Crossing Freeway Exits



G

Gags

Guest
When I was in Sydney a few years ago I used to do quite a bit of riding
along the M5 between Campbelltown and Bankstown. It used to be great as I
was training for Triathlons and it was pretty flat so that using the Tri
Bars was possible pretty well all of the time. I never used to use the
"Cyclists Cross Here" part of the exit lane as that involved slowing down,
checking for traffic, then crossing.....instead I used to hug the dotted
line and was pretty well of the mindset that cars behind me would see me in
plenty of time to either exit in front or behind me (this is a 100km/h
zone).

The other day I was travelling on the freeway here in Melbourne and I saw an
impatient driver in front of me who was right up the back of a large truck
in the left hand lane (I mean close enough that if he were on a bike he
would be drafting). He evidently was taking the next exit and when he
pulled out from behind the truck to cross the dotted line that was the one
that I used to follow I realised that had there been a cyclist there, he
wouldn't have had a chance. (no cyclists allowed on this freeway though).

It gave me a bit of a shiver down the spine to think of what may have
happened to me simply because I didn't want to slow down for a couple of
seconds to do the right thing.

I hope that anyone else who rides on roads with exit lanes is currently
doing the right thing and if you are not then I would strongly advise that
you do.

Keep Safe,

Gags
 
Gags wrote:
> When I was in Sydney a few years ago I used to do quite a bit of riding
> along the M5 between Campbelltown and Bankstown. It used to be great as
> I was training for Triathlons and it was pretty flat so that using the
> Tri Bars was possible pretty well all of the time. I never used to use
> the "Cyclists Cross Here" part of the exit lane as that involved slowing
> down, checking for traffic, then crossing.....instead I used to hug the
> dotted line and was pretty well of the mindset that cars behind me would
> see me in plenty of time to either exit in front or behind me (this is a
> 100km/h zone).
> The other day I was travelling on the freeway here in Melbourne and I
> saw an impatient driver in front of me who was right up the back of a
> large truck in the left hand lane (I mean close enough that if he were
> on a bike he would be drafting). He evidently was taking the next exit
> and when he pulled out from behind the truck to cross the dotted line
> that was the one that I used to follow I realised that had there been a
> cyclist there, he wouldn't have had a chance. (no cyclists allowed on
> this freeway though).
> It gave me a bit of a shiver down the spine to think of what may have
> happened to me simply because I didn't want to slow down for a couple of
> seconds to do the right thing.
> I hope that anyone else who rides on roads with exit lanes is currently
> doing the right thing and if you are not then I would strongly advise
> that you do.
> Keep Safe,
> Gags



Its a terrible thought! Seeing things like that really shake me up

My neighbour's husband was killed several years ago in very simila
circumstances. Witnessing the way people drive on freeways and highways
I don't think I could enjoy riding in such an environment

Tro


-
 
"Gags" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> When I was in Sydney a few years ago I used to do quite a bit of riding
> along the M5 between Campbelltown and Bankstown. It used to be great as I
> was training for Triathlons and it was pretty flat so that using the Tri
> Bars was possible pretty well all of the time. I never used to use the
> "Cyclists Cross Here" part of the exit lane as that involved slowing down,
> checking for traffic, then crossing.....instead I used to hug the dotted
> line and was pretty well of the mindset that cars behind me would see me in
> plenty of time to either exit in front or behind me (this is a 100km/h
> zone).
>

[snip]
> Keep Safe,
>
> Gags


I often ride on Sydney's M4 and M2 (where allowed) and I always treat
freeway exits and entrances as a "rest section". The speed
differential and traffic volume necessitates looking over the shoulder
for long enough to assess the whether the crossing is clear. Sometimes
you have to really slow down and wait for a gap, especially when
traffic is heavy. These exits are usually at least 1 to 2 km apart,
giving you some nice intervals anyway!

echo the Keep Safe,
Ritch
 
"Gags" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
<snip>
> I hope that anyone else who rides on roads with exit lanes is currently
> doing the right thing and if you are not then I would strongly advise that
> you do.


There is one peice of advice that cannot be understated on Melbourne roads.
Whenever there is a lane branching off to the left cars will almost never
give way to cyclists going straight. I'm a pretty aggresive cyclist
sometimes and I like to push my right of way a bit. I've experimented with
going straight on certain intersections (with an escape route in mind) and
more than half the cars on the road will not recognise your right of way.
I gave up on the side panel bashing and general agro and just decided to
live with it. If more than 50% of people do it you don't have the energy to
be mad with that many people.
Just keep it in mind and try to survive.
 
"Duncan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "Gags" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> <snip>
> > I hope that anyone else who rides on roads with exit lanes is currently
> > doing the right thing and if you are not then I would strongly advise

that
> > you do.

>
> There is one peice of advice that cannot be understated on Melbourne

roads.
> Whenever there is a lane branching off to the left cars will almost never
> give way to cyclists going straight.


Best solution I've found to this is just prior to a left turn slip-lane,
pull out to claim the centre of your lane, or even right of centre. This
puts a stopper on drivers cutting by to overtake, and at the same time opens
up a space for them to move into the LH slip lane. Mind you I am talking
about regular roads here - I don't ride the freeways, in Melbourne. It's
illegal and I'd reckon damned unpleasant.

Cheers
Peter

> I'm a pretty aggresive cyclist
> sometimes and I like to push my right of way a bit. I've experimented

with
> going straight on certain intersections (with an escape route in mind) and
> more than half the cars on the road will not recognise your right of way.
> I gave up on the side panel bashing and general agro and just decided to
> live with it. If more than 50% of people do it you don't have the energy

to
> be mad with that many people.
> Just keep it in mind and try to survive.
>
>
 
"Peter Signorini" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "Duncan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > "Gags" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]...
> > <snip>
> > > I hope that anyone else who rides on roads with exit lanes is

currently
> > > doing the right thing and if you are not then I would strongly advise

> that
> > > you do.

> >
> > There is one peice of advice that cannot be understated on Melbourne

> roads.
> > Whenever there is a lane branching off to the left cars will almost

never
> > give way to cyclists going straight.

>
> Best solution I've found to this is just prior to a left turn slip-lane,
> pull out to claim the centre of your lane, or even right of centre. This
> puts a stopper on drivers cutting by to overtake, and at the same time

opens
> up a space for them to move into the LH slip lane. Mind you I am talking
> about regular roads here - I don't ride the freeways, in Melbourne. It's
> illegal and I'd reckon damned unpleasant.


I'm not talking about freeways, just left turn slip lanes. Some are much
worse than others, the worst are on roads that people drive so often that in
their heads they're not making a left turn but going straight. They also
don't consider passing a bicycle to be an overtaking manouvre.
I sometimes do the move out into the centre, but mainly stick my arm out to
indicate right even though I'm going straight. Seems to get the message
across most of the time but always look over your shoulder for eye contact.
 
Here in Hobart the entrance to the Bowen Bridge from the eastern shor
is an absolute nightmare for cyclists. When travelling from the sout
you are on the left hand side of the road in a single lane. Then on you
left, a second lane starts so that people travelling from the north ca
go around a clover leaf in a single lane and get into the left hand lan
of the double lane road over the bridge

Cyclists can then get stuck in between two lanes of traffic travellin
at around 80 kph. At best the cyclist is doing about 40kph. Th
motorists, once they go from the single lane, are in to the doubl
lane road and are generally looking to jockey for position, especiall
those in the left lane who may have been held up by a slower vehicle
The scenario above of the tailgater pulling over quickly would mea
goodbye cyclist

I predict that one day I will be posting that a cyclist has bee
seriously injured or killed on this ridiculous piece of road desig
(that's if I'm not the one who cops it)

The tragedy of this is that there are numerous such situation
throughout Tasmania on the major highway network


-