Curry plant [Was: It's about rice actually ;-) [Was: ? pressure cooking dried beans]]

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Phred, Mar 4, 2005.

  1. Phred

    Phred Guest

    [ Sorry for breaking the thread, but my heirloom newsreader (News
    Xpress 2.01) choked on the excessively long References header.]

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Katra <[email protected]> wrote:
    [snip]
    >I've not cooked with curry for awhile and I have plenty in the spice
    >cabinet, plus a live "curry" plant out in the herb garden.
    >
    >Now I realize that curry is actually a mixture of spices including
    >turmeric and chiles, this "curry" plant I think is related to
    >rosemary, or at least the growth pattern is the same.


    I presume this is _Helichrysum italicum_? See:
    <http://www.uq.net.au/hyperlinked/Herbs/curry.htm>

    The other "curry plant" is probably more correctly(?) known as "curry
    leaf" (_Murraya koenigii_) for which it's claimed "Most Indian cuisine
    cannot do without the subtle flavouring of this highly aromatic leafy
    spice." <http://www.indianspices.com/html/s062fclf.htm>

    >The bruised leaves smell just like curry and add a nice light flavor
    >to the meat that I put it on. It's not growing very well so I can't
    >harvest a lot at a time, but it's nice!


    I suspect the _Murraya_ also wouldn't grow very well where you are.
    (See <http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/curry.htm> for photos of a well
    grown specimen. ;-)

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID
     
    Tags:


  2. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Phred" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >[ Sorry for breaking the thread, but my heirloom newsreader (News
    > Xpress 2.01) choked on the excessively long References header.]
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Katra <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [snip]
    >>I've not cooked with curry for awhile and I have plenty in the spice
    >>cabinet, plus a live "curry" plant out in the herb garden.
    >>
    >>Now I realize that curry is actually a mixture of spices including
    >>turmeric and chiles, this "curry" plant I think is related to
    >>rosemary, or at least the growth pattern is the same.

    >
    > I presume this is _Helichrysum italicum_? See:
    > <http://www.uq.net.au/hyperlinked/Herbs/curry.htm>
    >
    > The other "curry plant" is probably more correctly(?) known as "curry
    > leaf" (_Murraya koenigii_) for which it's claimed "Most Indian cuisine
    > cannot do without the subtle flavouring of this highly aromatic leafy
    > spice." <http://www.indianspices.com/html/s062fclf.htm>
    >
    >>The bruised leaves smell just like curry and add a nice light flavor
    >>to the meat that I put it on. It's not growing very well so I can't
    >>harvest a lot at a time, but it's nice!

    >
    > I suspect the _Murraya_ also wouldn't grow very well where you are.
    > (See <http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/curry.htm> for photos of a well
    > grown specimen. ;-)
    >


    The curry plant - the Murraya one - is used a lot in southern Indian dishes,
    less so in the north. It must be easy to grow because I, the original black
    thumb guy, have a healthy specimen several years old. It's in a large pot
    (it's about 3 feet tall now) and it's outside during the frost-free part of
    the year (North Carolina, so about 7 months) and indoors near a bright
    window the rest of the time. It gets a shot of miracle-grow once a month or
    so. My parents have been successful growing them in New Jersey. Lovers of
    Indian food should make an effort to grow one, it makes a big difference in
    some dishes.


    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  3. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Phred) wrote:

    > [ Sorry for breaking the thread, but my heirloom newsreader (News
    > Xpress 2.01) choked on the excessively long References header.]
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Katra <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [snip]
    > >I've not cooked with curry for awhile and I have plenty in the spice
    > >cabinet, plus a live "curry" plant out in the herb garden.
    > >
    > >Now I realize that curry is actually a mixture of spices including
    > >turmeric and chiles, this "curry" plant I think is related to
    > >rosemary, or at least the growth pattern is the same.

    >
    > I presume this is _Helichrysum italicum_? See:
    > <http://www.uq.net.au/hyperlinked/Herbs/curry.htm>


    That is probably it, but mine is much fluffier and has never bloomed. :)
    A very intense flavor, very wonderful! Mild and very "curry-ish". I love
    it!

    >
    > The other "curry plant" is probably more correctly(?) known as "curry
    > leaf" (_Murraya koenigii_) for which it's claimed "Most Indian cuisine
    > cannot do without the subtle flavouring of this highly aromatic leafy
    > spice." <http://www.indianspices.com/html/s062fclf.htm>
    >
    > >The bruised leaves smell just like curry and add a nice light flavor
    > >to the meat that I put it on. It's not growing very well so I can't
    > >harvest a lot at a time, but it's nice!

    >
    > I suspect the _Murraya_ also wouldn't grow very well where you are.
    > (See <http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/curry.htm> for photos of a well
    > grown specimen. ;-)


    Hummm... I might have to look into that!

    Here is a picture of my curry plant that I got from the nursery:

    http://home.centurytel.net/Katraslink/CurryPlant.jpg

    It's still kinda small, but at least it survived the winter. :)
    I'm thinking about trying some foliar fertilization in the herb garden.


    >
    > Cheers, Phred.


    --
    K.

    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  4. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Phred" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >[ Sorry for breaking the thread, but my heirloom newsreader (News
    > > Xpress 2.01) choked on the excessively long References header.]
    > >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Katra <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > [snip]
    > >>I've not cooked with curry for awhile and I have plenty in the spice
    > >>cabinet, plus a live "curry" plant out in the herb garden.
    > >>
    > >>Now I realize that curry is actually a mixture of spices including
    > >>turmeric and chiles, this "curry" plant I think is related to
    > >>rosemary, or at least the growth pattern is the same.

    > >
    > > I presume this is _Helichrysum italicum_? See:
    > > <http://www.uq.net.au/hyperlinked/Herbs/curry.htm>
    > >
    > > The other "curry plant" is probably more correctly(?) known as "curry
    > > leaf" (_Murraya koenigii_) for which it's claimed "Most Indian cuisine
    > > cannot do without the subtle flavouring of this highly aromatic leafy
    > > spice." <http://www.indianspices.com/html/s062fclf.htm>
    > >
    > >>The bruised leaves smell just like curry and add a nice light flavor
    > >>to the meat that I put it on. It's not growing very well so I can't
    > >>harvest a lot at a time, but it's nice!

    > >
    > > I suspect the _Murraya_ also wouldn't grow very well where you are.
    > > (See <http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/curry.htm> for photos of a well
    > > grown specimen. ;-)
    > >

    >
    > The curry plant - the Murraya one - is used a lot in southern Indian dishes,
    > less so in the north. It must be easy to grow because I, the original black
    > thumb guy, have a healthy specimen several years old. It's in a large pot
    > (it's about 3 feet tall now) and it's outside during the frost-free part of
    > the year (North Carolina, so about 7 months) and indoors near a bright
    > window the rest of the time. It gets a shot of miracle-grow once a month or
    > so. My parents have been successful growing them in New Jersey. Lovers of
    > Indian food should make an effort to grow one, it makes a big difference in
    > some dishes.


    I'll have to take a look at that, thanks! :)
    It's nice to have the curry flavor without the heat.

    Here is the plant I currently use, and it really does smell and taste
    like curry:

    http://home.centurytel.net/Katraslink/CurryPlant.jpg

    I lost my first one before the year was out, but this little dude
    survived the winter and has quadrupled in size. I may apply a shade
    screen over the summer this time to give it a hand.

    --
    K.

    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  5. kalanamak

    kalanamak Guest

    Peter Aitken wrote:
    >
    > My parents have been successful growing them in New Jersey. Lovers of
    > Indian food should make an effort to grow one, it makes a big difference in
    > some dishes.
    >

    Especially dal. The dal, quick to cook, made of the hulled and halved
    lentil that leaves a bright coral small product just begs for it.
    blacksalt
     
  6. actually dwarf murraya should grow just fine indoors potted by a sunny
    window. the regular variety will become a tree eventually if given the
    opportunity.

    the traditional curry plant (and the only one that is used in india) is
    murraya koenigii with green flat compound leaves; you should be able to
    get the regular murraya and even the dwarf variety by mail order (check
    bhatia-nurseries.com) in the warmer months.

    Helichrysum italicum with the needle leaves is a european herb said to
    resemble curry in scent, but of course is not associated with indian
    cooking.

    ______
    http://www.indiecookbooks.com
    nothing but reviews of independent cookbooks from churches, community
    groups, and self-published authors.
     
  7. Phred

    Phred Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Katra <[email protected]> wrote:
    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (Phred) wrote:
    >
    >> [ Sorry for breaking the thread, but my heirloom newsreader (News
    >> Xpress 2.01) choked on the excessively long References header.]

    [snip]
    >> I suspect the _Murraya_ also wouldn't grow very well where you are.


    I see others have suggested I may have been too pessimistic there. :)

    >> (See <http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/curry.htm> for photos of a well
    >> grown specimen. ;-)

    >
    >Hummm... I might have to look into that!
    >
    >Here is a picture of my curry plant that I got from the nursery:
    >
    >http://home.centurytel.net/Katraslink/CurryPlant.jpg


    I'm gunna have to look seriously into this business of having a web
    site where one can post pictures instead of writing a thousand words!

    >It's still kinda small, but at least it survived the winter. :)
    >I'm thinking about trying some foliar fertilization in the herb garden.


    I've never really been into potted plants as I was too often away for
    somewhat extended periods and things in pots need watering.
    That said, even when I'm home I have trouble remembering to water pots
    as a pot of basil will fortunately attest. Someone gave me the thing
    months ago, and I noticed it was looking a bit stressed four days ago,
    but I was in the middle of other things at the time and then forgot
    about it. When I noticed again yesterday, I was *sure* it had reached
    the dreaded permanent wilting point, but gave it a drink anyway
    (thinking it was probably more like a burial at sea). Today it is
    looking great! Damn tough herbs these basil things is all I can say.

    Good luck with the _Murraya_ if you attempt it. It does rather seem
    de riguer in Indian cooking. (Luckily, friends down the road have a
    couple of trees in their yard. :)

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID
     
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