crossing pavements on bike? illegal?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Steve, Apr 23, 2003.

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  1. Steve

    Steve Guest

    Hi, I just got back from a morning ride and needed to cross the pavement to get to my flat (on the
    other side of the pavement). So I turned between some of the parked cars and made my way onto the
    pavement (all very routine for me), at which point some old dude shouted at me that riding on the
    pavement was illegal.

    I had some vague notion that if you're just crossing a pavement to get to private premises on the
    other side (like the entrance to my block of flats) then you can ride legally - but maybe I'm wrong:
    the only thing I can find in the highway code re: riding across pavements is section 54:

    "You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement. Do not leave your cycle where it would endanger or obstruct road
    users or pedestrians, for example, lying on the pavement. Use cycle parking facilities where
    provided. "

    http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/03.shtml

    From this, it seems that crossing the pavement isn't legal - but the above does seem more designed
    to apply to people just riding along the pavement - not crossing it.

    Does anyone know what the law is with regards to riding across the pavement, from a road to a
    private residence?

    Thanks

    Steve
     
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  2. In message <[email protected]>, Steve <[email protected]> writes
    >Hi, I just got back from a morning ride and needed to cross the pavement to get to my flat (on the
    >other side of the pavement). So I turned between some of the parked cars and made my way onto the
    >pavement (all very routine for me), at which point some old dude shouted at me that riding on the
    >pavement was illegal.
    >
    >I had some vague notion that if you're just crossing a pavement to get to private premises on the
    >other side (like the entrance to my block of flats) then you can ride legally - but maybe I'm
    >wrong: the only thing I can find in the highway code re: riding across pavements is section 54:
    >
    >"You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement. Do not leave your cycle where it would endanger or obstruct road
    >users or pedestrians, for example, lying on the pavement. Use cycle parking facilities where
    >provided. "
    >
    >http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/03.shtml
    >
    >From this, it seems that crossing the pavement isn't legal - but the above does seem more designed
    >to apply to people just riding along the pavement - not crossing it.
    >
    >Does anyone know what the law is with regards to riding across the pavement, from a road to a
    >private residence?
    >
    >Thanks
    >
    >Steve

    Regardless of the legality I think that your actions are lazy and inconsiderate and further the
    impression of some people that many cyclists are lycra-clad louts. And what relevance is it that the
    'dude' was old? Are you ageist too?
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  3. Cycling *on* the pavement is illegal - so unless you are levitating above it, you are *on* the
    pavement even if you happen to be so for a short period ;-)

    If you are getting access to & from your property via a legitimate access, with a dropped kerb on
    the road side of the pavement, my understanding is you are okay to cross at such a point, but *only*
    at such a point (and I'm sure someone will tell me if I'm in the wrong here), as it's like driving
    your car across the path into a driveway. Otherwise it's wrong and simply adds to the impression
    that cyclists break the law with impunity.

    From your description of turning between parked cars it sounds like you are going on to the pavement
    rather than crossing at a proper access point. Is it difficult to dismount & walk the bike in??

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  4. Frank

    Frank Guest

    "Michael MacClancy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Regardless of the legality I think that your actions are lazy and inconsiderate and further the
    > impression of some people that many cyclists are lycra-clad louts. And what relevance is it that
    > the 'dude' was old? Are you ageist too?
    > --
    Damn right mustn't ride on the pavement, Additionally I also always get out and push my car across
    the pavement to get to my driveway.
     
  5. In message <[email protected]>, Frank <[email protected]> writes
    >Damn right mustn't ride on the pavement, Additionally I also always get out and push my car across
    >the pavement to get to my driveway.

    :) Fair point, but access to your driveway is probably allowed in the
    deeds to your house, the presence of a driveway is probably quite plain to pedestrians and a
    pedestrian is much more likely to see your car than to see a cyclist coming through gaps between
    parked cars.

    The OP asked if his actions were illegal (which they would appear to be) and I suggested that he is
    inconsiderate and lazy in not pushing. After all, how wide is his pavement? 30 metres or something?
    I wouldn't say that you were lazy and inconsiderate for driving your car into your driveway. I
    assume that your car is a bit heavier than his bike.

    There are people on this NG who would say that you are lazy and inconsiderate for using your car at
    all. But I'm not one of them. :)
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  6. Tony R

    Tony R Guest

    "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi, I just got back from a morning ride and needed to cross the pavement to get to my flat (on the
    > other side of the pavement). So I turned between some of the parked cars and made my way onto the
    > pavement (all very routine for me), at which point some old dude shouted at me that riding on the
    > pavement was illegal.
    >
    > I had some vague notion that if you're just crossing a pavement to get to private premises on the
    > other side (like the entrance to my block of flats) then you can ride legally - but maybe I'm
    > wrong: the only thing I can find in the highway code re: riding across pavements is section 54:
    >
    > "You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement. Do not leave your cycle where it would endanger or obstruct
    > road users or pedestrians, for example, lying on the pavement. Use cycle parking facilities where
    > provided. "
    >
    > http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/03.shtml
    >
    > From this, it seems that crossing the pavement isn't legal - but the above does seem more designed
    > to apply to people just riding along the pavement - not crossing it.
    >
    > Does anyone know what the law is with regards to riding across the pavement, from a road to a
    > private residence?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Steve

    You must have wide pavements if it's too much trouble to walk across them. tony R.
     
  7. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi, I just got back from a morning ride and needed to cross the pavement to get to my flat (on the
    > other side of the pavement). So I turned between some of the parked cars and made my way onto the
    > pavement (all very routine for me), at which point some old dude shouted at me that riding on the
    > pavement was illegal.
    >
    > I had some vague notion that if you're just crossing a pavement to get to private premises on the
    > other side (like the entrance to my block of flats) then you can ride legally - but maybe I'm
    > wrong: the only thing I can find in the highway code re: riding across pavements is section 54:
    >
    > "You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement. Do not leave your cycle where it would endanger or obstruct
    > road users or pedestrians, for example, lying on the pavement. Use cycle parking facilities where
    > provided. "
    >
    > http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/03.shtml
    >
    > From this, it seems that crossing the pavement isn't legal - but the above does seem more designed
    > to apply to people just riding along the pavement - not crossing it.
    >
    > Does anyone know what the law is with regards to riding across the pavement, from a road to a
    > private residence?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Steve
    .....following other replies..... Your observation of the highway code is correct. You must not ride
    on the pavement. A simple straightforward statement that carries no vagueness and requires no
    interpretation. So, from that point of view, your query is pointless... However, out in the real
    world, as long as you are observant, in complete control of your bike, only crossing the path and
    not carrying out endos, stoppies etc to impress your mates, passing girlies / motorists, then in the
    grand scheme of things it's probably not too bad <ducks!!>...it certainly doesn't compare with
    carrying an AK47 and spraying partygoers indiscriminantly, know what I mean ? The old dude was
    correct, take note young man!! you could get busted if someone needed to get their stats up on a
    quiet day or a chief super suddenly got a bee in his bonnet. Cheers, ride safe. Dave.
     
  8. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Steve <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Hi, I just got back from a morning ride and needed to cross the pavement to get to my flat (on the
    > other side of the pavement). So I turned between some of the parked cars and made my way onto the
    > pavement (all very routine for me), at which point some old dude shouted at me that riding on the
    > pavement was illegal.
    >
    > I had some vague notion that if you're just crossing a pavement to get to private premises on the
    > other side (like the entrance to my block of flats) then you can ride legally - but maybe I'm
    > wrong: the only thing I can find in the highway code re: riding across pavements is section 54:
    >
    > "You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement. Do not leave your cycle where it would endanger or obstruct
    > road users or pedestrians, for example, lying on the pavement. Use cycle parking facilities where
    > provided. "
    >
    > http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/03.shtml
    >
    > From this, it seems that crossing the pavement isn't legal - but the above does seem more designed
    > to apply to people just riding along the pavement - not crossing it.
    >
    > Does anyone know what the law is with regards to riding across the pavement, from a road to a
    > private residence?
    >

    AFAIR its covered by Section 184 of the Highways Act 1980 under which owners or occupiers of
    premises adjacent to the highway may apply to the Highways Authority for permission for vehicular
    access to the highway. If you have that permission - it will be in place for most drives of houses
    for example - then you can cross in the designated place. If not its an offence under the same
    section of the Act.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to
    adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George
    Bernard Shaw
     
  9. Steve

    Steve Guest

    On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 09:39:54 +0100, wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter wrote:

    > From your description of turning between parked cars it sounds like you are going on to the
    > pavement rather than crossing at a proper access point. Is it difficult to dismount & walk the
    > bike in??

    I live in a block of terraced flats. There are doors every second flat along, allowing access to the
    8 flats per block (4 stories high, 2 flats per level, one on the left, one on the right, the
    door/hallway/stairs through the middle of the building). There is a smallish garden at the front of
    every flat with a pathway running for about 5 meters from the door to the block of flats to the main
    pavement which runs along parallel to the row of terraced blocks of flats.

    The pavement is about 2.5m wide and running parallel to the pavement is the main road, which is
    busy-ish - mostly residential traffic. The pavement is also fairly quiet.

    As it's a residential area in the middle-ish of a large-ish UK city, car (parallel) parking is just
    at the side of the street and is quite busy. As these are blocks of terraced flats, there are no
    driveways. The only way to get from road to the 4m pathway (hence door of flat) is to cross the
    pavement. And because of the parallel parked cars, I have to turn between two parked cars.

    Basically what I'm trying to say is: there is no "proper access point".

    As for whether or not it's difficult to dismount - not necessarily difficult - maybe marginally
    adventurous though, with the #42 bus charging up behind, attempting to mow me down if I don't get
    off the middle of the street fairly soon...

    Is crossing the pavement to get to my flat really that unreasonable?

    Steve
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, steve_m987 @softhome.net says...

    > As for whether or not it's difficult to dismount - not necessarily difficult - maybe marginally
    > adventurous though, with the #42 bus charging up behind, attempting to mow me down if I don't get
    > off the middle of the street fairly soon...

    You said that you pulled in between parked cars, surely then you are protected from the #42?

    I must admit to never having had any real problems pulling up at the side of the kerb and
    dismounting regardless of the number of the bus or the number of buses.

    > Is crossing the pavement to get to my flat really that unreasonable?

    You asked whether it was illegal, not whether it was unreasonable.

    Colin
     
  11. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Steve <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Is crossing the pavement to get to my flat really that unreasonable?
    >

    Its not most heinous crime in the world but on the other hand is it that unreasonable to walk 2.5m ?
    OTOH you could always put in an application to the Council under Section 184 of the Highways Act
    1980 for vehicular accesss and regularise your position completely.

    Tony

    "The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they
    want, and, if they can't find them, they make them" George Bernard Shaw
     
  12. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    Steve wrote:

    >On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 09:39:54 +0100, wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter wrote:
    >
    >> From your description of turning between parked cars it sounds like you are going on to the
    >> pavement rather than crossing at a proper access point. Is it difficult to dismount & walk the
    >> bike in??
    >
    >I live in a block of terraced flats. There are doors every second flat along, allowing access to
    >the 8 flats per block (4 stories high, 2 flats per level, one on the left, one on the right, the
    >door/hallway/stairs through the middle of the building). There is a smallish garden at the front of
    >every flat with a pathway running for about 5 meters from the door to the block of flats to the
    >main pavement which runs along parallel to the row of terraced blocks of flats.
    >
    >The pavement is about 2.5m wide and running parallel to the pavement is the main road, which is
    >busy-ish - mostly residential traffic. The pavement is also fairly quiet.
    >
    >As it's a residential area in the middle-ish of a large-ish UK city, car (parallel) parking is just
    >at the side of the street and is quite busy. As these are blocks of terraced flats, there are no
    >driveways. The only way to get from road to the 4m pathway (hence door of flat) is to cross the
    >pavement. And because of the parallel parked cars, I have to turn between two parked cars.
    >
    >Basically what I'm trying to say is: there is no "proper access point".
    >
    >As for whether or not it's difficult to dismount - not necessarily difficult - maybe marginally
    >adventurous though, with the #42 bus charging up behind, attempting to mow me down if I don't get
    >off the middle of the street fairly soon...
    >
    >Is crossing the pavement to get to my flat really that unreasonable?

    I too live in a block of terraced flats. The pavement is privately owned - by the flat owners.

    If your flat is on a private estate, the pavement is probably owned by the estate.

    I was once stopped by a policeman for cycling on the pavement alongside a station. I pointed out
    that I was cycling on bridleway access across Railtrack property, and that he had about as much
    right to arrest me there as he would on my garden path.

    He soon saw the error of his ways, but didn't apologise.
    --
    remove remove to reply
     
  13. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    I own the pavement that allows access to my driveway and frequently cycle on it, simply because I
    can't be asked to get off the bike and open the garage door, then unlock it. I just cycle straight
    in. Oh, did I mention the IR switch for Garage door on my handlebars. Now that's the epitimy of
    laziness. :eek:)

    Gadget
     
  14. Chilly

    Chilly Guest

  15. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 09:07:03 +0100, Steve <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement. Do not leave your cycle where it would endanger or obstruct
    > road users or pedestrians, for example, lying on the pavement. Use cycle parking facilities where
    > provided. "
    >
    > http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/03.shtml
    >
    > From this, it seems that crossing the pavement isn't legal - but the above does seem more
    > designed to apply to people just riding along the pavement - not crossing it.

    I think that's just another example of the shoddy phrasing of the highway code cyclists section -
    like the exhortation to track stand at traffic lights ("keep both feet on teh pedals at all times").

    Further on there's a bit that applies to all vehicles, including cycles, which says not to go on
    pavements except to gain lawful access. That clause refers to teh same act as teh bit you quote
    above, so the highway code can't decide for itself what the act says, so you'd have to actually
    check teh act to find out for sure.

    regards, Ian SMith
    --
    |\ /| no .sig
    |o o|
    |/ \|
     
  16. "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote: ...
    | Your observation of the highway code is correct. You must not ride on the pavement. A simple
    | straightforward statement that carries no vagueness and requires no interpretation. So, from that
    | point of view, your query is pointless... However, out in the real world, as long as you are
    | observant, in complete control of your bike, only crossing the path and not carrying out endos,
    | stoppies etc to impress your mates, passing girlies / motorists, then in the grand scheme of
    | things it's probably not too bad <ducks!!>...it certainly doesn't compare with carrying an AK47
    | and spraying partygoers indiscriminantly, know what I mean ? The old dude was correct, take note
    | young man!! you could get busted if someone needed to get their stats up on a quiet day or a chief
    | super suddenly got a bee in his bonnet.

    That's what I've done too, in the past. Always get off without comment if anyone makes a point or if
    there are kiddies running around etc, otherwise a few metres of illegal coasting is worth training
    yourself to keep in perspective. And don't wear Lycra, but then that's always the case.

    --
    Patrick Herring, Sheffield, UK http://www.anweald.co.uk
     
  17. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Gadget" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]... <snip> simply because I can't be asked to
    get off the bike and open the garage
    > door,
    <snip> Oh yes you can, something along the lines of " please get off your bike and open the garage
    door" should do it ;-)

    Oh, did I mention the IR
    > switch for Garage door on my handlebars. Now that's the epitimy of
    laziness.
    > :eek:)
    >
    > Gadget
    >
    >
    Presumably hence Gadget, Gadget ?

    Dave.
     
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