Criterium Announcers giving too much information?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ronde Chumpion, May 29, 2003.

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  1. Hey,

    Just a question about the policy of an announcer telling the field too much information, such as
    who is in a break, and updating the time splits. Does this practice lead to negative, chase
    everything down, type tactics? In road races, splits are given my the motorbike on chalkboards. For
    criteriums, it seems like everyone only chases when they are reminded to. Are announcers affecting
    the outcome of races with their style of calling the event?

    Thanks, Ronde Chumpion

    Carney is no chump. Funny reading what some guys wrote after Sommerville.
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>, ronde chumpion
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hey,
    >
    > Just a question about the policy of an announcer telling the field too much information, such as
    > who is in a break, and updating the time splits. Does this practice lead to negative, chase
    > everything down, type tactics? In road races, splits are given my the motorbike on chalkboards.
    > For criteriums, it seems like everyone only chases when they are reminded to. Are announcers
    > affecting the outcome of races with their style of calling the event?
    >

    As an announcer I give time splits to both the pack and the breakaway in Crits. If you are going to
    give a time split to one group I think you need to be fair and give the slits to all the groups.
    I've never announced who is in the break to the pack unless I happen to be talking about someone in
    the break while the pack is within hearing distance.
     
  3. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    Hey,
    >
    > Just a question about the policy of an announcer telling the field too much information, such as
    > who is in a break, and updating the time splits. Does this practice lead to negative, chase
    > everything down, type tactics? In road races, splits are given my the motorbike on chalkboards.
    > For criteriums, it seems like everyone only chases when they are reminded to. Are announcers
    > affecting the outcome of races with their style of calling the event?
    >
    > Thanks, Ronde Chumpion
    >
    > Carney is no chump. Funny reading what some guys wrote after Sommerville.

    My personal rant about announcers at races:

    Relax! Not EVERYTHING is that exciting. There are a few announcers here in SD/SoCal that are
    always super-excited about everything. Since this is typed, I can't even give you an example.
    Sufficed to say that the constant state of "excitement" leads to a loud monotone that I have
    learned to tune out.

    Its like they're being paid by the word, so they have to get as many out as they can...

    When things are popping, THEN it is time to get excited. If the pack's JRA, relax till something
    happens that is noteworthy.

    That's my rant. Flame away!

    Mike
     
  4. Casey Kerrigan wrote:
    >
    > As an announcer ...I think you need to be fair and give the slits to all the groups.

    i bet you're a popular popular announcer with that philosophy.

    (don't know what's wrong with me today, but i'm worse than normal that's for sure)

    heather
     
  5. "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Hey,
    > >
    > > Just a question about the policy of an announcer telling the field too much information, such
    > > as who is in a break, and updating the time splits. Does this practice lead to negative, chase
    > > everything down, type tactics? In road races, splits are given my the motorbike on chalkboards.
    > > For criteriums, it seems like everyone only chases when they are reminded to. Are announcers
    > > affecting the outcome of races with their style of calling the event?
    > >
    > > Thanks, Ronde Chumpion
    > >
    > > Carney is no chump. Funny reading what some guys wrote after Sommerville.
    >
    > My personal rant about announcers at races:
    >
    > Relax! Not EVERYTHING is that exciting. There are a few announcers here
    in
    > SD/SoCal that are always super-excited about everything. Since this is typed, I can't even give
    > you an example. Sufficed to say that the
    constant
    > state of "excitement" leads to a loud monotone that I have learned to tune out.
    >
    > Its like they're being paid by the word, so they have to get as many out
    as
    > they can...
    >
    > When things are popping, THEN it is time to get excited. If the pack's
    JRA,
    > relax till something happens that is noteworthy.
    >
    > That's my rant. Flame away!

    They should let me and Double Sausage Quesnell announce more races. When nothing's happening, we
    just start ripping on everyone, enough to make some of the rider's girlfriends mad.
     
  6. Amit

    Amit Guest

    "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > My personal rant about announcers at races:
    >
    > Relax! Not EVERYTHING is that exciting. There are a few announcers here in SD/SoCal that are
    > always super-excited about everything. Since this is typed, I can't even give you an example.
    > Sufficed to say that the constant state of "excitement" leads to a loud monotone that I have
    > learned to tune out.
    >

    That's the Dick Fries style. Yelling at the top of your lungs, and usually the same thing over and
    over, and some people think he's good. Does Phil Ligett do this ? no.

    -Amit
     
  7. "Amit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > That's the Dick Fries style. Yelling at the top of your lungs, and usually the same thing over
    > and over

    My dream in racing is to get good enough that Fries will scream "JT's in the house!!! JT's in the
    house!!! JT's in the house!!!"

    JT

    --
    *******************************************
    NB: reply-to address is munged

    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    *******************************************
     
  8. Xzzy

    Xzzy Guest

    Casey,

    It sounds like you are doing your job well, being an announcer the way it should be done, report
    the news, inform the crowd, without playing favorites to the racers.

    My rant is from happenings with an announcer that knew how to use ad hoc premes to speed up /
    slow down groups in a race - namely my rant is preme lap numbers should be listed as part of the
    prize list and not left to the whim of a whanna be's interests.

    John Bickmore www.BicycleCam.com www.Feed-Zone.com

    "Casey Kerrigan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:290520031034461302%[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, ronde chumpion
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Hey,
    > >
    > > Just a question about the policy of an announcer telling the field too much information, such
    > > as who is in a break, and updating the time splits. Does this practice lead to negative, chase
    > > everything down, type tactics? In road races, splits are given my the motorbike on chalkboards.
    > > For criteriums, it seems like everyone only chases when they are reminded to. Are announcers
    > > affecting the outcome of races with their style of calling the event?
    > >
    >
    > As an announcer I give time splits to both the pack and the breakaway in Crits. If you are going
    > to give a time split to one group I think you need to be fair and give the slits to all the
    > groups. I've never announced who is in the break to the pack unless I happen to be talking about
    > someone in the break while the pack is within hearing distance.
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, xzzy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Casey,
    >
    > It sounds like you are doing your job well, being an announcer the way it should be done,
    > report the news, inform the crowd, without playing favorites to the racers.
    >
    > My rant is from happenings with an announcer that knew how to use ad hoc premes to speed up /
    > slow down groups in a race - namely my rant is preme lap numbers should be listed as part of
    > the prize list and not left to the whim of a whanna be's interests.
    >
    Hey as both an announcer and an official there have been time I have used Primes to help manage the
    race. Most of these times have been when there are two separate categories racing on a crit course
    at the same time. I've used primes to help affect when one groups would lap/pass the other with the
    goal of making sue each group was well separated at teh finish. Also I have ued primes ( generally
    lower value merchadise) to help speed up the pack so that it will not get caught be a breakaway on
    the last lap of the race.

    There are also time when you don't want a prime to happen ( just after a large crash, just before a
    group of riders are about to be lapped etc). In general I'm not in favor of pre-announced or
    pre-scheduled primes.

    Casey
     
  10. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <290520031945561150%[email protected]>, Casey Kerrigan
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, xzzy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hey as both an announcer and an official there have been time I have used Primes to help manage
    > the race. Most of these times have been when there are two separate categories racing on a crit
    > course at the same time. I've used primes to help affect when one groups would lap/pass the other
    > with the goal of making sue each group was well separated at teh finish. Also I have ued primes (
    > generally lower value merchadise) to help speed up the pack so that it will not get caught be a
    > breakaway on the last lap of the race.
    >
    > There are also time when you don't want a prime to happen ( just after a large crash, just before
    > a group of riders are about to be lapped etc). In general I'm not in favor of pre-announced or
    > pre-scheduled primes.

    I agree with Casey, and as someone who did alot of races in New England with Dick Ring (the best!)
    or East Coast with Brian Drebber announcing it's nice to have a knowledgeable announcer who can have
    a positive affect on the race with judicious use of premes. Nothing like going off the front for a
    few laps hoping for a preme only to hear "Ding Ding Ring" ringing the bell for $50. As he would say,
    "He's out there looking for a little bit of gas money!" One of my favorite races each year was his
    Lowell Criterium on Memorial Day. Only event of the day was a 1,2,3 criterium and he could get
    5,000+ spectators in a frenzy and the racers got paid well.

    -WG
     
  11. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, John Forrest Tomlinson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Amit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > That's the Dick Fries style. Yelling at the top of your lungs, and usually the same thing over
    > > and over
    >
    > My dream in racing is to get good enough that Fries will scream "JT's in the house!!! JT's in the
    > house!!! JT's in the house!!!"

    But don't you already hear that every night at home?

    -WG
     
  12. Alan Atwood

    Alan Atwood Guest

    "John Forrest Tomlinson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Amit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > That's the Dick Fries style. Yelling at the top of your lungs, and usually the same thing over
    > > and over
    >
    > My dream in racing is to get good enough that Fries will scream "JT's in the house!!! JT's in the
    > house!!! JT's in the house!!!"
    >
    > JT

    Beware of what you wish for!!!! Show up to New Britain (CT) on 6/22 and you just might get it (I'll
    only say it once at a time though; got to save the vocal chords for those all day crits).

    Alan
     
  13. Jeff Potter

    Jeff Potter Guest

    Passing the hat for premes is a great thing!

    It should be done fairly though and sometimes isn't. --Like trying to rev up the field to catch a
    break: ouch! If they do that, they should give even MORE incentive for the break to stay away. Get
    everyone in an equal frenzy.

    It's a betting man's sport. It's horse'n'pony show. You're out there to suffer and entertain those
    folks. They can toy with you as they please. It can be a great show. The best riders play up the
    show. They'll come around and gesture, "C'mon, you can do better!" or "Let's see some cash on that!"

    Audience, riders, announcer, music...cash...it all works great together in a great race. Generally
    the announcer has to lead and know what's what and has to have riders he knows how to work with. The
    audience has to be somewhat savvy, drunk, revved-up, too. Good fun!

    I remember great mobs and great times in Boulder during Coors Classic "Cash-Register" Phinney days.
    Also in Detroit. I've heard that Athens is really something and that one north-Chicago-area race.
    Party racing is where it's at!

    I remember changing my morale in races based on the music being played. I did just dandy once after
    hearing a nice loud "All I Need is a Miracle," by Mike and the Mechanics...weaving around the
    ambulance in downtown Detroit....

    --

    Jeff Potter
    ****
    *Out Your Backdoor * http://www.outyourbackdoor.com for modern folkways and culture revival...
    ...offering "small world" views on bikes, bows, skis, books, movies... ...new books featuring: XC
    ski culture, a thriller about small town drug smuggling, and folding bicycles ... radical novels
    coming up! ...lots more books, downloadable music and videos ... articles galore! plus national "Off
    the Beaten Path" travel forums! HOLY SMOKES!
     
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