Critters in Oysters



N

Ntantiques

Guest
Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for Valentine's dinner w/DH. Have been
enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years, but got the mean crawlies tonight. As I went to
spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No matter what you've been drinking, oysters are not
supposed to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy looking creature about 1/2 inch long with
pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully gully in there with my oyster. Can only
asume it was a crab who'd molted and was using the $1.00 ea. oyster as a temporary home. I realize
that oysters are vulnerable to a variety of other sea life, but I've never heard of anyone finding
anything inside an oyster shell other than grit or a pearl. Anyway, I tossed it and was a bit
hesitant when I picked up the next oyster...damned if there wasn't another creepy critter in that
one too. So much for oysters...the rest of 'em went into the garbage & we had to make do with
chocolate. NT
 
J

Jmcquown

Guest
NTANTIQUES wrote:
> Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for Valentine's dinner w/DH. Have
> been enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years, but got the mean crawlies tonight. As I
> went to spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No matter what you've been drinking,
> oysters are not supposed to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy looking creature about
> 1/2 inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully gully in there with
> my oyster. Can only asume it was a crab who'd molted and was using the $1.00 ea. oyster as a
> temporary home. I realize that oysters are vulnerable to a variety of other sea life, but I've
> never heard of anyone finding anything inside an oyster shell other than grit or a pearl. Anyway,
> I tossed it and was a bit hesitant when I picked up the next oyster...damned if there wasn't
> another creepy critter in that one too. So much for oysters...the rest of 'em went into the
> garbage & we had to make do with chocolate. NT

EWWWWW! This is why I don't eat raw *anything*. But seriously, I have no idea what those critters
were. Never heard of such a thing.
 
K

Katra

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (NTANTIQUES) wrote:

> Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for Valentine's dinner w/DH. Have
> been enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years, but got the mean crawlies tonight. As I
> went to spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No matter what you've been drinking,
> oysters are not supposed to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy looking creature about
> 1/2 inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully gully in there with
> my oyster. Can only asume it was a crab who'd molted and was using the $1.00 ea. oyster as a
> temporary home. I realize that oysters are vulnerable to a variety of other sea life, but I've
> never heard of anyone finding anything inside an oyster shell other than grit or a pearl. Anyway,
> I tossed it and was a bit hesitant when I picked up the next oyster...damned if there wasn't
> another creepy critter in that one too. So much for oysters...the rest of 'em went into the
> garbage & we had to make do with chocolate. NT

Ew.

One more good reason to never eat raw oysters. ;-) I bread them in cornmeal and deep fry them!

Raw oyster. Ew.

K.

--
Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
 
M

Mraod

Guest
(NTANTIQUES) writes:

>Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for Valentine's dinner w/DH. Have been
>enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years, but got the mean crawlies tonight. As I went to
>spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No matter what you've been drinking, oysters are not
>supposed to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy looking creature about 1/2 inch long with
>pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully gully in there with my oyster. Can only
>asume it was a crab who'd molted and was using the $1.00 ea. oyster as a temporary home. I realize
>that oysters are vulnerable to a variety of other sea life, but I've never heard of anyone finding
>anything inside an oyster shell other than grit or a pearl. Anyway, I tossed it and was a bit
>hesitant when I picked up the next oyster...damned if there wasn't another creepy critter in that
>one too. So much for oysters...the rest of 'em went into the garbage & we had to make do with
>chocolate. NT

Shame.

http://eat.epicurious.com/dictionary/food/index.ssf?DEF_ID=3005

Best,

Marc
 
O

Orion

Guest
This from NT...

> Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for
Valentine's dinner w/DH. Have been enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years, but got the
mean crawlies tonight. As I went to spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No matter what
you've been drinking, oysters are not supposed to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy
looking creature about 1/2 inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully
gully in there with my oyster. So much for oysters...

the rest of 'em went into the garbage & we had to make do with chocolate.
> NT

**************************
I may never eat again......................

Susan
 
C

Captcook

Guest
"NTANTIQUES" wrote...
> A pale, fat, wormy looking creature about 1/2 inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs
> was doing the
hully gully
> in there with my oyster. Can only asume it was a crab who'd molted
and was
> using the $1.00 ea. oyster as a temporary home.

My experience was: I put the oysters in a sink with saltwater and left for a while. When I returned
there was a bright red worm, looking like a millipede, swimming around in the sink. It went inside
an oyster. Those oysters got steamed, a treatment that improves the flavor and controls 'pets'.
 
K

Kilikini

Guest
"NTANTIQUES" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for
Valentine's
> dinner w/DH. Have been enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years,
but
> got the mean crawlies tonight. As I went to spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No
> matter what you've been drinking, oysters are not
supposed
> to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy looking creature about
1/2
> inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully
gully
> in there with my oyster. Can only asume it was a crab who'd molted and was using the $1.00 ea.
> oyster as a temporary home. I realize that oysters
are
> vulnerable to a variety of other sea life, but I've never heard of anyone finding anything inside
> an oyster shell other than grit or a pearl.
Anyway, I
> tossed it and was a bit hesitant when I picked up the next oyster...damned
if
> there wasn't another creepy critter in that one too. So much for
oysters...the
> rest of 'em went into the garbage & we had to make do with chocolate. NT

Oh my God! That's one of the worst stories I've ever heard! But, on a good note, chocolate isn't a
bad thing...... kilikini
 
R

Richard Periut

Guest
NTANTIQUES wrote:
> Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for Valentine's dinner w/DH. Have
> been enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years, but got the mean crawlies tonight. As I
> went to spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No matter what you've been drinking,
> oysters are not supposed to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy looking creature about
> 1/2 inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully gully in there with
> my oyster. Can only asume it was a crab who'd molted and was using the $1.00 ea. oyster as a
> temporary home. I realize that oysters are vulnerable to a variety of other sea life, but I've
> never heard of anyone finding anything inside an oyster shell other than grit or a pearl. Anyway,
> I tossed it and was a bit hesitant when I picked up the next oyster...damned if there wasn't
> another creepy critter in that one too. So much for oysters...the rest of 'em went into the
> garbage & we had to make do with chocolate. NT
Could of been a type of worm (not the type seen in your backyard,) living its early stages.

Check out: http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=www.marinewildlife.co.uk/Images/MWPA-
001388.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.marinewildlife.co.uk/MWPAKerry05-
ZJ47skJ:&tbnh=64&tbnw=96&prev=/images%3Fq%3Doyster%2Bworm%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-
8%26oe%3DUTF-8%26sa%3DG

Any resemblance?

Rich
--
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Dum spiro, spero. (Cicero) As long as I breathe, I hope.
 
R

Rodney Myrvaagn

Guest
On 15 Feb 2004 08:18:45 GMT, [email protected] (NTANTIQUES)
wrote:

>Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for Valentine's dinner w/DH. Have been
>enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years, but got the mean crawlies tonight. As I went to
>spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No matter what you've been drinking, oysters are not
>supposed to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy looking creature about 1/2 inch long with
>pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully gully in there with my oyster. Can only
>asume it was a crab who'd molted and was using the $1.00 ea. oyster as a temporary home. I realize
>that oysters are vulnerable to a variety of other sea life, but I've never heard of anyone finding
>anything inside an oyster shell other than grit or a pearl. Anyway, I tossed it and was a bit
>hesitant when I picked up the next oyster...damned if there wasn't another creepy critter in that
>one too. So much for oysters...the rest of 'em went into the garbage & we had to make do with
>chocolate. NT

Big mistake.

It is not temporary at all. The oyster crab never has a hard shell, because it lives its life inside
the oyster.

George Washington was said to be inordinately fond of them. I don't know how many he could get. They
were numerous enough to be a commercial luxury in NYC at the end of the 19th C.

I have only encountered them once, two of them to be exact. I wa smaking chowder so I tossed them in
at the end. My wife and I each had one.

The flavor was startlingly like celery.

I would love to find enough to make something out of.

Rodney Myrvaagnes NYC J36 Gjo/a

The sound of a Great Blue Heron's wingbeats going by your head
 
D

Darkginger

Guest
jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote
>
> EWWWWW! This is why I don't eat raw *anything*. But seriously, I have no idea what those critters
> were. Never heard of such a thing.

The first time I ever ate an oyster (20+ years ago) was in Fécamp, France. The first one was
wonderful, but as I went to eat the second one, a very small hermit crab got up from where it had
been lurking under the oyster, and walked off the plate. Surprised, I pointed this out to my
companion, who then explained that the oysters I was eating were in fact still alive, and you could
see them contract when you squirted lemon juice over them. Didn't put me off then, doesn't put me
off now. At least I know they're fresh if they're still moving!

Quite honestly, I thought this was normal....isn't it?

Jo

---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.580 / Virus Database: 367 - Release Date: 06/02/04
 
K

Katra

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (MrAoD) wrote:

> (NTANTIQUES) writes:
>
> >Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for Valentine's dinner w/DH. Have
> >been enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years, but got the mean crawlies tonight. As I
> >went to spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No matter what you've been drinking,
> >oysters are not supposed to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy looking creature about
> >1/2 inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully gully in there with
> >my oyster. Can only asume it was a crab who'd molted and was using the $1.00 ea. oyster as a
> >temporary home. I realize that oysters are vulnerable to a variety of other sea life, but I've
> >never heard of anyone finding anything inside an oyster shell other than grit or a pearl. Anyway,
> >I tossed it and was a bit hesitant when I picked up the next oyster...damned if there wasn't
> >another creepy critter in that one too. So much for oysters...the rest of 'em went into the
> >garbage & we had to make do with chocolate. NT
>
> Shame.
>
> http://eat.epicurious.com/dictionary/food/index.ssf?DEF_ID=3005
>
> Best,
>
> Marc

Wow. That was a kewl link. ;-) Think I'd draw the line tho' at eating live and wriggling ones!

And I eat steak tartar....... I just have limits. It's, like, gotta be dead at least! LOL!

K.

--
Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
 
F

Frogleg

Guest
On 15 Feb 2004 09:37:30 GMT, [email protected] (MrAoD) wrote:

>(NTANTIQUES) writes:
>
>>Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for Valentine's
<snip>
>>creature about 1/2 inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully gully
>>in there with my oyster.

>>rest of 'em went into the garbage & we had to make do with chocolate.

>
>Shame.
>
>http://eat.epicurious.com/dictionary/food/index.ssf?DEF_ID=3005

I still don't fancy 'em, but got laughed at the first time I recoiled from a tiny crab inside an
oyster shell. They are considered a delicacy, cooked or raw.

And raw oysters are *supposed* to be alive when you eat them. And why shucking them is such a pain
-- the critters are hanging onto their shells. If the shells aren't tightly closed, the oyster is
dead. *Those* are the ones you put in the garbage.
 
K

Kilikini

Guest
"Katra" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
> (NTANTIQUES) wrote:
>
> > Snagged some Blue Point oysters

(snip)

>> A pale, fat, wormy looking creature about 1/2
> > inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully gully in there with my
> > oyster.

(snip)

> Ew.
>
> One more good reason to never eat raw oysters. ;-) I bread them in cornmeal and deep fry them!
>
> Raw oyster. Ew.
>
> K.
>
> --
> Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...
>
> >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
>
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid =katra

K,

Have you ever had them grilled? My brother takes the oyster and drowns it in garlic butter, adds
some breadcrumbs, some grated mozzarella and some chives and grills them up. They have a wonderfully
smokey flavor and are, oh, so tasty!

kili
 
J

Jmcquown

Guest
kilikini wrote:
> "NTANTIQUES" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> m23.aol.com...
>> Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for Valentine's dinner w/DH. Have
>> been enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years, but got the mean crawlies tonight. As I
>> went to spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No matter what you've been drinking,
>> oysters are not supposed to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy looking creature about
>> 1/2 inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully gully in there with
>> my oyster. Can only asume it was a crab who'd molted and was using the $1.00 ea. oyster as a
>> temporary home. I realize that oysters are vulnerable to a variety of other sea life, but I've
>> never heard of anyone finding anything inside an oyster shell other than grit or a pearl. Anyway,
>> I tossed it and was a bit hesitant when I picked up the next oyster...damned if there wasn't
>> another creepy critter in that one too. So much for oysters...the rest of 'em went into the
>> garbage & we had to make do with chocolate. NT
>
> Oh my God! That's one of the worst stories I've ever heard! But, on a good note, chocolate isn't a
> bad thing...... kilikini

NOTE: Chocolate is on sale everywhere as this is the day *after* Valentine's Day!
 
K

Katra

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, "Orion" <[email protected]>
wrote:

> This from NT...
>
> > Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for
> Valentine's dinner w/DH. Have been enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years, but got the
> mean crawlies tonight. As I went to spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No matter what
> you've been drinking, oysters are not supposed to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy
> looking creature about 1/2 inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the
> hully gully in there with my oyster. So much for oysters...
>
> the rest of 'em went into the garbage & we had to make do with chocolate.
> > NT
>
> **************************
> I may never eat again......................
>
> Susan

If only we were Klingons...... ;-D

K.

--
Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
 
J

Jmcquown

Guest
Darkginger wrote:
> jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote
>>
>> EWWWWW! This is why I don't eat raw *anything*. But seriously, I have no idea what those critters
>> were. Never heard of such a thing.
>
> The first time I ever ate an oyster (20+ years ago) was in Fécamp, France. The first one was
> wonderful, but as I went to eat the second one, a very small hermit crab got up from where it had
> been lurking under the oyster, and walked off the plate. Surprised, I pointed this out to my
> companion, who then explained that the oysters I was eating were in fact still alive, and you
> could see them contract when you squirted lemon juice over them. Didn't put me off then, doesn't
> put me off now. At least I know they're fresh if they're still moving!
>
> Quite honestly, I thought this was normal....isn't it?
>
> Jo

I don't think hermit crabs qualify as "wormy looking creatures" but maybe I'm wrong. Either way, I
don't want to eat it or anything like it :)

Jill
 
K

Katra

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Darkginger" <[email protected]> wrote:

> jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote
> >
> > EWWWWW! This is why I don't eat raw *anything*. But seriously, I have no idea what those
> > critters were. Never heard of such a thing.
>
> The first time I ever ate an oyster (20+ years ago) was in Fécamp, France. The first one was
> wonderful, but as I went to eat the second one, a very small hermit crab got up from where it had
> been lurking under the oyster, and walked off the plate. Surprised, I pointed this out to my
> companion, who then explained that the oysters I was eating were in fact still alive, and you
> could see them contract when you squirted lemon juice over them. Didn't put me off then, doesn't
> put me off now. At least I know they're fresh if they're still moving!
>
> Quite honestly, I thought this was normal....isn't it?
>
> Jo
>
>

Ew.

K.

--
Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
 
J

Jmcquown

Guest
Frogleg wrote:
> On 15 Feb 2004 09:37:30 GMT, [email protected] (MrAoD) wrote:
>
>> (NTANTIQUES) writes:
>>
>>> Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for Valentine's <snip> creature
>>> about 1/2 inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully gully in
>>> there with my oyster.
>
>>> rest of 'em went into the garbage & we had to make do with chocolate.
>
>>
>> Shame.
>>
>> http://eat.epicurious.com/dictionary/food/index.ssf?DEF_ID=3005
>
> I still don't fancy 'em, but got laughed at the first time I recoiled from a tiny crab inside an
> oyster shell. They are considered a delicacy, cooked or raw.
>
> And raw oysters are *supposed* to be alive when you eat them. And why shucking them is such a pain
> -- the critters are hanging onto their shells. If the shells aren't tightly closed, the oyster is
> dead. *Those* are the ones you put in the garbage.

Got myself a nasty knife cut shucking oysters once, and yes I was wearing a glove. Yes, they are
supposed to be alive but I don't fancy eating anything still moving.

Where my parents live in the South Carolina low country when the tide goes out you can literally
see the oysters in their beds and hear them 'clicking'. Dad used to wade out and pick them. I'd
never eat one.

Jill
 
L

Loki

Guest
il Sun, 15 Feb 2004 03:56:21 -0600, "jmcquown" ha scritto: [snip]
> I don't think hermit crabs qualify as "wormy looking creatures" but maybe I'm wrong. Either way, I
> don't want to eat it or anything like it :)
>
> Jill

I'm with you. I did find this on the net though.

"Frequently, the novice oyster shucker will encounter a golden-brown "worm" within the oyster's
body. The initial reaction is to throw the oyster away, thinking it is parasitized. However, the
"worm" is an enzyme complex formed by the oyster itself when it has been actively feeding. Thus, it
could be considered a mark of freshness. Red and green worms that live outside the oyster's shell
sometimes wander across the shucked oyster meat. They may be startling, but should not interfere
with the enjoyment of the meal." It came from this page:
http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/fish/specinfo/oyster/oystbro.htm

--
Cheers, Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>"Orion" says:
>
>This from NT...
>
>> Snagged some Blue Point oysters at a reliable upscale market for
>Valentine's dinner w/DH. Have been enjoying these raw on the halfshell for 40 years, but got the
>mean crawlies tonight. As I went to spear a nice plump oyster, I noticed movement. No matter what
>you've been drinking, oysters are not supposed to wriggle. Not a good thing. A pale, fat, wormy
>looking creature about 1/2 inch long with pale, almost invisable crab-like legs was doing the hully
>gully in there with my oyster. So much for oysters...
>
>the rest of 'em went into the garbage & we had to make do with chocolate.
>> NT
>
>**************************
>I may never eat again......................
>
>Susan

Search: <Stylochus ellipticus>

http://www.mdsg.umd.edu/oysters/garden/care.html

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."