cross component recommendations, please

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Kyle Legate, Sep 11, 2004.

  1. Kyle Legate

    Kyle Legate Guest

    Hi, I'm considering buying my first cross bike so I can continue to ride
    through the winter, and get in some trail riding for some variety. My local
    dealer builds cross bikes from Alan frames (www.alan-bikeframes.com) but
    before I buy one I'd appreciate any comments from people who have ridden
    these cross frames. Also, I'd like some recommendations on which components
    I should hang off this frame. I'm not planning to race cross for at least a
    couple of years so I don't need high end components; durability is higher on
    my list than light weight.

    Thanks.
     
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  2. Kyle Legate wrote:

    > Hi, I'm considering buying my first cross bike so I can continue to ride
    > through the winter, and get in some trail riding for some variety. My local
    > dealer builds cross bikes from Alan frames (www.alan-bikeframes.com) but
    > before I buy one I'd appreciate any comments from people who have ridden
    > these cross frames. Also, I'd like some recommendations on which components
    > I should hang off this frame. I'm not planning to race cross for at least a
    > couple of years so I don't need high end components; durability is higher on
    > my list than light weight.


    If cyclocross competition was your only intent, one of these would
    probably do nicely, but these are race-specific frames, not well suited
    to the application you describe, mainly because theyr're not designed to
    accept fenders.

    Proper fenders make a HUGE difference in comfort and clenliness when you
    ride in sloppy conditions, and it's idiotic to design a cyclocross frame
    that won't accept them.

    It doesn't make the bike a bit faster to omit fender and rack attachment
    points, just makes it less useful in the name of fashion.

    Consider something like the Surly Cross-Check instead, I think this
    would be much more appropriate for the use you describe.

    Sheldon "Versatility Is Good" Brown
    +--------------------------------------------+
    | All the world's a stage and most of us |
    | are desperately unrehearsed. |
    | --Sean O'Casey |
    +--------------------------------------------+
    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    http://harriscyclery.com
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  3. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    Sheldon Brown wrote:
    > Kyle Legate wrote:
    >
    >> (www.alan-bikeframes.com)

    >
    > If cyclocross competition was your only intent, one of these would
    > probably do nicely, but these are race-specific frames, not well suited
    > to the application you describe, mainly because theyr're not designed to
    > accept fenders.
    >
    > Proper fenders make a HUGE difference in comfort and clenliness when you
    > ride in sloppy conditions, and it's idiotic to design a cyclocross frame
    > that won't accept them.
    >
    > It doesn't make the bike a bit faster to omit fender and rack attachment
    > points, just makes it less useful in the name of fashion.


    From the website:
    "Upon request, bottle, rack and fender braze-ons are available without
    extra charge."
     
  4. ari

    ari Guest

    Kyle Legate wrote:

    > Hi, I'm considering buying my first cross bike so I can continue to ride
    > through the winter, and get in some trail riding for some variety. My local
    > dealer builds cross bikes from Alan frames (www.alan-bikeframes.com) but
    > before I buy one I'd appreciate any comments from people who have ridden
    > these cross frames. Also, I'd like some recommendations on which components
    > I should hang off this frame. I'm not planning to race cross for at least a
    > couple of years so I don't need high end components; durability is higher on
    > my list than light weight.
    >
    > Thanks.




    if it were me looking for a cross bike with durability over weight, I
    would skip the alan frames which are kind of weird (aluminum or carbon
    tubes glued together with lugs), and look into cheap chinese titanium:

    http://www.habcycles.com/cross.html

    from here you would add campy ergo chorus 9 speed, a set of nice wheels,
    a nice handlebar (like ritchey biomax) and call it a job well done.
     
  5. ari

    ari Guest

    Kyle Legate wrote:

    > Hi, I'm considering buying my first cross bike so I can continue to ride
    > through the winter, and get in some trail riding for some variety. My local
    > dealer builds cross bikes from Alan frames (www.alan-bikeframes.com) but
    > before I buy one I'd appreciate any comments from people who have ridden
    > these cross frames. Also, I'd like some recommendations on which components
    > I should hang off this frame. I'm not planning to race cross for at least a
    > couple of years so I don't need high end components; durability is higher on
    > my list than light weight.
    >
    > Thanks.




    if it were me looking for a cross bike with durability over weight, I
    would skip the alan frames which are kind of weird (aluminum or carbon
    tubes glued together with lugs), and look into cheap chinese titanium:

    http://www.habcycles.com/cross.html

    from here you would add campy ergo chorus 9 speed, a set of nice wheels,
    a nice handlebar (like ritchey biomax) and call it a job well done.
     
  6. Sheldon Brown wrote:

    > If cyclocross competition was your only intent, one of these would
    > probably do nicely, but these are race-specific frames, not well suited
    > to the application you describe, mainly because theyr're not designed to
    > accept fenders.
    >
    > Proper fenders make a HUGE difference in comfort and clenliness when you
    > ride in sloppy conditions, and it's idiotic to design a cyclocross frame
    > that won't accept them.


    I know pro crossers get a fresh bike every lap, but wouldn't fenders (or
    the British "mudguards", which seems a more appropriate term in this
    context), cause terrible clogging problems?

    I have memories of trying to ride a touring bike down a bridleway in my
    youth and grinding to a halt after 100 yards because of mud accumulating
    between the wheels and mudguards. The clearances weren't especially
    close, but clay is evil stuff.

    I'd not have a touring bike without fenders (a la Fuji) though!
     
  7. I wrote:
    >
    >> If cyclocross competition was your only intent, one of these would
    >> probably do nicely, but these are race-specific frames, not well
    >> suited to the application you describe, mainly because theyr're not
    >> designed to accept fenders.
    >> Proper fenders make a HUGE difference in comfort and clenliness when
    >> you ride in sloppy conditions, and it's idiotic to design a cyclocross
    >> frame that won't accept them.

    >

    Zog undeniably wrote:
    >
    > I know pro crossers get a fresh bike every lap, but wouldn't fenders (or
    > the British "mudguards", which seems a more appropriate term in this
    > context), cause terrible clogging problems?


    I wasn't recommending them for cyclocross competition, but for general
    winter riding.
    >
    > I have memories of trying to ride a touring bike down a bridleway in my
    > youth and grinding to a halt after 100 yards because of mud accumulating
    > between the wheels and mudguards. The clearances weren't especially
    > close, but clay is evil stuff.


    Clay is a special case. When I lived in France, I had this problem with
    the old French Gnome-Rhone 650B machine I had rigged as a quasi-VTT. It
    had alumin(i)um gardes boues and some of the trails I liked to ride were
    a mixture of clay and 2000 years of accumulated horse manure, an
    unbelievably cohesive sort of mud. I was once brought to a standstill
    on a very steep descent by this during the rainy season.

    Sheldon "Boue" Brown
    +----------------------------------------------+
    | Ask the travelled inhabitant of any nation |
    | "In what country on earth would you rather |
    | live?" |
    | "Certainly in my own, where are all my |
    | friends, my relations, and the earliest |
    | recollections of my life." |
    | "Which would be your second choice?" |
    | "FRANCE !!" --Jefferson 1821 |
    +----------------------------------------------+
    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    http://harriscyclery.com
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  8. Horse DeLay

    Horse DeLay Guest

    I like
    - Time ATAC pedals: usually easier to clip in, and have a good
    platform when you do have trouble.

    - bar-end shifters: more reliable, lighter, less expensive if you
    crash and break 'em

    - 39-46 chainring combo and 12-28 cogset.

    - tubular rims w/ tufos

    - third eye chain guard

    If you have to carry your bike across three or four times a lap,
    lighter is better than heavier.
     
  9. "Kyle Legate" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Hi, I'm considering buying my first cross bike so I can continue to ride
    > through the winter, and get in some trail riding for some variety. My local
    > dealer builds cross bikes from Alan frames (www.alan-bikeframes.com) but
    > before I buy one I'd appreciate any comments from people who have ridden
    > these cross frames. Also, I'd like some recommendations on which components
    > I should hang off this frame. I'm not planning to race cross for at least a
    > couple of years so I don't need high end components; durability is higher on
    > my list than light weight.


    Read Adam Myerson's articles on cross bike setup:

    http://www.cycle-smart.com/coaching/articles.shtml
    http://www.cycle-smart.com/coaching/articles/crossbike1.shtml

    Make sure you get a bike that gives enough standover clearance
    and at the same time allows you to get the bars up high enough -
    you will probably want the bars higher than a road position.
    Many cross frames have higher BBs than road bikes, which can make
    both standover and higher bar position difficult to achieve. Watch
    out for purist European-style cross frames that may have small tire
    clearance, no bottle cage brazeons, etc.

    Components - dunno, anything you don't mind getting mud in and
    eventually replacing. You will probably want a crankset that
    allows rings lower than 39. I like the Time ATAC pedals, SPDs
    clog up.

    Other cross necessities:
    Cowbell
    Beer
    Duct tape

    Ben
    p.s. the duct tape is for your shoes, you filthy minded preverts.
     
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