Cross Country Ski Simulator: Does it work?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Jan 5, 2006.

  1. Does anybody have experience with this product? (Or any similar produc)
    Fitness Quest Edge 450 Skier
    Edge 450 Cross Country Ski Simulator
    http://store.yahoo.com/comfortforless/ed450skbyfiq.html

    I would like to loose a few vanity pounds 10-15 pinds and is
    considering buying this equipment. But I am unable to find many reviews
    about this equipment online. I have many questions about this product
    and any information regarding it would be greatly appreciated.

    1. My whole apartment is carpeted. Is this equipment stable if placed
    on top of a carpet? Looks like it is standing on four thin legs. I
    don't want to fall down and cause more problems than I have now.

    2. I am not looking for a major weight loss. Something in the range of
    10-15 pounds would be more than enough for me. But whole body exercise
    is important to me. Does it exercise both the upper(chest), middle
    (belly) and lower body?

    3. Are there any similar equipment that could provide both upper and
    lower body exercise? It should not be too advanced (like bowflex) or
    too pricy.

    Thank you all for your expert advice.

    Thanks
    Congace
     
    Tags:


  2. Lee Michaels

    Lee Michaels Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Does anybody have experience with this product? (Or any similar produc)
    > Fitness Quest Edge 450 Skier
    > Edge 450 Cross Country Ski Simulator
    > http://store.yahoo.com/comfortforless/ed450skbyfiq.html
    >
    > I would like to loose a few vanity pounds 10-15 pinds and is
    > considering buying this equipment. But I am unable to find many reviews
    > about this equipment online. I have many questions about this product
    > and any information regarding it would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > 1. My whole apartment is carpeted. Is this equipment stable if placed
    > on top of a carpet? Looks like it is standing on four thin legs. I
    > don't want to fall down and cause more problems than I have now.
    >
    > 2. I am not looking for a major weight loss. Something in the range of
    > 10-15 pounds would be more than enough for me. But whole body exercise
    > is important to me. Does it exercise both the upper(chest), middle
    > (belly) and lower body?
    >
    > 3. Are there any similar equipment that could provide both upper and
    > lower body exercise? It should not be too advanced (like bowflex) or
    > too pricy.
    >
    > Thank you all for your expert advice.
    >
    > Thanks
    > Congace
    >

    At that price, it is a piece of junk.

    The original cross country ski trainer is the Nordic Track. The Nordic
    Track is a quality unit.

    But it takes a particular type of person to use one of these things. I could
    never get the hang of it. Other people love them and swear by them. It might
    be an idea to find one and try it out before you buy. See if this particular
    form of exercise agrees with you.

    http://www.nordictrack.com

    And for that kind of money, you might consider an elliptical trainer. They
    are a lot easier to use for many people.

    Also, you might look for a used one. They are a lot cheaper that way.
     
  3. Stephen

    Stephen Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Does anybody have experience with this product? (Or any similar produc)
    > Fitness Quest Edge 450 Skier
    > Edge 450 Cross Country Ski Simulator
    > http://store.yahoo.com/comfortforless/ed450skbyfiq.html
    >
    > I would like to loose a few vanity pounds 10-15 pinds and is
    > considering buying this equipment.


    It actually doesn't look like much a machine. It's pretty cheap and
    looks even cheaper. This will not do anything for you that walking
    cannot accomplish. There are a gazillion of those things, barely used
    for sale at any time. That is because the machine doesn't do anything
    for you unless you use it. Most people just won't.

    If you want to drop a couple hundred bucks, thin about finding a nice
    gym and buy a short term membership. They will have a room full of
    machines worth thousands apiece and you can use any or all of them.
    There are also lots of nice people there with the same goals as you and
    that can really be a help.

    If you feel that you are going to stay with it, I'm pretty sure you will
    find the cost of a gym to be a non issue. You should also be doing some
    strength exercise as well and the ski machine, or walking for that
    matter doesn't do much for you in that way.

    Most gyms will give you a free week to try it out. Maybe go through a
    few to give yourself more time to see if a gym is for you and to find
    one that you like. If you really don't want to try a gym or have and
    really don't like it may not be for you. You can put that money into a
    great pair of shoes and walk instead. It really doesn't matter much
    what you do, it matters most that you find something that you like to do
    and keep doing it.

    Having said all that, even if you do get yourself into the routine of
    exercising, whether with the ski machine, gym or pair of shoes, this is
    not the key to weight loss. You still need to evaluate your eating plan
    and get that under control. You'd be surprised at how much exercise it
    takes to overcome the calories from a snack that you didn't need.

    Make it your goal for the next while to learn things that will help you
    achieve your goal and then do them. Eat right, exercise, and sleep.
    That's a hard combo to beat.

    Good luck,

    Stephen Nishio
     
  4. JMW

    JMW Guest

    "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Does anybody have experience with this product? (Or any similar produc)
    >> Fitness Quest Edge 450 Skier
    >> Edge 450 Cross Country Ski Simulator
    >> http://store.yahoo.com/comfortforless/ed450skbyfiq.html
    >>
    >> I would like to loose a few vanity pounds 10-15 pinds and is
    >> considering buying this equipment. But I am unable to find many reviews
    >> about this equipment online. I have many questions about this product
    >> and any information regarding it would be greatly appreciated.
    >>
    >> 1. My whole apartment is carpeted. Is this equipment stable if placed
    >> on top of a carpet? Looks like it is standing on four thin legs. I
    >> don't want to fall down and cause more problems than I have now.
    >>
    >> 2. I am not looking for a major weight loss. Something in the range of
    >> 10-15 pounds would be more than enough for me. But whole body exercise
    >> is important to me. Does it exercise both the upper(chest), middle
    >> (belly) and lower body?
    >>
    >> 3. Are there any similar equipment that could provide both upper and
    >> lower body exercise? It should not be too advanced (like bowflex) or
    >> too pricy.
    >>
    >> Thank you all for your expert advice.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> Congace
    >>

    >At that price, it is a piece of junk.
    >
    >The original cross country ski trainer is the Nordic Track. The Nordic
    >Track is a quality unit.
    >
    >But it takes a particular type of person to use one of these things. I could
    >never get the hang of it. Other people love them and swear by them. It might
    >be an idea to find one and try it out before you buy. See if this particular
    >form of exercise agrees with you.
    >
    >http://www.nordictrack.com
    >
    >And for that kind of money, you might consider an elliptical trainer. They
    >are a lot easier to use for many people.
    >
    >Also, you might look for a used one. They are a lot cheaper that way.


    Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    the hang of it, either.

    Ellipticals are nice, but the commercial-grade ones are a lot easier
    to use than the cheap ones ... less noisy, too.
     
  5. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > At that price, it is a piece of junk.
    >
    > The original cross country ski trainer is the Nordic Track. The Nordic
    > Track is a quality unit.


    I agree with you there. Some years ago, I bought a piece of junk. I didn't
    realize at the time that there was a big difference between what I bought
    and the Nordic Track. And that difference is that the arm and foot portions
    of a Nordic Track work independently of each other. The unit I bought had
    the foot portion hooked up to the arm portion. So as you moved your arms
    back and forth, your legs sort of went along for the ride! It made me work
    up a horrible sweat and perhaps gave my upper body a bit of a workout, but
    certainly far less of a workout than I could get with my cheap dumbells.
    Did nothing whatever for my legs, lower body or waist.

    I bought the specific unit I had because it was supposed to be able to fold
    down and slide under the bed. As it turned out, it didn't exactly fold
    down. In order to slide it under the bed, you had to take off a bunch of
    pieces and then slide this one piece down. You also needed a bed on risers
    to be able to do this. It took up a lot of floor space. Floor space I
    didn't have! You can't just go by the measurements, because there are those
    things that go shooting out from the front and the back of it. You need a
    very large room to put it in, and wherever it is, it will be the focal point
    of the room.
    >
    > But it takes a particular type of person to use one of these things. I

    could
    > never get the hang of it. Other people love them and swear by them. It

    might
    > be an idea to find one and try it out before you buy. See if this

    particular
    > form of exercise agrees with you.
    >
    > http://www.nordictrack.com
    >
    > And for that kind of money, you might consider an elliptical trainer.

    They
    > are a lot easier to use for many people.
    >
    > Also, you might look for a used one. They are a lot cheaper that way.


    I used to work with a woman who swore by her Nordic Track. It didn't cause
    her to lose any weight. But she didn't buy it for that. She did cross
    country skiing in the winter and was looking for something to keep her in
    shape the rest of the year.

    I have heard good things about elliptical trainers, but I've never tried
    one.

    --
    See my webpage:
    http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm
     
  6. Stephen

    Stephen Guest

    JMW wrote:

    > Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    > the hang of it, either.
    >
    > Ellipticals are nice, but the commercial-grade ones are a lot easier
    > to use than the cheap ones ... less noisy, too.


    I've come to the conclusion that any exercise machine - treadmill,
    elliptical, stairclimber, whatever, that is less than a few grand is not
    worth using. It's is most likely going to be so crappy that only a very
    dedicated person will stay with it. I hate using shitty equipment.
    Like I mentioned earlier, I have to use crappy stuff in a pinch
    sometimes when I am in hotels out of town.

    I love to train and I know if I find it tough to use that junk, it will
    be twice as discouraging to someone who is not as much in the habit of
    exercising to get with it and stay with it.

    One hotel gym actually had pink plastic 2lb dumbells. I almost stole
    one for a souvenir. I haven't seen one of those in decades.

    Stephen N.
     
  7. John Hanson

    John Hanson Guest

    On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 00:47:41 -0500, JMW <[email protected]> wrote in
    misc.fitness.weights:

    >"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>


    >>
    >>But it takes a particular type of person to use one of these things. I could
    >>never get the hang of it. Other people love them and swear by them. It might
    >>be an idea to find one and try it out before you buy. See if this particular
    >>form of exercise agrees with you.


    >
    >Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    >the hang of it, either.
    >


    You two don't have enough Scandinavian blood in you:)

    Then again, I tried it for about 60 seconds once and couldn't get the
    hang of it either and I'm full-blooded Norwegian.
     
  8. Lee Michaels

    Lee Michaels Guest

    "Stephen" wrote
    > JMW wrote:
    >
    >> Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    >> the hang of it, either.
    >>
    >> Ellipticals are nice, but the commercial-grade ones are a lot easier
    >> to use than the cheap ones ... less noisy, too.

    >
    > I've come to the conclusion that any exercise machine - treadmill,
    > elliptical, stairclimber, whatever, that is less than a few grand is not
    > worth using. It's is most likely going to be so crappy that only a very
    > dedicated person will stay with it. I hate using shitty equipment.
    > Like I mentioned earlier, I have to use crappy stuff in a pinch sometimes
    > when I am in hotels out of town.
    >


    Damn Steve, that is an attitude I like.

    I am often asked to consult on putting somebody's home gum together. It is
    amazing the bullshit I hear from these folks who think that they can put a
    home gym together for less than they spend on dinner or night out.

    And simce I have heard the routine so many times before, I am rather
    impatient with them too. I ask them how much money they spent on their
    house, education, medical expenses, cars, hobbies, etc. Then I ask them if
    they realistically thought that they could get a good cardio machine for
    $150. And if sliding it under the bed was a good design criteria?

    People shop for gym equipment like throw pillows for the sofa. The idea
    that they are entrusting their flesh to a pile of junk just doesn't occur to
    them.
     
  9. Lee Michaels

    Lee Michaels Guest

    "John Hanson" wrote

    > JMW wrote
    >
    >>"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>But it takes a particular type of person to use one of these things. I
    >>>could
    >>>never get the hang of it. Other people love them and swear by them. It
    >>>might
    >>>be an idea to find one and try it out before you buy. See if this
    >>>particular
    >>>form of exercise agrees with you.

    >
    >>
    >>Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    >>the hang of it, either.
    >>

    >
    > You two don't have enough Scandinavian blood in you:)
    >
    > Then again, I tried it for about 60 seconds once and couldn't get the
    > hang of it either and I'm full-blooded Norwegian.


    Mr Hanson, what a macho man, spent a whole sixty seconds on the machine!!

    I bought one, brand new. Paid full price for it. And I tried to use that
    thing again and again for years!! I got so I could elevate my heart rate on
    it. But it was never comfortable or fun for me. Finally sold it to a cross
    country skier. They love these things.

    The skier made an interesting comment to me when he bought it. He said that
    when he first starting cross country skiing, he got tired fast. But as he
    did it more, he realized that the neuro component was a definite part of the
    fatigue. As he did more and more of it, it became easier for him.

    He also said that he tried to use the nordic track years before and could
    never master it. But after learning to ski on real skis, on real snow, the
    nordic track became easy for him.
     
  10. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 00:47:41 -0500, JMW <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> Does anybody have experience with this product? (Or any similar produc)
    >>> Fitness Quest Edge 450 Skier
    >>> Edge 450 Cross Country Ski Simulator
    >>> http://store.yahoo.com/comfortforless/ed450skbyfiq.html
    >>>
    >>> I would like to loose a few vanity pounds 10-15 pinds and is
    >>> considering buying this equipment. But I am unable to find many reviews
    >>> about this equipment online. I have many questions about this product
    >>> and any information regarding it would be greatly appreciated.
    >>>
    >>> 1. My whole apartment is carpeted. Is this equipment stable if placed
    >>> on top of a carpet? Looks like it is standing on four thin legs. I
    >>> don't want to fall down and cause more problems than I have now.
    >>>
    >>> 2. I am not looking for a major weight loss. Something in the range of
    >>> 10-15 pounds would be more than enough for me. But whole body exercise
    >>> is important to me. Does it exercise both the upper(chest), middle
    >>> (belly) and lower body?
    >>>
    >>> 3. Are there any similar equipment that could provide both upper and
    >>> lower body exercise? It should not be too advanced (like bowflex) or
    >>> too pricy.
    >>>
    >>> Thank you all for your expert advice.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks
    >>> Congace
    >>>

    >>At that price, it is a piece of junk.
    >>
    >>The original cross country ski trainer is the Nordic Track. The Nordic
    >>Track is a quality unit.
    >>
    >>But it takes a particular type of person to use one of these things. I could
    >>never get the hang of it. Other people love them and swear by them. It might
    >>be an idea to find one and try it out before you buy. See if this particular
    >>form of exercise agrees with you.
    >>
    >>http://www.nordictrack.com
    >>
    >>And for that kind of money, you might consider an elliptical trainer. They
    >>are a lot easier to use for many people.
    >>
    >>Also, you might look for a used one. They are a lot cheaper that way.

    >
    >Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    >the hang of it, either.
    >
    >Ellipticals are nice, but the commercial-grade ones are a lot easier
    >to use than the cheap ones ... less noisy, too.


    The elliptical cross trainers are probably the best non-impact pieces
    of CV equipment in the multitude of machines available for this
    purpose.

    When I had acute Achilles Tendonitis I was able to continue my CV
    training without interruption using such a machine.

    I agree that the home models are really not a patch on those used in
    commercial gyms.
     
  11. John Hanson

    John Hanson Guest

    On Fri, 6 Jan 2006 02:06:08 -0500, "Lee Michaels"
    <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

    >
    >"John Hanson" wrote
    >
    >> JMW wrote
    >>
    >>>"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>But it takes a particular type of person to use one of these things. I
    >>>>could
    >>>>never get the hang of it. Other people love them and swear by them. It
    >>>>might
    >>>>be an idea to find one and try it out before you buy. See if this
    >>>>particular
    >>>>form of exercise agrees with you.

    >>
    >>>
    >>>Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    >>>the hang of it, either.
    >>>

    >>
    >> You two don't have enough Scandinavian blood in you:)
    >>
    >> Then again, I tried it for about 60 seconds once and couldn't get the
    >> hang of it either and I'm full-blooded Norwegian.

    >
    >Mr Hanson, what a macho man, spent a whole sixty seconds on the machine!!
    >
    >I bought one, brand new. Paid full price for it. And I tried to use that
    >thing again and again for years!! I got so I could elevate my heart rate on
    >it. But it was never comfortable or fun for me. Finally sold it to a cross
    >country skier. They love these things.


    Everybody and his brother has one around these parts. Heck, the
    company started here. There are a lot of diehard cross country skiers
    who use them religiously during the non winter months.

    >
    >The skier made an interesting comment to me when he bought it. He said that
    >when he first starting cross country skiing, he got tired fast. But as he
    >did it more, he realized that the neuro component was a definite part of the
    >fatigue. As he did more and more of it, it became easier for him.
    >
    >He also said that he tried to use the nordic track years before and could
    >never master it. But after learning to ski on real skis, on real snow, the
    >nordic track became easy for him.
    >

    I haven't cross country skied since I was a kid when we did it every
    year in elementary school. I enjoyed it and I was good at it which is
    why the Nordic track was so damned frustrating. It may have had to do
    with the tension settings on the machine I tried.
     
  12. Jason Earl

    Jason Earl Guest

    [email protected] writes:

    > Does anybody have experience with this product? (Or any similar
    > produc) Fitness Quest Edge 450 Skier Edge 450 Cross Country Ski
    > Simulator http://store.yahoo.com/comfortforless/ed450skbyfiq.html


    It's possible that this machine might stand up to actual use, but as
    the others have mentioned these sorts of machines can be very
    problematic. If you really want to do cardio I would simply take the
    money you would spend on this gizmo, purchase some running shoes, and
    pocket the difference.

    > I would like to loose a few vanity pounds 10-15 pinds and is
    > considering buying this equipment. But I am unable to find many
    > reviews about this equipment online. I have many questions about
    > this product and any information regarding it would be greatly
    > appreciated.


    If you only need to lose 10-15 pounds then I would suggest something
    more along the lines of Tabata Thrusters

    http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do?article=04-046-training

    or "The Bear"

    http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=459657

    Neither of these exercises requires very much weight. Heck, the
    Tabata thrusters are effective without any weight at all.

    > 1. My whole apartment is carpeted. Is this equipment stable if
    > placed on top of a carpet? Looks like it is standing on four thin
    > legs. I don't want to fall down and cause more problems than I have
    > now.


    I wouldn't buy something like this unless I could try it first.

    > 2. I am not looking for a major weight loss. Something in the range
    > of 10-15 pounds would be more than enough for me. But whole body
    > exercise is important to me. Does it exercise both the upper(chest),
    > middle (belly) and lower body?


    Lifting stuff above your head is good for this sort of thing, as is
    pushing heavy stuff like a car. Another fun full body exercise is
    wheelbarrow races. Not the kind you did as a kid (although those are
    probably good too) but the kind where you take an actual wheelbarrow
    load it up with stuff push it a hundred yards or so, unload it, and
    then start again. I've got a buddy I get together with on occasion
    for this sort of thing, and it's always a blast.

    The point is that you don't need some sort of gizmo to get a good full
    body workout. Chances are good that you have something that would
    work laying around in your apartment.

    > 3. Are there any similar equipment that could provide both upper and
    > lower body exercise? It should not be too advanced (like bowflex) or
    > too pricy.


    You get the most bang per buck from free weights. If you are on a
    budget everything else is a gimmick. You don't even really need a
    bench, just a bar.

    > Thank you all for your expert advice.


    Good luck,
    Jason
     
  13. ATP*

    ATP* Guest

    "Stephen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > JMW wrote:
    >
    >> Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    >> the hang of it, either.
    >>
    >> Ellipticals are nice, but the commercial-grade ones are a lot easier
    >> to use than the cheap ones ... less noisy, too.

    >
    > I've come to the conclusion that any exercise machine - treadmill,
    > elliptical, stairclimber, whatever, that is less than a few grand is not
    > worth using. It's is most likely going to be so crappy that only a very
    > dedicated person will stay with it.


    Concept 2 rowers are only $850. They are worth using.
     
  14. David

    David Guest

    "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Does anybody have experience with this product? (Or any similar produc)
    >> Fitness Quest Edge 450 Skier
    >> Edge 450 Cross Country Ski Simulator
    >> http://store.yahoo.com/comfortforless/ed450skbyfiq.html
    >>
    >> I would like to loose a few vanity pounds 10-15 pinds and is
    >> considering buying this equipment. But I am unable to find many reviews
    >> about this equipment online. I have many questions about this product
    >> and any information regarding it would be greatly appreciated.
    >>
    >> 1. My whole apartment is carpeted. Is this equipment stable if placed
    >> on top of a carpet? Looks like it is standing on four thin legs. I
    >> don't want to fall down and cause more problems than I have now.
    >>
    >> 2. I am not looking for a major weight loss. Something in the range of
    >> 10-15 pounds would be more than enough for me. But whole body exercise
    >> is important to me. Does it exercise both the upper(chest), middle
    >> (belly) and lower body?
    >>
    >> 3. Are there any similar equipment that could provide both upper and
    >> lower body exercise? It should not be too advanced (like bowflex) or
    >> too pricy.
    >>
    >> Thank you all for your expert advice.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> Congace
    >>

    > At that price, it is a piece of junk.
    >
    > The original cross country ski trainer is the Nordic Track. The Nordic
    > Track is a quality unit.


    Nordic Trac has been sold years ago - it is made in China and typical crap


    >
    > But it takes a particular type of person to use one of these things. I
    > could never get the hang of it. Other people love them and swear by them.
    > It might be an idea to find one and try it out before you buy. See if this
    > particular form of exercise agrees with you.
    >
    > http://www.nordictrack.com
    >
    > And for that kind of money, you might consider an elliptical trainer.
    > They are a lot easier to use for many people.
    >
    > Also, you might look for a used one. They are a lot cheaper that way.
     
  15. David

    David Guest

    "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]
    >
    > "Stephen" wrote
    >> JMW wrote:
    >>
    >>> Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    >>> the hang of it, either.
    >>>
    >>> Ellipticals are nice, but the commercial-grade ones are a lot easier
    >>> to use than the cheap ones ... less noisy, too.

    >>
    >> I've come to the conclusion that any exercise machine - treadmill,
    >> elliptical, stairclimber, whatever, that is less than a few grand is not
    >> worth using. It's is most likely going to be so crappy that only a very
    >> dedicated person will stay with it. I hate using shitty equipment.
    >> Like I mentioned earlier, I have to use crappy stuff in a pinch sometimes
    >> when I am in hotels out of town.
    >>

    >
    > Damn Steve, that is an attitude I like.
    >
    > I am often asked to consult on putting somebody's home gum together.


    Maybe you should confine your advice to 'home gum' because you aren't much
    good with home gyms

    >It is
    >amazing the bullshit I hear from these folks who think that they can put a
    > home gym together for less than they spend on dinner or night out.
    >
    > And simce I have heard the routine so many times before, I am rather
    > impatient with them too. I ask them how much money they spent on their
    > house, education, medical expenses, cars, hobbies, etc. Then I ask them
    > if they realistically thought that they could get a good cardio machine
    > for $150. And if sliding it under the bed was a good design criteria?
    >
    > People shop for gym equipment like throw pillows for the sofa. The idea
    > that they are entrusting their flesh to a pile of junk just doesn't occur
    > to them.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  16. David

    David Guest

    "John Hanson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 00:47:41 -0500, JMW <[email protected]> wrote in
    > misc.fitness.weights:
    >
    >>"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>>

    >
    >>>
    >>>But it takes a particular type of person to use one of these things. I
    >>>could
    >>>never get the hang of it. Other people love them and swear by them. It
    >>>might
    >>>be an idea to find one and try it out before you buy. See if this
    >>>particular
    >>>form of exercise agrees with you.

    >
    >>
    >>Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    >>the hang of it, either.
    >>

    >
    > You two don't have enough Scandinavian blood in you:)
    >
    > Then again, I tried it for about 60 seconds once and couldn't get the
    > hang of it either and I'm full-blooded Norwegian.


    Maybe if you were Chinese you'd do better as all Nordic Trac is made in
    China since that company has gone bankrupt a few years ago. They are now
    owned by Icon which is the largest fitness company in the world - known for
    making very ordinary equipment and all is made in China.
     
  17. David

    David Guest

    "David" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "John Hanson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 00:47:41 -0500, JMW <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> misc.fitness.weights:
    >>
    >>>"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>>>

    >>
    >>>>
    >>>>But it takes a particular type of person to use one of these things. I
    >>>>could
    >>>>never get the hang of it. Other people love them and swear by them. It
    >>>>might
    >>>>be an idea to find one and try it out before you buy. See if this
    >>>>particular
    >>>>form of exercise agrees with you.

    >>
    >>>
    >>>Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    >>>the hang of it, either.
    >>>

    >>
    >> You two don't have enough Scandinavian blood in you:)
    >>
    >> Then again, I tried it for about 60 seconds once and couldn't get the
    >> hang of it either and I'm full-blooded Norwegian.

    >
    > Maybe if you were Chinese you'd do better as all Nordic Trac is made in
    > China since that company has gone bankrupt a few years ago. They are now
    > owned by Icon which is the largest fitness company in the world - known
    > for making very ordinary equipment and all is made in China.
    >

    Sorry Proform treadmills is one of their products and that is made in the
    USA - poor quality reputation nevertheless
     
  18. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 10:28:07 GMT, "David" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >news:D[email protected]
    >>
    >> "Stephen" wrote
    >>> JMW wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    >>>> the hang of it, either.
    >>>>
    >>>> Ellipticals are nice, but the commercial-grade ones are a lot easier
    >>>> to use than the cheap ones ... less noisy, too.
    >>>
    >>> I've come to the conclusion that any exercise machine - treadmill,
    >>> elliptical, stairclimber, whatever, that is less than a few grand is not
    >>> worth using. It's is most likely going to be so crappy that only a very
    >>> dedicated person will stay with it. I hate using shitty equipment.
    >>> Like I mentioned earlier, I have to use crappy stuff in a pinch sometimes
    >>> when I am in hotels out of town.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Damn Steve, that is an attitude I like.
    >>
    >> I am often asked to consult on putting somebody's home gum together.

    >
    >Maybe you should confine your advice to 'home gum' because you aren't much
    >good with home gyms


    That will give him something to chew over, as he can masticate gum
    while he's bumping his gums about gyms.
     
  19. David

    David Guest

    "JRH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 10:28:07 GMT, "David" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >>news:D[email protected]
    >>>
    >>> "Stephen" wrote
    >>>> JMW wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Years ago, I tried to use the Nordic Track at my gym. I couldn't get
    >>>>> the hang of it, either.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Ellipticals are nice, but the commercial-grade ones are a lot easier
    >>>>> to use than the cheap ones ... less noisy, too.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've come to the conclusion that any exercise machine - treadmill,
    >>>> elliptical, stairclimber, whatever, that is less than a few grand is
    >>>> not
    >>>> worth using. It's is most likely going to be so crappy that only a
    >>>> very
    >>>> dedicated person will stay with it. I hate using shitty equipment.
    >>>> Like I mentioned earlier, I have to use crappy stuff in a pinch
    >>>> sometimes
    >>>> when I am in hotels out of town.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Damn Steve, that is an attitude I like.
    >>>
    >>> I am often asked to consult on putting somebody's home gum together.

    >>
    >>Maybe you should confine your advice to 'home gum' because you aren't much
    >>good with home gyms

    >
    > That will give him something to chew over, as he can masticate gum
    > while he's bumping his gums about gyms.


    Be careful. You might go back in the bozo bin
     
  20. Not

    Not Guest

    On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 10:26:01 GMT, "David" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Nordic Trac has been sold years ago - it is made in China and typical crap


    Just goes to show what a imbecile you are. Nordic Trac makes a lot of
    GREAT machines. We have an eliptical trainer 910. It's 4 years old,
    gets used a minimum of an hour a day by my daughter, plus an hour a
    day by me during the winter months. We bought it used from Sears where
    it had been returned for one reason or another, then resold at several
    hundred dollars less with ful warranty. It's never given us any
    problems at all.
    Try talking about something you ACTUALLY know something about moron.
     
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