CruzBike?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by (PeteCresswell), Nov 26, 2007.

  1. Never heard of it.

    Does anybody actually have one of these things?
    http://www.cruzbike.com/

    Been flirting with the idea of a 'bent for a number of years -
    just for path riding but, being a statistical outlier
    body-dimension-wise, have shied away from the cost of a custom.

    Cruz' attraction is that the drive system seems to lend itself to
    fairly extreme leg length adjustments - yet fit on the average
    trunk-mount bike rack.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
    Tags:


  2. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > Never heard of it.
    >
    > Does anybody actually have one of these things?
    > http://www.cruzbike.com/
    >

    Not me.
    >
    > Been flirting with the idea of a 'bent for a number of years -
    >

    Oh, the HORROR!!! ;)
    >
    > just for path riding but, being a statistical outlier
    > body-dimension-wise, have shied away from the cost of a custom.
    >

    My opinion is that recumbents are best on the open road, or ridden in a
    "vehicular cycling" mode. Path generally have too many features that
    need to be maneuvered at low speed with tight turns, which is not a
    forte of recumbent bicycles (trikes are a different matter).

    Describe more specifically how you differ from the norm, and perhaps
    suggestions for suitable bicycles could be made. Recumbent fit concerns
    are rather different than those of uprights.
    >
    > Cruz' attraction is that the drive system seems to lend itself to
    > fairly extreme leg length adjustments - yet fit on the average
    > trunk-mount bike rack.
    >

    I would hesitate to buy without a chance to ride one first. Moving
    bottom bracket bicycle can be rather odd in the handling department.
    Note that the number of dealers is sparse, so finding a test ride may
    not be practical.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    "Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
    differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
    excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter
     
  3. Joe Bernard

    Joe Bernard Guest

    On Nov 26, 8:11 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > > Never heard of it.

    >
    > > Does anybody actually have one of these things?
    > >http://www.cruzbike.com/

    >
    > Not me.
    > >> Been flirting with the idea of a 'bent for a number of years -

    >
    > >

    > Oh, the HORROR!!! ;)
    > >> just for path riding but, being a statistical outlier

    > > body-dimension-wise, have shied away from the cost of a custom.

    >
    > >

    > My opinion is that recumbents are best on the open road, or ridden in a
    > "vehicular cycling" mode. Path generally have too many features that
    > need to be maneuvered at low speed with tight turns, which is not a
    > forte of recumbent bicycles (trikes are a different matter).
    >
    > Describe more specifically how you differ from the norm, and perhaps
    > suggestions for suitable bicycles could be made. Recumbent fit concerns
    > are rather different than those of uprights.
    >
    > > Cruz' attraction is that the drive system seems to lend itself to
    > > fairly extreme leg length adjustments - yet fit on the average
    > > trunk-mount bike rack.

    >
    > >

    > I would hesitate to buy without a chance to ride one first. Moving
    > bottom bracket bicycle can be rather odd in the handling department.
    > Note that the number of dealers is sparse, so finding a test ride may
    > not be practical.
    >
    > --
    > Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    > "Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
    > differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
    > excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter


    Labeling all recumbents as not suitable for bike paths is a massive
    generalization. My short-wheelbase Rans Rocket is very agile at low
    speeds and tight turns. My long-wheelbase Sun EZ-Sport is almost as
    good.
     
  4. On Nov 26, 4:27 pm, "(PeteCresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Never heard of it.
    >
    > Does anybody actually have one of these things?http://www.cruzbike.com/
    >
    > Been flirting with the idea of a 'bent for a number of years -
    > just for path riding but, being a statistical outlier
    > body-dimension-wise, have shied away from the cost of a custom.
    >
    > Cruz' attraction is that the drive system seems to lend itself to
    > fairly extreme leg length adjustments - yet fit on the average
    > trunk-mount bike rack.
    > --
    > PeteCresswell


    Another person on http://www.bikejournal.com bought one. There was a
    bit of a learning curve due to having to hold the handlebars against
    the pedalling, but otherwise similar to Short wheel recumbents. A
    couple of miles and he felt comfortable in most situations, a couple
    of hundred miles before he was ready for high effort pedalling.
    During this time, he ended up walking some hills due to the excessive
    wobble.
     
  5. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    PeteCresswell wrote:
    >
    > Does anybody actually have one of these things?http://www.cruzbike.com/


    I helped a 13-year-old kid build something like that in a community
    bike shop a few years ago. It was quite ridable (for him, I didn't
    try it myself since it was li'l-scooter sized). It looked like quite
    a bit of work was required at the handlebars to keep the front wheel
    from turning with each pedal stroke.

    The best application for the Cruzbike IMO is as an electric assist
    bike. The rear wheel can easily be set up with a front hub motor, and
    having motor power to provide surges of speed and acceleration would
    make the whole arms-fighting-legs aspect of the thing more tolerable.
    At least one of the frequent contributors to the Yahoo power-assist
    and e-motor-assist groups uses a Cruzbike.

    Chalo
     
  6. DougC

    DougC Guest

    (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > Never heard of it.
    >
    > Does anybody actually have one of these things?
    > http://www.cruzbike.com/


    I don't have one either, never have.
    Home-builders have been making bikes (and trikes) like this forever.
    Cruzbike started out selling a conversion kit for Y-frame MTB's, and has
    progressed to selling whole bikes.

    I'm not particularly interested in the design, but I do like how they
    integrated full suspension into the Silvio. If I could have gotten a
    road/touring bike with full suspension back in '97 or '98, I might have
    never gotten around to trying recumbents at all.

    > Been flirting with the idea of a 'bent for a number of years -
    > just for path riding but, being a statistical outlier
    > body-dimension-wise, have shied away from the cost of a custom.


    One problem people tend to have with SWB's of all types is the
    relatively high seating position, that makes "remaining stationary but
    sitting on the bike" difficult. Recumbents aren't like upright bikes,
    where you can scoot forward off the saddle and straddle the top tube
    while standing.

    > Cruz' attraction is that the drive system seems to lend itself to
    > fairly extreme leg length adjustments - yet fit on the average
    > trunk-mount bike rack.


    Will an extreme range really be important? Are two people of different
    heights going to regularly use it? A shorter person probably won't like
    it for the ground-reach problem, as noted.

    As for transportation problems, it's part of the deal.

    Recumbent dealers are fewer, prices are higher and transportation is
    more of a hassle--but the actual riding is wonderful. What's more
    important in a recreational bicycle--the accessibility, price and ease
    of transportation? Or the actual seat time?
    ~
     
  7. Scott Gordo

    Scott Gordo Guest

    On Nov 27, 1:46 am, Joe Bernard <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Nov 26, 8:11 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > > > Never heard of it.

    >
    > > > Does anybody actually have one of these things?
    > > >http://www.cruzbike.com/

    >
    > > Not me.
    > > >> Been flirting with the idea of a 'bent for a number of years -

    >
    > > Oh, the HORROR!!! ;)
    > > >> just for path riding but, being a statistical outlier
    > > > body-dimension-wise, have shied away from the cost of a custom.

    >
    > > My opinion is that recumbents are best on the open road, or ridden in a
    > > "vehicular cycling" mode. Path generally have too many features that
    > > need to be maneuvered at low speed with tight turns, which is not a
    > > forte of recumbent bicycles (trikes are a different matter).

    >
    > > Describe more specifically how you differ from the norm, and perhaps
    > > suggestions for suitable bicycles could be made. Recumbent fit concerns
    > > are rather different than those of uprights.

    >
    > > > Cruz' attraction is that the drive system seems to lend itself to
    > > > fairly extreme leg length adjustments - yet fit on the average
    > > > trunk-mount bike rack.

    >
    > > I would hesitate to buy without a chance to ride one first. Moving
    > > bottom bracket bicycle can be rather odd in the handling department.
    > > Note that the number of dealers is sparse, so finding a test ride may
    > > not be practical.

    >
    > > --
    > > Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    > > "Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
    > > differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
    > > excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter

    >
    > Labeling all recumbents as not suitable for bike paths is a massive
    > generalization. My short-wheelbase Rans Rocket is very agile at low
    > speeds and tight turns. My long-wheelbase Sun EZ-Sport is almost as
    > good.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    From looking at that cruzbike.com page, it dawned on me that
    recumbents must require more of a leap of faith handling-wise. Looks
    like there's no way to redistribute your weight, and I don't see much
    of a way to plant a foot to prevent a crash.

    /s
     
  8. jur

    jur New Member

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  9. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Joe Bernard wrote:
    > On Nov 26, 8:11 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >> (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    >>> ...
    >> >> Been flirting with the idea of a 'bent for a number of years -

    >>
    >> Oh, the HORROR!!! ;)
    >> >> just for path riding...

    >>
    >> My opinion is that recumbents are best on the open road, or ridden in a
    >> "vehicular cycling" mode. Path generally have too many features that
    >> need to be maneuvered at low speed with tight turns, which is not a
    >> forte of recumbent bicycles (trikes are a different matter).

    > ...
    >
    > Labeling all recumbents as not suitable for bike paths is a massive
    > generalization. My short-wheelbase Rans Rocket is very agile at low
    > speeds and tight turns. My long-wheelbase Sun EZ-Sport is almost as
    > good.


    1. I did not label all recumbents as unsuitable for riding on paths.
    Rather, I was contending the real strength of recumbents is being ridden
    on the open road. Using a recumbent only on paths (as the original
    poster suggested doing) would be a significant under utilization of the
    bicycle.

    2. What is a "Rans Rocket"? Is it similar to the 2000 [1] RANS Rocket I
    have?

    3. While most paths can be negotiated on a recumbent without
    dismounting, it is much easier to deal with the really poorly designed
    sections on an upright bicycle, particularly an ATB. Of course, the
    recumbent is vastly superior to the ATB in comfort and speed.

    [1] By serial number, the frame is a 1999, but it came with the 2000
    seat, so I assume it was one of the leftover 1999 frames built up in 2000.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    "Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
    differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
    excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter
     
  10. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Scott Gordo wrote:
    > On Nov 27, 1:46 am, Joe Bernard <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Nov 26, 8:11 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>

    What up with Google - they need to fix their web interface to meet
    commonly accepted Usenet standards? The elimination of blank lines, the
    insertion of extra blank lines and ignoring the signature separator are
    all unacceptable.
    >>
    >>> (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    >>>> Never heard of it.
    >>>> Does anybody actually have one of these things?
    >>>> http://www.cruzbike.com/
    >>> Not me.
    >>> >> Been flirting with the idea of a 'bent for a number of years -
    >>> Oh, the HORROR!!! ;)
    >>> >> just for path riding but, being a statistical outlier
    >>>> body-dimension-wise, have shied away from the cost of a custom.
    >>> My opinion is that recumbents are best on the open road, or ridden in a
    >>> "vehicular cycling" mode. Path generally have too many features that
    >>> need to be maneuvered at low speed with tight turns, which is not a
    >>> forte of recumbent bicycles (trikes are a different matter).
    >>> Describe more specifically how you differ from the norm, and perhaps
    >>> suggestions for suitable bicycles could be made. Recumbent fit concerns
    >>> are rather different than those of uprights.
    >>>> Cruz' attraction is that the drive system seems to lend itself to
    >>>> fairly extreme leg length adjustments - yet fit on the average
    >>>> trunk-mount bike rack.
    >>> I would hesitate to buy without a chance to ride one first. Moving
    >>> bottom bracket bicycle can be rather odd in the handling department.
    >>> Note that the number of dealers is sparse, so finding a test ride may
    >>> not be practical.

    >
    >> Labeling all recumbents as not suitable for bike paths is a massive
    >> generalization. My short-wheelbase Rans Rocket is very agile at low
    >> speeds and tight turns. My long-wheelbase Sun EZ-Sport is almost as
    >> good.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > From looking at that cruzbike.com page, it dawned on me that
    > recumbents must require more of a leap of faith handling-wise. Looks
    > like there's no way to redistribute your weight, and I don't see much
    > of a way to plant a foot to prevent a crash.


    The CruzBike does look to have the weight distribution too far forward.

    You can not do the same type of maneuvers on a recumbent as on a
    upright, but this is really only of concern in technical off-road riding
    or certain types of non-vehicular cycling. For many types of riding,
    these limitations are unimportant.

    You do not want to plant your foot while riding a recumbent. On the
    other hand, if you are going slow enough that you could attempt a foot
    plant, a fall from a recumbent will not really hurt anything. Falling
    over on a recumbent is much less hurtful than doing the same on an upright.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    "Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
    differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
    excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter
     
  11. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Doug Cimper wrote:
    > ...
    > One problem people tend to have with SWB's of all types is the
    > relatively high seating position, that makes "remaining stationary but
    > sitting on the bike" difficult. Recumbents aren't like upright bikes,
    > where you can scoot forward off the saddle and straddle the top tube
    > while standing....


    I have a couple of short wheelbase (SWB) recumbents [1], and high seat
    height is not a problem. As a matter of fact, I can hold myself up with
    a hand on the ground. :)

    [1] Like this one
    <http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2016/1939602865_538c57728e.jpg?v=0>.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    "Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
    differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
    excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter
     
  12. Per Tom Sherman:
    >You can not do the same type of maneuvers on a recumbent as on a
    >upright, but this is really only of concern in technical off-road riding
    >or certain types of non-vehicular cycling.


    After I fired off the post, I realized that with the front wheel
    drive there might be difficulty negotiating something like a curb
    by raising the front wheel.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  13. Per DougC:
    >Will an extreme range really be important? Are two people of different
    >heights going to regularly use it? A shorter person probably won't like
    >it for the ground-reach problem, as noted.


    Not in the context of multiple users.

    I was just hoping that an off-the-shelf version might fit me or
    be easily modified to by lengthening the tube that supports the
    cranks.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  14. Per jur:
    >http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=267062


    Sounds to me like the guy's a happy camper so far, but doesn't
    have that many miles on it.

    The bit about pedaling force having tb offset by pressure on the
    handlebars went right over my head in the previous posts - but
    after reading the forum thread it finally dawned on me.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  15. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > Per Tom Sherman:
    >> You can not do the same type of maneuvers on a recumbent as on a
    >> upright, but this is really only of concern in technical off-road riding
    >> or certain types of non-vehicular cycling.

    >
    > After I fired off the post, I realized that with the front wheel
    > drive there might be difficulty negotiating something like a curb
    > by raising the front wheel.


    Raising the front wheel is very difficult to impossible on a recumbent.
    As I wrote, recumbents are best when used for "vehicular cycling". For
    some, that trade-off is negligible compared to the advantages in comfort
    and aerodynamic drag, for others it is not. As always, YMMV.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    "Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
    differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
    excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter
     
  16. On Nov 27, 9:22 am, Scott Gordo <[email protected]> wrote:

    > From looking at that cruzbike.com page, it dawned on me that
    > recumbents must require more of a leap of faith handling-wise. Looks
    > like there's no way to redistribute your weight, and I don't see much
    > of a way to plant a foot to prevent a crash.
    >
    > /s


    DING DING DING DING DING!!!
    We have a winner!

    Yes, on an upright bicycle, you balance by moving your body, or even
    pull up to pop a wheelie or bunny hop a curb.
    Yes, on a recumbent, you cannot move very much. You must learn to
    steer the front wheel toward the balance point, where the line between
    the tire contact patches is underneath the center of mass, and altered
    by a deliberate turn. For practice, I will hold a pipe or chain link
    fence, and attempt to balance with as little push / pull effort as
    possible. When approaching a red light or busy stop sign, I can ride
    real slow, close to a track stand.
    It is difficult for first time riders to get used to this, but you get
    used to it after a few miles.
     
  17. Jon

    Jon Guest

    > Doug Cimper wrote:
    >> ...
    >> One problem people tend to have with SWB's of all types is the relatively
    >> high seating position, that makes "remaining stationary but sitting on
    >> the bike" difficult.


    I have a "high-racer" style SWB (Volae) and wouldn't call remaining
    stationary while seated difficult at all. Normally one foot down, one foot
    clipped in works quite easily and comfortably. For extended stops,
    I can put both feet down and I can "sit up" in the seat.

    >> Recumbents aren't like upright bikes, where you can scoot forward off the
    >> saddle and straddle the top tube while standing....


    *Straddling the top tube* isn't "remaining stationary but sitting on the
    bike", of course. %^)

    "Tom Sherman" wrote
    > I have a couple of short wheelbase (SWB) recumbents [1], and high seat
    > height is not a problem. As a matter of fact, I can hold myself up with a
    > hand on the ground. :)


    I note the Wikipedia recumbent page incorrectly (at least as a blanket
    statement) asserts that recumbents are more difficult to start from
    a stop:

    Starting and Stopping
    Because the body position does not allow the rider to push
    the recumbent bike forward using his feet against the ground,
    the bikes can only be propelled forward using the pedals.
    This makes starting out slow and excellent balance is required. ...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recumbent_bicycle

    This of course completely ignores low-racers and trikes. %^)

    And it doesn't match my experience with starting and stopping any
    of my recumbents. It is particularly easy on my BikeE to "Flintstone"
    the bike with one or two feet on the ground. Low bottom bracket
    recumbents are quite easy to start and do not require more "execellent
    balance" than an upright.

    For higher bottom bracket recumbents, while they might require
    some rider "acclimatization," they do not universally require starting
    slow or with particular balance skills. Starting from a stop uphill in
    too low a gear may arguably present somewhat more challange than
    for an upright, perhaps...

    Jon
     
  18. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Jon Meinecke wrote:
    >> ...

    > And it doesn't match my experience with starting and stopping any
    > of my recumbents. It is particularly easy on my BikeE to "Flintstone"
    > the bike with one or two feet on the ground....


    I much prefer the term "draising" (after Karl Drais [1]) for this
    maneuver, which was coined by Bob Bryant in RCN [2].

    [1] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Drais>.
    [2] <http://www.recumbentcyclistnews.com/>.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    "Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
    differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
    excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter
     
  19. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Joe Bernard wrote:
    > ...
    > Aaaah I see. OK, settle it. Rans or RANS?


    Randy Schlitter says "RANS" is correct. End of argument.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    "Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
    differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
    excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter
     
  20. Joe Bernard

    Joe Bernard Guest

    On Nov 29, 4:23 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > Joe Bernard wrote:
    > > ...
    > > Aaaah I see. OK, settle it. Rans or RANS?

    >
    > Randy Schlitter says "RANS" is correct. End of argument.
    >
    > --
    > Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    > "Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
    > differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
    > excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter


    What does he know? Oh, right. I knew it, too, and can't believe I
    typed it wrong the first time. Don't tell my Rocket.
     
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