crepe covering
    >> more than about half the baking surface.
    >>
    >> I would welcome any suggestions from folks who have
    >> succeeded with one of these crepe makers.
    >>
    >> Sincere thanks for any help,
    >> --
    >> Kenneth
    >>

    >I don't have one of the crêpe makers but - just a thought. Would it help to
    >thin the batter a little?
    >
    >Dora
    >

    Hi Dora,

    Nope...

    I've tried that with no success...

    Thanks,
    --
    Kenneth

    If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
     
  4. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 13:14:45 -0500, Kenneth wrote:

    > On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 12:34:04 -0500, "limey"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Kenneth" <[email protected]> wrote >
    > >> Howdy,
    > >>
    > >> I have made crepes in pans for years. I heat the pan, butter
    > >> it a bit, ladle in the batter, swirl, flip, and serve.
    > >>
    > >> Now, I am trying a Tibos crepe maker (because I wanted a
    > >> much larger crepe) and am having no luck whatever... This
    > >> machine is the home version of the more robust type used all
    > >> over France.
    > >>
    > >> I am trying to use the "traditional" spreader (a wooden
    > >> "rake" like thing.) I keep it wet prior to use.
    > >>
    > >> If I put any butter on the heated baking surface, any
    > >> attempt to spread the batter causes it to just "pile up"
    > >> preventing anything even remotely like the formation of a
    > >> crepe. That would seem to happen because there is far too
    > >> little friction between the baking surface (already
    > >> non-stick) and the rapidly solidifying batter.
    > >>
    > >> If, instead, I leave the heated surface "dry" the attempts
    > >> to spread the batter are only slightly better.
    > >>
    > >> No matter what I've tried, I cannot come close to spreading
    > >> the batter to create a (reasonably) uniform crepe covering
    > >> more than about half the baking surface.
    > >>
    > >> I would welcome any suggestions from folks who have
    > >> succeeded with one of these crepe makers.
    > >>
    > >> Sincere thanks for any help,
    > >> --
    > >> Kenneth
    > >>

    > >I don't have one of the crêpe makers but - just a thought. Would it help to
    > >thin the batter a little?
    > >
    > >Dora
    > >

    > Hi Dora,
    >
    > Nope...
    >
    > I've tried that with no success...
    >

    I finally Googled to see what you're talking about....
    http://www.comforthouse.com/comfort/wesbenbreadm.html

    I see them used here in crepe places here. I'll pay better attention
    next time I see it used, but I suspect your unit is probably too hot.
    Since you've made crepes successfully in the past, you know it's not
    you or your recipe.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  5. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    sf wrote:

    > I see them used here in crepe places here. I'll pay better attention
    > next time I see it used, but I suspect your unit is probably too hot.
    > Since you've made crepes successfully in the past, you know it's not
    > you or your recipe.


    Crepe makers should have a temperature control. My electric crepe maker does, but I
    have had better luck with pans on the stove.
     
  6. Kenneth

    Kenneth Guest

    On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 16:36:22 -0800, sf
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I see them used here in crepe places here. I'll pay better attention
    >next time I see it used, but I suspect your unit is probably too hot.
    >Since you've made crepes successfully in the past, you know it's not
    >you or your recipe.


    Howdy,

    The recipe comment is interesting...

    The first few times I tried the new cooker I used the recipe
    that I have used successfully for years, and had no luck
    whatever.

    Then I thought to try the recipes provided with the new
    cooker.

    They were significantly different from mine, but still no
    luck.

    Also, I have seen these machines in use many times in
    France, but I can't seem to duplicate the results at all.

    We shall see...

    Thanks,
    --
    Kenneth

    If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
     
  7. Kenneth

    Kenneth Guest

    On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 19:44:14 -0500, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >sf wrote:
    >
    >> I see them used here in crepe places here. I'll pay better attention
    >> next time I see it used, but I suspect your unit is probably too hot.
    >> Since you've made crepes successfully in the past, you know it's not
    >> you or your recipe.

    >
    >Crepe makers should have a temperature control. My electric crepe maker does, but I
    >have had better luck with pans on the stove.
    >


    Hello again,

    My new gadget has a temperature control and I have
    experimented with it thoroughly, but to no avail.

    I can tell that it is affecting the temperature
    significantly, but even at the coolest setting, I cannot
    manage anything near a complete distribution of the batter.

    All the best,
    --
    Kenneth

    If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
     
  8. Nancy1

    Nancy1 Guest

    Kenneth wrote:
    > Howdy,
    >
    > I have made crepes in pans for years. I heat the pan, butter
    > it a bit, ladle in the batter, swirl, flip, and serve.
    >
    > Now, I am trying a Tibos crepe maker (because I wanted a
    > much larger crepe) and am having no luck whatever... This
    > machine is the home version of the more robust type used all
    > over France.
    >
    > I am trying to use the "traditional" spreader (a wooden
    > "rake" like thing.) I keep it wet prior to use.
    >
    > If I put any butter on the heated baking surface, any
    > attempt to spread the batter causes it to just "pile up"
    > preventing anything even remotely like the formation of a
    > crepe. That would seem to happen because there is far too
    > little friction between the baking surface (already
    > non-stick) and the rapidly solidifying batter.
    >
    > If, instead, I leave the heated surface "dry" the attempts
    > to spread the batter are only slightly better.
    >
    > No matter what I've tried, I cannot come close to spreading
    > the batter to create a (reasonably) uniform crepe covering
    > more than about half the baking surface.
    >
    > I would welcome any suggestions from folks who have
    > succeeded with one of these crepe makers.
    >
    > Sincere thanks for any help,
    > --
    > Kenneth


    The best way to get the crepe batter to cover the pan is to tip it and
    shake it a little bit and let the batter find its own way.

    If the batter is setting up too fast, your pan is probably too hot.

    FYI, not every chef thinks it's necessary to flip a crepe - if it is
    completely done, and your finished dish will not show the inside (so
    you won't need the pretty light brown lacey pattern from baking), don't
    bother to flip it.

    N.
     
  9. Kenneth

    Kenneth Guest

    On 23 Jan 2006 09:13:12 -0800, "Nancy1"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Kenneth wrote:
    >> Howdy,
    >>
    >> I have made crepes in pans for years. I heat the pan, butter
    >> it a bit, ladle in the batter, swirl, flip, and serve.
    >>
    >> Now, I am trying a Tibos crepe maker (because I wanted a
    >> much larger crepe) and am having no luck whatever... This
    >> machine is the home version of the more robust type used all
    >> over France.
    >>
    >> I am trying to use the "traditional" spreader (a wooden
    >> "rake" like thing.) I keep it wet prior to use.
    >>
    >> If I put any butter on the heated baking surface, any
    >> attempt to spread the batter causes it to just "pile up"
    >> preventing anything even remotely like the formation of a
    >> crepe. That would seem to happen because there is far too
    >> little friction between the baking surface (already
    >> non-stick) and the rapidly solidifying batter.
    >>
    >> If, instead, I leave the heated surface "dry" the attempts
    >> to spread the batter are only slightly better.
    >>
    >> No matter what I've tried, I cannot come close to spreading
    >> the batter to create a (reasonably) uniform crepe covering
    >> more than about half the baking surface.
    >>
    >> I would welcome any suggestions from folks who have
    >> succeeded with one of these crepe makers.
    >>
    >> Sincere thanks for any help,
    >> --
    >> Kenneth

    >
    >The best way to get the crepe batter to cover the pan is to tip it and
    >shake it a little bit and let the batter find its own way.
    >
    >If the batter is setting up too fast, your pan is probably too hot.
    >
    >FYI, not every chef thinks it's necessary to flip a crepe - if it is
    >completely done, and your finished dish will not show the inside (so
    >you won't need the pretty light brown lacey pattern from baking), don't
    >bother to flip it.
    >
    >N.


    Hi Nancy,

    I am not seeking information about making crepes in a pan
    (as I do that very well).

    I'm having trouble with a crepe maker that cannot be tilted
    to distribute the batter.

    Thanks,
    --
    Kenneth

    If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
     
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